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OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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Apr 24, 2010
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#44
What if people who want to break quarantine already live in areas where it's safe to return to degrees of normalcy? You appear to support them with your last statement.
I don't give yes or no answers where nuance is necessary.

I think a lot of people on this board feel that they are being smart and making intelligent plans of action.
I understand wanting a sense of normalcy. And some of the restrictions are mind-numbingly frustrating. No one likes being on house arrest; it's part of the reason groundings and house arrests are punishments.

I think a lot of people on this board don't have family and friends in NY tristate area and it shows.

In two months, more people have died from an illness in NYC that has claimed more lives than the last 20 years of homicides in New York City.
 
Jan 21, 2006
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#46
I don't give yes or no answers where nuance is necessary.

I think a lot of people on this board feel that they are being smart and making intelligent plans of action.
I understand wanting a sense of normalcy. And some of the restrictions are mind-numbingly frustrating. No one likes being on house arrest; it's part of the reason groundings and house arrests are punishments.

I think a lot of people on this board don't have family and friends in NY tristate area and it shows.

In two months, more people have died from an illness in NYC that has claimed more lives than the last 20 years of homicides in New York City.
OK your mentioned that nuances are needed, but ended with a bromide that more have died from thin than the last 20 yrs of homicides. What are the breakdowns of the deaths by age. pre-existing conditions, etc? This is bad, no doubt. However, in colorado well over half the deaths are in care facilities. There is a reason people are in these facilities. They are old and very compromised. Life expectancy is about 13 months upon entering one. I quit my rant by stating I am 75 and terminal, just like every one of you reading this. Sorry an athletic forum has dissolved into this.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#47
I don't give yes or no answers where nuance is necessary.

I think a lot of people on this board feel that they are being smart and making intelligent plans of action.
I understand wanting a sense of normalcy. And some of the restrictions are mind-numbingly frustrating. No one likes being on house arrest; it's part of the reason groundings and house arrests are punishments.

I think a lot of people on this board don't have family and friends in NY tristate area and it shows.

In two months, more people have died from an illness in NYC that has claimed more lives than the last 20 years of homicides in New York City.
Have you known all along that NY & NJ mandated that nursing homes take in COVID patients released from hospitals?

I didn't. You think that maybe, just maybe that was a god awful plan that clearly targeted the most vulnerable?

My father was an early positive for COVID, living at home with my mother, who's immune-compromised. She found out a few weeks later that her boss, who she works closely with, was positive. Somehow, she's not gotten it, thank god.

I work everyday in a hospital, so you can spare me the whole tristate area discussion, I'm aware.

And you never answered my question, just threw out some vague response to a specific situation.
 
Feb 15, 2007
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#48
Have you known all along that NY & NJ mandated that nursing homes take in COVID patients released from hospitals?

I didn't. You think that maybe, just maybe that was a god awful plan that clearly targeted the most vulnerable?

My father was an early positive for COVID, living at home with my mother, who's immune-compromised. She found out a few weeks later that her boss, who she works closely with, was positive. Somehow, she's not gotten it, thank god.

I work everyday in a hospital, so you can spare me the whole tristate area discussion, I'm aware.

And you never answered my question, just threw out some vague response to a specific situation.

Anyone who would knowingly send infected/sick people back to live amongst some of the most vulnerable people lacks even a shred of decency and humanity. Hopefully Cuomo's ridiculously positive approval ratings are a reflection that the masses aren't aware of his behavior.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
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Jun 24, 2005
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#49
I

I understand wanting a sense of normalcy. And some of the restrictions are mind-numbingly frustrating. No one likes being on house arrest; it's part of the reason groundings and house arrests are punishments.
.
House arrest is annoying but I'm a couch potato anyway so it's not the end of the world. The bigger issue is closing businesses and destroying livelihoods.

The restrictions aren't just "frustrating", they are unconstitutional and devastating to the economy. In a year or so many will understand why trashing the economy was kind of a big deal. States are going to have to figure out how to pay 100's of thousands of people on unemployment with 100's of thousands fewer people paying into the system. That's going to get real one of these days.
 
Sep 9, 2013
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#51
And so it begins,

WVU gets a pac 12 grad who started all 3 years at safety for Arz. I think the pac 12 will get depleted with the noise that they may not play this season.

West Virginia picked up a stunning grad transfer commit on Saturday afternoon as former Arizona safety Scottie Young Jr. pledged to the Mountaineers.
 

OrangeFan69

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#52
https://abcnews.go.com/US/texas-cases-covid-19-increasing-thousands-reopening/story?id=70720497

Texas COVID-19 cases rise, governor's office says more testing being done
The deaths are also steadily increasing.
By
Gina Sunseri
and
Ella Torres
May 16, 2020, 10:41 AM
4 min read


Texas has seen a steady rise in novel coronavirus cases and fatalities since reopening just over two weeks ago.

There are now 45,198 confirmed cases of COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services. That is an increase of 1,347 cases from Thursday to Friday. The new numbers have not yet been recorded for Saturday.


Last Friday, the daily case increase was 1,219.

While the cases are still well below New York, the state with the most confirmed cases at more than 345,000, the steady increase shows that the curve has not yet flattened in Texas.

The state also experienced its highest and second-highest daily death toll just a day apart. On Thursday, 58 deaths were recorded in 24 hours and Friday that number dropped only slightly to 56, according to the healthdepartment. The total number of fatalities is at 1,272.

Last Friday, the daily death toll was 31.

Hospitalizations rates have appeared to flatten, but that data is reported on a two-week lag. Currently there are 1,716 people in a Texas hospital, according to the health department.

Gov. Greg Abbott's communications director John Wittman told ABC News that the amount of testing has doubled since reopening, contributing to the rise in cases.

"Since [COVID-19 testing] started, we did 330,000 tests in March and April. Since May 1, we have done over 330,000 -- so in 16 days we have doubled our testing from the previous entire two months," Wittman said.

"The governor has been clear that as the state of Texas conducts more tests, we will see the raw number of cases rise," Wittman said. "However, the [rolling seven-day] average positivity rate has steadily declined from our high April 13 [of a bit more than 13%] to around 5% today. Our hospitalizations remain steady, and Texas has one of the lowest death rates per capita in the nation."

Texas began reopening after its stay-at-home order was lifted on April 30.

Restaurants are open for in-person dining at 25% capacity. Movie theaters and malls are also open at 25% capacity.
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#53
Have you known all along that NY & NJ mandated that nursing homes take in COVID patients released from hospitals?

I didn't. You think that maybe, just maybe that was a god awful plan that clearly targeted the most vulnerable?

My father was an early positive for COVID, living at home with my mother, who's immune-compromised. She found out a few weeks later that her boss, who she works closely with, was positive. Somehow, she's not gotten it, thank god.

I work everyday in a hospital, so you can spare me the whole tristate area discussion, I'm aware.

And you never answered my question, just threw out some vague response to a specific situation.

Anyone who would knowingly send infected/sick people back to live amongst some of the most vulnerable people lacks even a shred of decency and humanity. Hopefully Cuomo's ridiculously positive approval ratings are a reflection that the masses aren't aware of his behavior.
Hopefully, as you say, they aren't aware, and when they do become aware they hold him accountable.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

MustangPokeFan

Territorial Marshal
Sep 9, 2005
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Mustang, Ok
www.newshoesband.net
#54
Have you known all along that NY & NJ mandated that nursing homes take in COVID patients released from hospitals?

I didn't. You think that maybe, just maybe that was a god awful plan that clearly targeted the most vulnerable?

My father was an early positive for COVID, living at home with my mother, who's immune-compromised. She found out a few weeks later that her boss, who she works closely with, was positive. Somehow, she's not gotten it, thank god.

I work everyday in a hospital, so you can spare me the whole tristate area discussion, I'm aware.

And you never answered my question, just threw out some vague response to a specific situation.

Anyone who would knowingly send infected/sick people back to live amongst some of the most vulnerable people lacks even a shred of decency and humanity. Hopefully Cuomo's ridiculously positive approval ratings are a reflection that the masses aren't aware of his behavior.
It’s criminal that the left wing media are idolizing Cuomo when he has killed more people with his terrible decisions than just about anyone other than the Chinese Premier. Then they attack Desantis, the guy who has produced incredible results in a State loaded with at risk retirees.....
 

MustangPokeFan

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#57
It’s criminal that the left wing media are idolizing Cuomo when he has killed more people with his terrible decisions than just about anyone other than the Chinese Premier. Then they attack Desantis, the guy who has produced incredible results in a State loaded with at risk retirees.....
Try throwing out New York City Metro and compare New York state with Florida.
OK, then we’ll throw out Miami, Orlando and The Villages.

Ridiculous argument......throw out the most populated city, yup that’s a Democrat thought process alright. The fact is Florida may not have an NYC but across the State they have far more large cities than New York. Try focusing on the different approaches between the two Governors and the drastically different results.
 

StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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#58
OK, then we’ll throw out Miami, Orlando and The Villages.

Ridiculous argument......throw out the most populated city, yup that’s a Democrat thought process alright. The fact is Florida may not have an NYC but across the State they have far more large cities than New York. Try focusing on the different approaches between the two Governors and the drastically different results.
Far from a ridiculous argument. New York City is easily the most densely packed city in the country. A Republican governor and/or mayor would have also found it difficult to handle and might had made out even worse from not thinking the shutdown needed to be as severe. For now, New York is doing a more consistent job than Florida in making cases and deaths go down.
 
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wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#59
I

I understand wanting a sense of normalcy. And some of the restrictions are mind-numbingly frustrating. No one likes being on house arrest; it's part of the reason groundings and house arrests are punishments.
.
House arrest is annoying but I'm a couch potato anyway so it's not the end of the world. The bigger issue is closing businesses and destroying livelihoods.

The restrictions aren't just "frustrating", they are unconstitutional and devastating to the economy. In a year or so many will understand why trashing the economy was kind of a big deal. States are going to have to figure out how to pay 100's of thousands of people on unemployment with 100's of thousands fewer people paying into the system. That's going to get real one of these days.
You've got states talking about putting ankle trackers on people that test positive.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Oct 29, 2016
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#60
You've got states talking about putting ankle trackers on people that test positive.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
That obviously will not happen. The ankle monitor and app to track those with covid-19 ideas were made when everyone thought many more people were going to die than the number that sadly did die. Even if a state passed a bill requiring ankle/app monitor, supreme Court would obviously conclude that such a bill is unconstitutional.