Marijuana discussion

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
12,034
16,365
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#1
There are an awful lot of intelligent and thoughtful people on this board, that is not meant in any sarcastic manner. So I wanted to see if we could have a reasonable discussion on this topic.

Do you support legalization if so what amount of regulation / gvt oversight would you like to see
Do you support decriminalization
Do you support for medicinal purposes (not saying there are or aren't legitimate purposes, just asking)
Are you totally against any legalization of marijuana
Should this be totally left to the states or is is a federal matter.

Civil debate is appreciated but not mandatory.

Now let's get ready to rrrrrrrruuuuuummmmmmbbbbbbllllllllleeeeee!
 

NYC Poke

The Veil of Ignorance
A/V Subscriber
Sep 24, 2007
38,272
45,441
1,743
#2
Consider me a conservative. I see no need for government interference in the free market for an essentially harmless activity.
 
Oct 16, 2010
221
109
93
#3
It should be legal. Its no more harmful than tobacco or alcohol. As a matter of fact due to its medicinal benefits such as relief of symptoms from chemo treatment it is probably less harmful. It should be regulated like alcohol. 21+ to be able to buy. It would also lessen the burden on the prison system in the USA. Not only would we as a country save money from not locking these people up, there would be billions of dollars in tax revenue.

Now many people will say that marijuana is a gateway drug to other more harmful drugs. That has been disproven by many studies. All you have to do is google it and you will find numerous articles and studies showing the falacy in the gateway drug theory.
 

jobob85

Alcoholistic Sage
A/V Subscriber
Mar 11, 2009
20,796
26,371
743
#5
Legalized and managed by the government like tobacco and alcohol.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
17,206
13,246
1,743
#6
The thead Townie has been waiting for all these years? Somebody text him.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
17,206
13,246
1,743
#7
Consider me converted. It's like the gay marriage thing. Other than the world's going to hell in a handbasket argument, I can't really defend my position well enough to hold it.

I am concerned though that there may be significantly more people with lives negatively impacted by increased usage. I don't just mean the user but others around them. But hey, booze is bad too and we need the tax dollars, so why not.
 

naranjaynegro

Territorial Marshal
Oct 20, 2003
7,140
1,207
1,743
59
Houston area
Visit site
#8
I'm more concerned about how current laws are conributing to the overpopulation of our prisons than anything else. Morally, I don't like the idea of it being legal but really, if tobacco and alcohol are legal.....marijuana should be as well. Better we can tax/regulate it.

Seems like the tide has turned on this issue by a lot of conservative people (outside of that right wing radical, NYPoke:) ) not sure why the politicians are slow to get the message on this.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
A/V Subscriber
Jun 24, 2005
17,206
13,246
1,743
#9
It should be legal. Its no more harmful than tobacco or alcohol. As a matter of fact due to its medicinal benefits such as relief of symptoms from chemo treatment it is probably less harmful. It should be regulated like alcohol. 21+ to be able to buy. It would also lessen the burden on the prison system in the USA. Not only would we as a country save money from not locking these people up, there would be billions of dollars in tax revenue.

Now many people will say that marijuana is a gateway drug to other more harmful drugs. That has been disproven by many studies. All you have to do is google it and you will find numerous articles and studies showing the falacy in the gateway drug theory.
A couple of counter points. I don't think they really "lock up" many people for smoking pot. If you went down to big Mac and asked around I doubt there are many people in there because they had a j in the ashtray when they got pulled over.

Also, you may be right about the gateway drug thing but I suspect that's even harder to find an unbiased study than googling "global warming" to see if that's true or not.
 

Slugger926

Federal Marshal
Oct 19, 2004
11,704
1,676
1,743
#10
This goes for most things where we need to streamline and make punishments both cost effective and more humane (less mental torture). We need to either legalize or use quick cheap executions.
 

NYC Poke

The Veil of Ignorance
A/V Subscriber
Sep 24, 2007
38,272
45,441
1,743
#15
I'm more concerned about how current laws are conributing to the overpopulation of our prisons than anything else. Morally, I don't like the idea of it being legal but really, if tobacco and alcohol are legal.....marijuana should be as well. Better we can tax/regulate it.

Seems like the tide has turned on this issue by a lot of conservative people (outside of that right wing radical, NYPoke:) ) not sure why the politicians are slow to get the message on this.
I'm in agreement with you on this. I look at it from the whole cost/benefit analysis. We spend a LOT of money enforcing marijuana laws and I just don't think we're getting the proper bang for our buck. And arguably, the negative effects of a criminal record and prison time far outweigh any negative effects of using marijuana. It's insane.

As for politicians lagging behind public opinion, I'm actually fine with that. I sincerely believe that government should work slowly. Let the people lead.

I also believe that when marijuana legalization comes (and it will) it will need to be a Republican taking the lead. Democrats are too vulnerable to accusations of being soft on crime and other liberal atrocities. And nobody will ever get elected on a "Free the Herb" platform.
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
12,034
16,365
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#16
Gvt hypocrisy in action.
Not a judgement on legal or illegal just the hypocrisy that surrounds it.

In NYC it is decriminalized for small amounts - I don't know the limits.
But it is illegal to have it in plain view.
So if a policeman stops you and you have it in your pocket you are ok, but if he asks you to empty your pockets and you comply you can be arrested for having it in plain view. If you don't comply you can be arrested for failure to comply with an officer's command.

images-8.jpeg
 

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
12,034
16,365
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
#17
I'm in agreement with you on this. I look at it from the whole cost/benefit analysis. We spend a LOT of money enforcing marijuana laws and I just don't think we're getting the proper bang for our buck. And arguably, the negative effects of a criminal record and prison time far outweigh any negative effects of using marijuana. It's insane.

As for politicians lagging behind public opinion, I'm actually fine with that. I sincerely believe that government should work slowly. Let the people lead.

I also believe that when marijuana legalization comes (and it will) it will need to be a Republican taking the lead. Democrats are too vulnerable to accusations of being soft on crime and other liberal atrocities. And nobody will ever get elected on a "Free the Herb" platform.
Ron Paul is trying
 

NYC Poke

The Veil of Ignorance
A/V Subscriber
Sep 24, 2007
38,272
45,441
1,743
#19
Puerto Rico isn't a state, yet.
True story time.

A while back I worked on a case defending a company after one of its pipelines exploded in a suburb of San Juan. It was tragic, about 30 people died and around 80 had injuries serious enough to require hospitalization. And about 1500 individual lawsuits were filed against us.

Despite the carnage, I really liked working on that case. Puerto Ricans are among the most polite, fun-loving people. I was constantly entertained, and often in a "WTF?" fashion. I could go on and on with the crazy stories.

Anyway, I started reading up on PR for my own edification. Puerto Ricans consider themselves American, but better because they're Puerto Rican. They like America, but they also like themselves.

Some years back they had a plebicite on statehood. The options, more or less, were Become a State, Maintain Status Quo, Become an Independent Nation, and some other combinations of the above. One of the options was "None of The Above."

"None of the Above" won.
 

jobob85

Alcoholistic Sage
A/V Subscriber
Mar 11, 2009
20,796
26,371
743
#20
What about all the dealers that will be put out of work. At least those jobs are not part of the employment numbers to start with.