Millennial's - Should we cut them some slack?

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May 21, 2007
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#1
A Random Thought of the Day... feel free to disagree.

Zac Robinson's recollection of Columbine got me thinking about Millennials and didn't want to hijack that thread. Apparently i fall into this category although I am not sure I identify with them and i am toward the beginning of agreed upon start year.

There are a lot of people on this board that don't care for millennials, i sure don't care for some the entitlement issues.

But I started thinking about the events that define generations. The Greatest Generation (Traditionalist) has Great Depression, WWII. Baby Boomers have the Cold War, 60's, Vietnam, Kennedy and Civil Right Movement. Generation X - collapse of USSR and technology boom.

Most people define Millennials as around 1980 - mid 90's, lets say 1998.

Okay, this whole next comparison is simply a relative comparison. I have the upmost respect for the generations before me. I did not experience these events so my comparisons maybe way out of line... meant no disrespect.

I am starting in early/mid 1990's since a person needs to be old enough for a emotional response.

1991 - Persian Gulf War (Traditionalist - Korean War)
1991 - now - Police Brutality against Minorities (Baby Boomers - Civil Rights Movement)*
1995 - OKC Bombing (no comparison)
1999, 2007, 2012 - now - Columbine, Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook (no comparison)*
2001 - 9/11 (Traditionalist - Pearl Harbor or no comparison)
2003 - ? - Iraq War and middle east instability (Baby Boomer - Vietnam)*
2008 - Great Recession (Traditionalist - Great Depression).stretch, but with no bailout probably would have been a lot bigger*

Some of the above might have been a stretch but just for discussion purposes. What is scary is 4* of those are still ongoing with no end in sight.

I think what separates the previous generations is the ability to wrap up events. WWII, Vietnam, the Great Depression, 60's, Civil Rights movement all have relative start dates and end dates.

My point is this. While relative in scale, in addition to unprecedented events, it appears that millennial's have experienced the events of 3 generations in less than one (all of them televised in color and now HD). In addition, a lot of those events have yet to have a resolution in sight and appear to be getting worse.

My question to OP, based on the above, should we cut millennials a little slack?
 

#1 Pokes Fan

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#2



This is why they don't get a break from me. Today, everything is somebody else's fault, everybody gets a participation trophy, you can't keep score in little league sports because somebody may lose, and shame on you if you say anything they don't agree with. Toughen up! I'm glad I'm almost 50 years old and probably won't have to see the state of this country in another 50 years. Just my two cents.
 

oks10

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#3
Wouldn't the group that's doing the most complaining right now (late high schoolers/college goers) be in the generation AFTER millennials? Being born in '86, that puts me right in the middle of the millennial generation but it feels like people in the spotlight right now aren't of my generation. They're the generation behind me, the "post-millennials" or Gen Z. I'm by definition a millennial but to me it seems people are mislabeling "millennials" because I (and many others my age) don't fit that group being complained about.
 
Mar 9, 2004
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#4



This is why they don't get a break from me. Today, everything is somebody else's fault, everybody gets a participation trophy, you can't keep score in little league sports because somebody may lose, and shame on you if you say anything they don't agree with. Toughen up! I'm glad I'm almost 50 years old and probably won't have to see the state of this country in another 50 years. Just my two cents.
So, let me get this straight. Parents and teachers create an environment where no child experiences failure or adversity, and then you blame the children when they grow up to feel entitled? This is entirely the fault of previous generations.
 

MindAflame

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#5
So, let me get this straight. Parents and teachers create an environment where no child experiences failure or adversity, and then you blame the children when they grow up to feel entitled? This is entirely the fault of previous generations.
Or it's the "fault" of elements within both previous and Millennial generations; shifts in technology, politics, and media; the influence of marketing on perception.
 

Deere Poke

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#6
Wouldn't the group that's doing the most complaining right now (late high schoolers/college goers) be in the generation AFTER millennials? Being born in '86, that puts me right in the middle of the millennial generation but it feels like people in the spotlight right now aren't of my generation. They're the generation behind me, the "post-millennials" or Gen Z. I'm by definition a millennial but to me it seems people are mislabeling "millennials" because I (and many others my age) don't fit that group being complained about.
What about all the 35 year old's still living in Moms basement.
 

oks10

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#7
What about all the 35 year old's still living in Moms basement.
While I know there is more than just what I'm personally exposed to, all the 30+ yr olds that I know are out living on their own with jobs and many with families. Not to say that actual millennials haven't had their share of embarrassment (looking at you Occupy Movement...), I just think that we're starting to blend into the next generation while still calling them millennials.
 

AshlandFlash

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#8
So, let me get this straight. Parents and teachers create an environment where no child experiences failure or adversity, and then you blame the children when they grow up to feel entitled? This is entirely the fault of previous generations.
This is the point. It's always someone else's fault.

My dad was 16 when WWII ended. So, he dropped out of 8th grade, and started earning a living. Helped comb through the wreckage after the Texas City explosion and fire. Scratched out a living, and made a life for himself. Helped a lot of other people get started.

He didn't blame other people for being dirt poor, he just worked a job, farmed, built houses on the side, and in his spare time, helped out the neighbors. Hell of an example. He didn't need a safe place when he was 18. That's why they call them the Greatest Generation. Those of us who were their Children are the Baby Boomers. We needed to teach our kids better. Those are Gen X. They had it easier than us, but some of them were taught independence. Then we had millennials, and now nobody is responsible.

It's everybody's fault. If you are sitting around complaining, instead of taking care of things, it's your fault too. If you bought into the hype that today's kids can't handle bad stuff, then it's your fault. If you think we need to "make America great again," then you better look around and find a place that's better, and move there, this place has always been pretty great, mostly because we have the inalienable right to screw up, then try to make it right.

Alright that's enough ranting, You Danged Kids Get Off My Lawn!
 

Deere Poke

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#9
While I know there is more than just what I'm personally exposed to, all the 30+ yr olds that I know are out living on their own with jobs and many with families. Not to say that actual millennials haven't had their share of embarrassment (looking at your Occupy Movement...), I just think that we're starting to blend into the next generation while still calling them millennials.
Haven't been in other regions of the country enough but hear about a lot of it going on from people I know around the country.

Can't really blame millennial's on that. Good jobs have been hard to come by since millenial's have hit the work force.
 

ksupoke

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#10
Can't really blame millennial's on that. Good jobs have been hard to come by since millenial's have hit the work force.
There’s a huge shortage of tradesmen, mechanics, plumbers, etc...many making (by putting in the work) close to or over 6 figures, what I think you mean to say is there aren’t that many jobs paying what their parents (who probably have 20plys yrs on the job market) are making first year out of college with a LA degree.
 

Jostate

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#11
A Random Thought of the Day... feel free to disagree.

Zac Robinson's recollection of Columbine got me thinking about Millennials and didn't want to hijack that thread. Apparently i fall into this category although I am not sure I identify with them and i am toward the beginning of agreed upon start year.

There are a lot of people on this board that don't care for millennials, i sure don't care for some the entitlement issues.

But I started thinking about the events that define generations. The Greatest Generation (Traditionalist) has Great Depression, WWII. Baby Boomers have the Cold War, 60's, Vietnam, Kennedy and Civil Right Movement. Generation X - collapse of USSR and technology boom.

Most people define Millennials as around 1980 - mid 90's, lets say 1998.

Okay, this whole next comparison is simply a relative comparison. I have the upmost respect for the generations before me. I did not experience these events so my comparisons maybe way out of line... meant no disrespect.

I am starting in early/mid 1990's since a person needs to be old enough for a emotional response.

1991 - Persian Gulf War (Traditionalist - Korean War)
1991 - now - Police Brutality against Minorities (Baby Boomers - Civil Rights Movement)*
1995 - OKC Bombing (no comparison)
1999, 2007, 2012 - now - Columbine, Virginia Tech and Sandy Hook (no comparison)*
2001 - 9/11 (Traditionalist - Pearl Harbor or no comparison)
2003 - ? - Iraq War and middle east instability (Baby Boomer - Vietnam)*
2008 - Great Recession (Traditionalist - Great Depression).stretch, but with no bailout probably would have been a lot bigger*

Some of the above might have been a stretch but just for discussion purposes. What is scary is 4* of those are still ongoing with no end in sight.

I think what separates the previous generations is the ability to wrap up events. WWII, Vietnam, the Great Depression, 60's, Civil Rights movement all have relative start dates and end dates.

My point is this. While relative in scale, in addition to unprecedented events, it appears that millennial's have experienced the events of 3 generations in less than one (all of them televised in color and now HD). In addition, a lot of those events have yet to have a resolution in sight and appear to be getting worse.

My question to OP, based on the above, should we cut millennials a little slack?
This generation "experiences" far more events thanks to an exponential amount of news. The world is safer and more prosperous than it was in the past, we just don't think it is because of constant news feeds of the latest crisis. Maybe a side point to the issue you are raising, but it contributes to this perception that the world is a worse place than it really is. Most millennials have it pretty good but think they are inheriting a world gone mad.
 
Oct 7, 2008
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#13
There’s a huge shortage of tradesmen, mechanics, plumbers, etc...many making (by putting in the work) close to or over 6 figures, what I think you mean to say is there aren’t that many jobs paying what their parents (who probably have 20plys yrs on the job market) are making first year out of college with a LA degree.
Mike Rowe 4 Prezident.
 

SLVRBK

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#14
This generation "experiences" far more events thanks to an exponential amount of news. The world is safer and more prosperous than it was in the past, we just don't think it is because of constant news feeds of the latest crisis. Maybe a side point to the issue you are raising, but it contributes to this perception that the world is a worse place than it really is. Most millennials have it pretty good but think they are inheriting a world gone mad.
There was a study "several years" ago and what they learned was that by the time a kid became a teen that their exposure to "experiences" by 16 was equivalent to what the previous generation had experienced by 26. News feeds, readily accessible information, entertainment, porn, etc is easy to access and permeates every aspect of our lives.
 
May 21, 2007
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#15
Some good points above. Thought of something on the way home that defines this generation. The wealth gap between the .01%, 1% and 10% and the remaining 90% is climbing at a rate so fast that getting hard to even measure.

I can understand why some of them are jaded.
 

wrenhal

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#16
While I know there is more than just what I'm personally exposed to, all the 30+ yr olds that I know are out living on their own with jobs and many with families. Not to say that actual millennials haven't had their share of embarrassment (looking at your Occupy Movement...), I just think that we're starting to blend into the next generation while still calling them millennials.
Haven't been in other regions of the country enough but hear about a lot of it going on from people I know around the country.

Can't really blame millennial's on that. Good jobs have been hard to come by since millenial's have hit the work force.
Well, as older generations leave the workforce there's about to be a glut of jobs in the next decade because there aren't enough kids being born starting in the eighties to keep up with them. Birth replacement tested have been on the downward trend for a few decades now. We aren't as bad as Europe yet, but getting there.

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Apr 14, 2017
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#17
I cut the millennials a lot of slack and the challenges they face are enormous compared to myself 20 years ago when I graduated from OSU.

Baby boomers are by far the most selfish generation. Given everything they wanted but saved hardly anything and racking up huge amounts of debt that my generation and those after me will be paying for. I’m 43 and part of generation x. The college graduates of today have to borrow large amounts for school and enter the workforce in debt where a large % of baby boomers are still working.
 

wrenhal

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#18
Some good points above. Thought of something on the way home that defines this generation. The wealth gap between the .01%, 1% and 10% and the remaining 90% is climbing at a rate so fast that getting hard to even measure.

I can understand why some of them are jaded.
Except the 90% are better off than they were generations ago. So while the 'wealth gap' is greater, they are still better off even if not in that top ten percent.

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steross

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#19
There’s a huge shortage of tradesmen, mechanics, plumbers, etc...many making (by putting in the work) close to or over 6 figures, what I think you mean to say is there aren’t that many jobs paying what their parents (who probably have 20plys yrs on the job market) are making first year out of college with a LA degree.
Yep.

But, I really think this falls on American society more than the kid. In Australia, kids can stop going to high school at the end of year ten and go to TAFE- essentially Vo-Tec. And, while that is sort of available in the US, in Australia it is not just the stoners and kids that might have otherwise dropped out that do it. It is normal, expected for a huge number of intelligent kids, and not looked down upon as "you didn't go to school."

In the US, we act like this is somewhat of a failure.

And, BTW, it is an incredibly smart thing to do. An example. I have hardwood floors in my kitchen and needed them redone. I was talking with the guy that did them. I live on the beach. He lives up the hill in a bigger house that overlooks my house on the beach. I started earning money at nearly 30 years old. He started at 18. I probably make more, but he got a huge head start. And, if done right and you are smart enough to run the company and eventually employ others, you can kick the tail of the average college degree wage earner in lifetime income and accomplishment.
 

ksupoke

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#20
All the excuses on here are the problem and yes they are nothing but excuses for the behavior of children. Granted some of these children are 30+ but that doesn’t change that they are children. A child wants what a child wants if the parent gives in that’s not on the child that’s on the parent. Having said that, the indoctrination centers our children attend from childhood to adulthood haven’t done us any favors.