NCAA Athletics Post-COVID

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Jul 25, 2018
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#1
https://www.si.com/college/2020/04/08/college-football-future-2020-ncaa-coronavirus

Interesting story on how power brokers throughout college athletics see the impact of the virus.

Will there be a football season? If not, will it lead to the formation of superconferences? How does a school like Tulsa, for instance, survive this?

Over the last two weeks, about two dozen school administrators and a host of industry experts spoke to Sports Illustrated to answer four pressing college sports questions amid the coronavirus pandemic: 1) When can on-campus practice begin? 2) What are the options for a football season? 3) How significant is football to athletic departments? 4) And how would athletic departments recover from a loss in football revenue? “The discussion that ADs are having about fall sports being canceled is a very real possibility,” says Ramogi Huma, the president of the National College Players Association. “It’s extremely hard to imagine any football in the fall on any level.”

A total or partial loss of the sport could send some athletic departments so deep into the red that one administrator predicted even Power 5 football programs shuttering. But the absence of football is only one piece. The long-term and severe financial impacts from an economic recession could not only reform forever how departments operate but also could spell sweeping changes to the landscape of college athletics—from the formation of a super division to a new wave of conference realignment, from money-saving travel modifications to football scheduling alterations, from discontinued sports to thousands of lost jobs.

Meanwhile, more schools each day are moving their summer classes exclusively online. At least 18 Power 5 programs have already made that announcement, including blue bloods Texas, LSU, Ohio State and Oklahoma. Can you have on-campus athletic activities—say, football workouts in July or early August—without having students in class? “If it's too dangerous for kids to be on campus, how would it be O.K. to play football?” says USC athletic director Mike Bohn. Not all agree. Tanner believes athletes could return before other students if it is deemed safe enough, and Texas A&M president Michael Young suggests that athletes could practice if there is teamwide virus testing. “Right now the tests take some periods of time to get back,” Young said. “If we could do that quicker, you could imagine getting the whole football team together, an (academic) class together, and test you all and see you are all O.K. and then you can all gather. That is conceivable.”

Decision-makers who spoke to SI point to more practical options. Those include a truncated season, potentially with conference games only, that begins in October; a full season that starts in October, pushing bowl season to January and the playoff to February; and a season in which attendance is limited or altogether nonexistent.

Athletic directors view scheduling and travel as key money-saving areas. One Group of Five athletic director suggests trimming Olympic sports’ competitions, and another says multi-team, neutral-site round-robin events could pop up for non-revenue sports. Even football scheduling might see some long-term effects in two ways: 1) fewer games against Group of Five programs, as to avoid guarantees stretching into the millions; and 2) fewer long road trips for non-conference games to avoid travel costs. The average price to fly a football team in a charter plane is roughly $120,000, administrators say
 
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Well

This is how I spend time.
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Dec 17, 2009
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#3
"Young and the Aggies have something else to worry about, too: donations. The economy is hammering businesses, including those operated by big-money boosters. For A&M, tucked in the heart of big oil and gas country, that’s especially significant. At most Power 5 programs, donations are usually responsible for about 25% of revenue. At A&M, it’s more than 40%. The Aggies got more than $90 million from donors last year, much of it from oil tycoons."
"A month into virus-related shutdowns, some schools are already seeing a drop-off. One Pac-12 school, for instance, was expecting upward of $20 million in contributions as part of this fiscal year. It’s no longer coming. “If you can salvage the TV money [and play without fans], can you go to your donors and say, ‘This is an extraordinary time, can you stay with us through this?’” one AD asks. “Then you try to reward them later. The problem is, I don’t know when you catch up on that.”

This is messed up priorities. Business should be taking care of their employees, and if there is discretionary money left over, then used to buy and donate materials for ventilators, masks, PPEs, etc. Especially, if there is a second wave of this shit.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#4
https://www.tulsaworld.com/sports/c...cle_0008cd82-69ae-5e6c-b9b6-f4ec3ff10009.html

I consulted David Ridpath, the Ohio University sports administration professor and advocate for college athletes’ welfare as president of the Drake Group, for Sunday’s column on the pandemic as a threat to the NCAA amateur model.
We talked about that for a bit, and then Ridpath said: “My big worry in this, and it’s already started, is that schools are going to do a knee-jerk reaction and start dropping sports as an excuse to say, ‘Oh my god, we need to save money.’ That doesn’t need to happen. There is plenty of other fat to cut.”
Old Dominion dropped wrestling April 2. In a more publicized move, Cincinnati cut men’s soccer last Tuesday.
American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco addressed Cincinnati’s decision on the ESPN-syndicated Paul Finebaum show last week, saying: “It’s a concern, although in talking to (Cincinnati officials), this is something they might have done without the pandemic.”
“I think he’s trying to cover somewhat,” Ridpath said. “Cincinnati, from all of the numbers I’ve seen, is going to save less than a million dollars from this (ESPN reported Bearcats men’s soccer lost $726,498 according to the university’s most recent financial report). Cincinnati is one of those schools that’s a wannabe and probably needs to reassess where they are in the football landscape. And rather than trying to be something that they’re not, they could easily cut recruiting for football. They can cut football support staff. They can cut a lot of things before cutting a sport.
“So I think that that’s a convenient excuse for Aresco and others to use. To say that they were thinking about it... They’re always thinking about it because athletic directors want to maximize whatever they can for football even if it’s folly.”
 

OrangeFan69

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#5
https://www.tulsaworld.com/sports/c...cle_0008cd82-69ae-5e6c-b9b6-f4ec3ff10009.html

I consulted David Ridpath, the Ohio University sports administration professor and advocate for college athletes’ welfare as president of the Drake Group, for Sunday’s column on the pandemic as a threat to the NCAA amateur model.
We talked about that for a bit, and then Ridpath said: “My big worry in this, and it’s already started, is that schools are going to do a knee-jerk reaction and start dropping sports as an excuse to say, ‘Oh my god, we need to save money.’ That doesn’t need to happen. There is plenty of other fat to cut.”
Old Dominion dropped wrestling April 2. In a more publicized move, Cincinnati cut men’s soccer last Tuesday.
American Athletic Conference commissioner Mike Aresco addressed Cincinnati’s decision on the ESPN-syndicated Paul Finebaum show last week, saying: “It’s a concern, although in talking to (Cincinnati officials), this is something they might have done without the pandemic.”
“I think he’s trying to cover somewhat,” Ridpath said. “Cincinnati, from all of the numbers I’ve seen, is going to save less than a million dollars from this (ESPN reported Bearcats men’s soccer lost $726,498 according to the university’s most recent financial report). Cincinnati is one of those schools that’s a wannabe and probably needs to reassess where they are in the football landscape. And rather than trying to be something that they’re not, they could easily cut recruiting for football. They can cut football support staff. They can cut a lot of things before cutting a sport.
“So I think that that’s a convenient excuse for Aresco and others to use. To say that they were thinking about it... They’re always thinking about it because athletic directors want to maximize whatever they can for football even if it’s folly.”
I mean, I'm waiting for this to pass to let go of an employee in my group whose attitude had gone to garbage for the last 18 months. I am keeping them on furlough -we also paid everyone 10 extra vacation days that didn't touch their balance - so they can maintain benefits during the break; and it would be awesome if they resigned anyway; but as soon as we can re-open; we are using this time to reorganize. It's a private school so we're forced to close anyway right now.
 

Rack

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#6
Considering the Phase one that we are entering...very soon in Oklahoma...I don't think Gundy's timeline and idea's are going to be far off at all when push comes to shove.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
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Jun 24, 2005
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#7
"post covid"? Next thing you're going to try to tell me April will actually end some day.
 
Jan 14, 2006
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Hopefully the ncaa lets teams make up the practices they missed during the spring. Maybe 10 practices with coaches in June/July.

I think Rattay can help Sanders take that next step. If he does, we're gonna be dangerous.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#9
Hopefully the ncaa lets teams make up the practices they missed during the spring. Maybe 10 practices with coaches in June/July.

I think Rattay can help Sanders take that next step. If he does, we're gonna be dangerous.
It'll be interesting to see where schools are at in the process by June. Will most have decided they'll have students on campus by fall? I don't think you can even think about asking athletes to return if that decision hasn't been made.
 
Jun 28, 2011
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If they play in an empty stadium hopefully they can find a way to get the band in their. That would add some atmosphere to the games.

Have them use the entire end zone and sit 6 feet apart.
 

Rack

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#12
If they play in an empty stadium hopefully they can find a way to get the band in their. That would add some atmosphere to the games.

Have them use the entire end zone and sit 6 feet apart.
I doubt they will have to play to empty stadiums...that wouldn't make sense...college football is about the crowd...maybe they only fill half for the first game and then trickle in everyone else after that but who knows
 

Rack

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#13
Sorry burner, my friend, but that's incorrect, just looked at the article and the video and it's 80 of 130 AD's not 80% and 99% of all 130 AD's think the college football season will happen at some point during the fall school year. Basically the 80 that think it will be delayed think it will start in October, November at latest.
 
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Jul 25, 2018
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#14
No, just looked at the article and the video and it's 80 of 130 AD's not 80% and 99% think the season will happen at some point during the fall school year. The 80 that think it will be delayed think it will start in October, November at latest.
You're right, my bad.

I still say if there are no students on campus, there'll be no college football.

The NFL's a billion dollar industry with professionals, they'll figure something out. College athletics will follow what goes for the whole student body.
 

Rack

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#15
You're right, my bad.

I still say if there are no students on campus, there'll be no college football.

The NFL's a billion dollar industry with professionals, they'll figure something out. College athletics will follow what goes for the whole student body.
Your guess is as good as mine but I can't see fall college classes on campus being totally canceled. However, I didn't think we would pull a draconian shut down and we did...so who knows?
 
Sep 23, 2010
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The new data coming out from multiple antibody testing is positive as it shows the death rate isn't as high as projected. But, the goal posts keep getting moved on getting out of lock down. At first, it was just so our hospitals wouldn't get overwhelmed. Now, it's like one person can't die from opening up. If the goal posts keep getting moved, then it could be tough to have a season. It seems crazy but what we are doing right now seems crazy.
 
Jan 14, 2006
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The new data coming out from multiple antibody testing is positive as it shows the death rate isn't as high as projected. But, the goal posts keep getting moved on getting out of lock down. At first, it was just so our hospitals wouldn't get overwhelmed. Now, it's like one person can't die from opening up. If the goal posts keep getting moved, then it could be tough to have a season. It seems crazy but what we are doing right now seems crazy.
Agree on all points. College kids are at nearly zero risk. Shutting down school will do much more damage in my opinion.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#18
Agree on all points. College kids are at nearly zero risk. Shutting down school will do much more damage in my opinion.
The sticky point, imo, is gonna be the fact they're coming to a place like Stillwater, or Boulder, from all over the country & world (though I think international enrollment will plummet this fall), & interacting with not just other college students.
 
Jan 14, 2006
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The sticky point, imo, is gonna be the fact they're coming to a place like Stillwater, or Boulder, from all over the country & world (though I think international enrollment will plummet this fall), & interacting with not just other college students.
Yeah. Plus the residual fear factor will cause people to make strange decisions.

Hopefully the new data will continue to be positive and drive decisions but who knows. I know I really need sports for my sanity.
 

Rack

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#20
The new data coming out from multiple antibody testing is positive as it shows the death rate isn't as high as projected. But, the goal posts keep getting moved on getting out of lock down. At first, it was just so our hospitals wouldn't get overwhelmed. Now, it's like one person can't die from opening up. If the goal posts keep getting moved, then it could be tough to have a season. It seems crazy but what we are doing right now seems crazy.
Moving goalpost are political...and that element of this needs to die and now.