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okstate987

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#22
Why are you surprised about the Trump result. Policy wise he's done a lot of libertarian things.
Trump is the opposite of a Libertarian
By Staff on March 28, 2018 in Features

During the 2016 presidential campaign, some libertarian-leaning voters wanted to give Donald Trump the benefit of the doubt. As a candidate, Trump talked about drastic reductions in spending and taxation, along with “draining the swamp” of its career politicians. He said he wanted to reduce spending for defense of other countries and wars of foreign intervention. He even leaned toward allowing states to determine their own marijuana policies. Whatever libertarian impulses Trump the candidate seemed to have, though, his actual performance as president stands in stark contrast. Donald Trump is the opposite of a Libertarian.

During his campaign, Trump said he was “in favor of medical marijuana 100 percent,” and that recreational marijuana policy should be left to the states. On that issue, he sounded moderately libertarian. Once elected, Trump appointed Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general. Sessions promptly rescinded the Barack Obama–era Cole Memorandum, a directive from former Deputy Attorney General James Cole that had effectively prevented the federal government from initiating marijuana prosecutions in states that had legalized cannabis.

On March 19, Trump first called for the death penalty to be used against some drug dealers. Sessions took the cue and ran with it.

”At the Department of Justice, we have made ending the drug epidemic a priority,” Sessions said. “We will continue to aggressively prosecute drug traffickers and we will use federal law to seek the death penalty wherever appropriate.”

When Trump visited the Philippines last fall, he went out of his way to praise the tyrannical President Rodrigo Duterte, calling him by his first name and saying they ”had a great relationship.” Duterte is responsible for his government’s alleged extralegal killing of thousands of drug users and dealers, and who has bragged, “At the age of 16, I already killed someone. Just over a look.” Duterte’s spokesman later claimed that it had been meant as a joke.

“The danger that Trump and Sessions pose to peaceful adults who choose to self-medicate or recreate with drugs is no joke,” said Libertarian National Committee Executive Director Wes Benedict. “It’s certainly not libertarian, and it’s offensive to the vast majority of Americans.”

As a presidential candidate, Trump complained that the United States spends too much money on the defense of South Korea, Japan, and NATO countries. He threatened to withdraw troops stationed at the demilitarized zone on the border of North Korea and elsewhere in Asia unless Japan and South Korea increased their compensation for keeping troops there. Trump also threatened to refuse aid for NATO countries that didn’t pay their proscribed 2 percent of GDP to fund NATO. Those all sounded like baby steps in a libertarian direction.

Once elected, what did Trump do? For starters, he got involved in an insult-trading competition with Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s dictator. He named Rep. Mike Pompeo as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and then as secretary of state — the same Pompeo who refers to the National Security Agency’s surveillance operations as ”good and important work,” and who wants to keep the Guantanamo Bay detention camp open. Pompeo has called for “regime change” in Iran and North Korea, which is political jargon for warfare, and thinks that the Iranian nuclear program can be ended with the use of ”under 2,000 sorties to destroy the Iranian nuclear capacity.”

Pompeo also thinks that whistle-blowing hero Edward Snowden ”should be brought back from Russia and given due process, and I think the proper outcome would be that he would be given a death sentence.” He invoked executive privilege for Gina Haspel so that she would not have to testify in the trials of psychologists Bruce Jessen and James Mitchell for their alleged role in developing the CIA’s torturous “enhanced interrogation techniques.” Oh yes, Trump also recently named that same Gina Haspel to replace Pompeo as new director of the CIA.

In addition, Trump named former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton as national security advisor. Bolton was a strong supporter of the disastrous war in Iraq during the George W. Bush administration, and continues to support it to this day. Bolton advocated “regime change” warfare in Libya, which has resulted in massive ongoing chaos and insurgent violence. Failing to learn his lesson from that fiasco, Bolton wants to try the same thing in both Syria and Iran.

“Libertarians are the party of peaceful trade with all nations and entangling alliances with none,” Benedict said. “Trump’s reckless military aggressiveness and trade wars are quite the opposite.”

Trump, unfortunately, has kept two of his worst campaign promises. He promised that the federal government would ignore the responsibility to live within its means, and fulfilled that promise by drastically increasing military spending and maintaining entitlement spending while he cut taxes. The United States is now on track to run trillion-dollar deficits — $3,070 for every man, woman, and child — every year into the foreseeable future.

Trump also promised us a trade war, and has lived up to that pledge by hiking tariffs that will impoverish the American people by raising prices, destroying our export markets, and spurring foreign retaliation.

“Unfortunately, trade wars lead to hot wars,” Benedict said. “The tariffs and boycotts between World War I and World War II demonstrate that beyond a doubt. We also should have expected that Trump would easily be capable of running trillion-dollar deficits. After all, he does have vast personal experience with bankruptcy.”

Another good article debunking this:
Dd
The American Conservative is a reliable source of thoughtful commentary, and an outlet to which I am happy to contribute on occasion. For these reasons I was prepared to give a fair reading to a Monday article, “Donald Trump: The Most Libertarian President Since Silent Cal,” by Ryan James Girdusky — as much as the headline inclined me otherwise.
Unfortunately, no reading can make Girdusky’s case persuasive. President Trump is not libertarian by any measure, not even the extremely low bar of being the most libertarian-friendly president since Calvin Coolidge. While I welcome Girdusky’s efforts to give credit where it is due, his silence on so much of Trump’s authoritarianism is glaring and fatal to the piece.

I recommend reading the whole article over at The American Conservative before you proceed here, but I’ll quote a few of the most notable excerpts:
To start with, the Trump administration has been rolling back federal regulations at a faster speed than any other first-year president. As of October 12, 469 government rules have been stricken from the books, more than twice and three times the numbers of George W. Bush’s and Barack Obama’s first years respectively.​
This is the strongest argument of the lot. Trump has indeed rolled back hundreds of regulations, and soon after taking office, he ordered that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination, and that the cost of planned regulations be prudently managed and controlled through a budgeting process.” A Competitive Enterprise Institute report found the Trump administration issued 2,183 rules in its first nine months, 18 percent fewer than the Obama administration issued in the same time.
Now, it’s worth noting that many of those 469 withdrawn regulations Girdusky mentions had never taken affect in the first place or will be replaced with different rules, neither of which sounds like real deregulation to me. But yes, all due caveats in place, Trump’s approach to regulation generally strikes me as good news in a country laden with far too many laws.
But is that alone enough to declare Trump in any sense libertarian? Well, let’s look at what else Girdusky writes:

[W]hile Trump isn’t the pacifist that many of his libertarian supporters had hoped he’d be, especially when comes to the war in Afghanistan, his first year in office saw a radical decrease in American involvement in Syria, with an end to aid for CIA-backed rebels in the region. The Trump administration is also conducting the Defense Department’s first-ever audit, which will hopefully lead to fat-trimming from its massive $639 billion budget.​
Again, the Pentagon audit is good news and much overdue. But 1) it is legally required by Congress, so this isn’t a Trumpian innovation, and 2) Trump has promised again and again to inflate military spending beyond its present morass of bloat, waste, and incompetence. That “hopefully” is stretched very, very thin.
More to the point, however, is this a deeply misleading account of Trump’s foreign policy, the most important policy arena for a president. He’s not just “not a pacifist.” He has doubled down on the failures of his predecessors, continued the executive usurpation of war powers, fostered conflict in Eastern Europe, escalated in Yemen, escalated in Afghanistan, escalated with North Korea, and, yes, escalated in Syria.
Before Trump, the United States was engaged in endless war, what military historian Ret. Col. Andrew Bacevich has called “a pattern of promiscuous intervention” in which our “military policy [is] utterly unhinged” and “the term ‘peace’ itself has all but vanished from political discourse.” With Trump, none of that has changed, and you need not be a libertarian or pacifist to see it.

And then there’s this, which is nigh laughable:
Another first is Trump’s move to devolve executive power and restore Congress’s checks and balances. Unlike his predecessor, Trump is not governing through executive fiat and has kicked the ball back to Congress on a number of issues, including DACA, Iran sanctions, Obamacare subsidies, and 15 regulatory nullifications, which is 14 more than all the other presidents combined.​
Trump isn’t governing by executive fiat? Really?
He is so far averaging nearly double former President Obama’s annual tally of executive orders and has the highest annual average since former President Carter. In fact, for all that Obama was rightly criticized for his “pen and phone” presidency, he averaged fewer executive orders per year than any president since Grover Cleveland.
Girdusky also highlights Trump’s friendship with Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), which is hardly an adequate basis for judging a presidency — though if it were, Trump’s friendship with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) probably cancels it out.
Likewise, Girdusky mentions Trump’s judicial appointments, claiming they are mostly “strict constitutionalists.” That may be (I confess I’m skeptical, though Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch has shown very promising views on privacy rights), but it is too soon to judge their contribution to jurisprudence in their present roles. Consider that many SCOTUS justices undergo ideological drift with time.
Finally, there’s all the stuff Girdusky doesn’t mention, like the Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ approach to the drug war and asset forfeiture, or Trump’s gross disinterest in private property rights, or his personal and political crony capitalism, or his outright advocacy of police brutality and militarization.

I’ve said before and will say again that like any politician, Trump should be given credit and cooperation when those are due. But they are rarely due. I doubt libertarians could come to an agreement on how to determine our “best champion since Silent Cal,” but whatever the conclusion may be, Trump in aggregate has shown himself no champion of liberty.
 

Deere Poke

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#23
Trump is the opposite of a Libertarian
By Staff on March 28, 2018 in Features

During the 2016 presidential campaign, some libertarian-leaning voters wanted to give Donald Trump the benefit of the doubt. As a candidate, Trump talked about drastic reductions in spending and taxation, along with “draining the swamp” of its career politicians. He said he wanted to reduce spending for defense of other countries and wars of foreign intervention. He even leaned toward allowing states to determine their own marijuana policies. Whatever libertarian impulses Trump the candidate seemed to have, though, his actual performance as president stands in stark contrast. Donald Trump is the opposite of a Libertarian.

During his campaign, Trump said he was “in favor of medical marijuana 100 percent,” and that recreational marijuana policy should be left to the states. On that issue, he sounded moderately libertarian. Once elected, Trump appointed Sen. Jeff Sessions as attorney general. Sessions promptly rescinded the Barack Obama–era Cole Memorandum, a directive from former Deputy Attorney General James Cole that had effectively prevented the federal government from initiating marijuana prosecutions in states that had legalized cannabis.

On March 19, Trump first called for the death penalty to be used against some drug dealers. Sessions took the cue and ran with it.

”At the Department of Justice, we have made ending the drug epidemic a priority,” Sessions said. “We will continue to aggressively prosecute drug traffickers and we will use federal law to seek the death penalty wherever appropriate.”

When Trump visited the Philippines last fall, he went out of his way to praise the tyrannical President Rodrigo Duterte, calling him by his first name and saying they ”had a great relationship.” Duterte is responsible for his government’s alleged extralegal killing of thousands of drug users and dealers, and who has bragged, “At the age of 16, I already killed someone. Just over a look.” Duterte’s spokesman later claimed that it had been meant as a joke.

“The danger that Trump and Sessions pose to peaceful adults who choose to self-medicate or recreate with drugs is no joke,” said Libertarian National Committee Executive Director Wes Benedict. “It’s certainly not libertarian, and it’s offensive to the vast majority of Americans.”

As a presidential candidate, Trump complained that the United States spends too much money on the defense of South Korea, Japan, and NATO countries. He threatened to withdraw troops stationed at the demilitarized zone on the border of North Korea and elsewhere in Asia unless Japan and South Korea increased their compensation for keeping troops there. Trump also threatened to refuse aid for NATO countries that didn’t pay their proscribed 2 percent of GDP to fund NATO. Those all sounded like baby steps in a libertarian direction.

Once elected, what did Trump do? For starters, he got involved in an insult-trading competition with Kim Jong-un, North Korea’s dictator. He named Rep. Mike Pompeo as Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and then as secretary of state — the same Pompeo who refers to the National Security Agency’s surveillance operations as ”good and important work,” and who wants to keep the Guantanamo Bay detention camp open. Pompeo has called for “regime change” in Iran and North Korea, which is political jargon for warfare, and thinks that the Iranian nuclear program can be ended with the use of ”under 2,000 sorties to destroy the Iranian nuclear capacity.”

Pompeo also thinks that whistle-blowing hero Edward Snowden ”should be brought back from Russia and given due process, and I think the proper outcome would be that he would be given a death sentence.” He invoked executive privilege for Gina Haspel so that she would not have to testify in the trials of psychologists Bruce Jessen and James Mitchell for their alleged role in developing the CIA’s torturous “enhanced interrogation techniques.” Oh yes, Trump also recently named that same Gina Haspel to replace Pompeo as new director of the CIA.

In addition, Trump named former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton as national security advisor. Bolton was a strong supporter of the disastrous war in Iraq during the George W. Bush administration, and continues to support it to this day. Bolton advocated “regime change” warfare in Libya, which has resulted in massive ongoing chaos and insurgent violence. Failing to learn his lesson from that fiasco, Bolton wants to try the same thing in both Syria and Iran.

“Libertarians are the party of peaceful trade with all nations and entangling alliances with none,” Benedict said. “Trump’s reckless military aggressiveness and trade wars are quite the opposite.”

Trump, unfortunately, has kept two of his worst campaign promises. He promised that the federal government would ignore the responsibility to live within its means, and fulfilled that promise by drastically increasing military spending and maintaining entitlement spending while he cut taxes. The United States is now on track to run trillion-dollar deficits — $3,070 for every man, woman, and child — every year into the foreseeable future.

Trump also promised us a trade war, and has lived up to that pledge by hiking tariffs that will impoverish the American people by raising prices, destroying our export markets, and spurring foreign retaliation.

“Unfortunately, trade wars lead to hot wars,” Benedict said. “The tariffs and boycotts between World War I and World War II demonstrate that beyond a doubt. We also should have expected that Trump would easily be capable of running trillion-dollar deficits. After all, he does have vast personal experience with bankruptcy.”

Another good article debunking this:
Dd
The American Conservative is a reliable source of thoughtful commentary, and an outlet to which I am happy to contribute on occasion. For these reasons I was prepared to give a fair reading to a Monday article, “Donald Trump: The Most Libertarian President Since Silent Cal,” by Ryan James Girdusky — as much as the headline inclined me otherwise.
Unfortunately, no reading can make Girdusky’s case persuasive. President Trump is not libertarian by any measure, not even the extremely low bar of being the most libertarian-friendly president since Calvin Coolidge. While I welcome Girdusky’s efforts to give credit where it is due, his silence on so much of Trump’s authoritarianism is glaring and fatal to the piece.

I recommend reading the whole article over at The American Conservative before you proceed here, but I’ll quote a few of the most notable excerpts:
To start with, the Trump administration has been rolling back federal regulations at a faster speed than any other first-year president. As of October 12, 469 government rules have been stricken from the books, more than twice and three times the numbers of George W. Bush’s and Barack Obama’s first years respectively.​
This is the strongest argument of the lot. Trump has indeed rolled back hundreds of regulations, and soon after taking office, he ordered that “for every one new regulation issued, at least two prior regulations be identified for elimination, and that the cost of planned regulations be prudently managed and controlled through a budgeting process.” A Competitive Enterprise Institute report found the Trump administration issued 2,183 rules in its first nine months, 18 percent fewer than the Obama administration issued in the same time.
Now, it’s worth noting that many of those 469 withdrawn regulations Girdusky mentions had never taken affect in the first place or will be replaced with different rules, neither of which sounds like real deregulation to me. But yes, all due caveats in place, Trump’s approach to regulation generally strikes me as good news in a country laden with far too many laws.
But is that alone enough to declare Trump in any sense libertarian? Well, let’s look at what else Girdusky writes:

[W]hile Trump isn’t the pacifist that many of his libertarian supporters had hoped he’d be, especially when comes to the war in Afghanistan, his first year in office saw a radical decrease in American involvement in Syria, with an end to aid for CIA-backed rebels in the region. The Trump administration is also conducting the Defense Department’s first-ever audit, which will hopefully lead to fat-trimming from its massive $639 billion budget.​
Again, the Pentagon audit is good news and much overdue. But 1) it is legally required by Congress, so this isn’t a Trumpian innovation, and 2) Trump has promised again and again to inflate military spending beyond its present morass of bloat, waste, and incompetence. That “hopefully” is stretched very, very thin.
More to the point, however, is this a deeply misleading account of Trump’s foreign policy, the most important policy arena for a president. He’s not just “not a pacifist.” He has doubled down on the failures of his predecessors, continued the executive usurpation of war powers, fostered conflict in Eastern Europe, escalated in Yemen, escalated in Afghanistan, escalated with North Korea, and, yes, escalated in Syria.
Before Trump, the United States was engaged in endless war, what military historian Ret. Col. Andrew Bacevich has called “a pattern of promiscuous intervention” in which our “military policy [is] utterly unhinged” and “the term ‘peace’ itself has all but vanished from political discourse.” With Trump, none of that has changed, and you need not be a libertarian or pacifist to see it.

And then there’s this, which is nigh laughable:
Another first is Trump’s move to devolve executive power and restore Congress’s checks and balances. Unlike his predecessor, Trump is not governing through executive fiat and has kicked the ball back to Congress on a number of issues, including DACA, Iran sanctions, Obamacare subsidies, and 15 regulatory nullifications, which is 14 more than all the other presidents combined.​
Trump isn’t governing by executive fiat? Really?
He is so far averaging nearly double former President Obama’s annual tally of executive orders and has the highest annual average since former President Carter. In fact, for all that Obama was rightly criticized for his “pen and phone” presidency, he averaged fewer executive orders per year than any president since Grover Cleveland.
Girdusky also highlights Trump’s friendship with Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.), which is hardly an adequate basis for judging a presidency — though if it were, Trump’s friendship with Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) probably cancels it out.
Likewise, Girdusky mentions Trump’s judicial appointments, claiming they are mostly “strict constitutionalists.” That may be (I confess I’m skeptical, though Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch has shown very promising views on privacy rights), but it is too soon to judge their contribution to jurisprudence in their present roles. Consider that many SCOTUS justices undergo ideological drift with time.
Finally, there’s all the stuff Girdusky doesn’t mention, like the Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ approach to the drug war and asset forfeiture, or Trump’s gross disinterest in private property rights, or his personal and political crony capitalism, or his outright advocacy of police brutality and militarization.

I’ve said before and will say again that like any politician, Trump should be given credit and cooperation when those are due. But they are rarely due. I doubt libertarians could come to an agreement on how to determine our “best champion since Silent Cal,” but whatever the conclusion may be, Trump in aggregate has shown himself no champion of liberty.
He didn't run as a libertarian and doesn't claim to be a libertarian but has done a lot of libertarian like things. These old articles written by mind readers are pretty funny to read now. As many of the things they penned to prove he wasn't libertarian have swung 180% since they were penned. All the escalated conflicts have now deescalated and resulted in troops coming home. There have been no new wars started. That's a first for a president in a very long time.

He has made the members of NATO start paying their 2%. When Germany didn't he pulled troops out of Germany to match their contribution.

The Deregulation no one is going to argue.

He has pulled us out of trade deals libertarians said we shouldn't have been in to begin with.

There is a reason there aren't a bunch of new articles on this subject in 2020.

1 we all know he didn't run as a libertarian nor did he claim to be one. The other being the authors would have to eat some crow if they updated the article in 2020.
 

okstate987

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#24
He didn't run as a libertarian and doesn't claim to be a libertarian but has done a lot of libertarian like things. These old articles written by mind readers are pretty funny to read now. As many of the things they penned to prove he wasn't libertarian have swung 180% since they were penned. All the escalated conflicts have now deescalated and resulted in troops coming home. There have been no new wars started. That's a first for a president in a very long time.

He has made the members of NATO start paying their 2%. When Germany didn't he pulled troops out of Germany to match their contribution.

The Deregulation no one is going to argue.

He has pulled us out of trade deals libertarians said we shouldn't have been in to begin with.

There is a reason there aren't a bunch of new articles on this subject in 2020.

1 we all know he didn't run as a libertarian nor did he claim to be one. The other being the authors would have to eat some crow if they updated the article in 2020.
1) Making NATO pay more is not a libertarian stance at all. I am not sure why you think that is.
2) Deregulation has not been a cut and dry thing. He has replaced most deregulation by adding something else. This is pretty well documented.
3) Pulling out of trade deals is a libertarian move, but he replaced them with tarriffs, which is about as far from libertarian as it gets. Gotta look at the whole body of work and the entire move to make substantive claims, not parse things out.

Not to be a stereotypical libertarian conducting gatekeeping or anything, but I have noticed a lot of people claim they are libertarian, but their stances on issues are not libertarian at all. They just don't want to be called a conservative as it sounds less cool.
 
Last edited:
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#25
1) Making NATO pay more is not a libertarian stance at all. I am not sure why you think that is.
2) Deregulation has not been a cut and dry thing. He has replaced most deregulation by adding something else. This is pretty well documented.
3) Pulling out of trade deals is a libertarian move, but he replaced them with tarriffs, which is about as far from libertarian as it gets. Gotta look at the whole body of work and the entire move to make substantive claims, not parse things out.

Not to be a stereotypical libertarian conducting gatekeeping or anything, but I have noticed a lot of people claim they are libertarian, but their stances on issues are not libertarian at all. They just don't want to be called a conservative as it sounds less cool.
Making other countries support themselves militarily brings us closer to not being the world's police.That is more libertarian than authoritarian. I would agree that Trump's not a libertarian though.

I have not yet heard from Jorgensen how she would handle the current communist uprising in this country. Using state monopoly of force to crack down on American citizens is very un-libertarian, but what if those citizens are attempting to overthrow the government in favor of a Marxist totalitarian dystopia?
 

Deere Poke

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#26
1) Making NATO pay more is not a libertarian stance at all. I am not sure why you think that is.
2) Deregulation has not been a cut and dry thing. He has replaced most deregulation by adding something else. This is pretty well documented.
3) Pulling out of trade deals is a libertarian move, but he replaced them with tarriffs, which is about as far from libertarian as it gets. Gotta look at the whole body of work and the entire move to make substantive claims, not parse things out.

Not to be a stereotypical libertarian conducting gatekeeping or anything, but I have noticed a lot of people claim they are libertarian, but their stances on issues are not libertarian at all. They just don't want to be called a conservative as it sounds less cool.
I didn't say he was a libertarian only he has done some libertarian things.
 

okstate987

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Making other countries support themselves militarily brings us closer to not being the world's police.That is more libertarian than authoritarian. I would agree that Trump's not a libertarian though.

I have not yet heard from Jorgensen how she would handle the current communist uprising in this country. Using state monopoly of force to crack down on American citizens is very un-libertarian, but what if those citizens are attempting to overthrow the government in favor of a Marxist totalitarian dystopia?
I suppose, but the libertarian position would be to leave NATO altogether. Besides, Trump may be pushing them to pay more for their own defense, but has actually increased military spending.

She hasn't responded to the bolded part because that question is very silly. Where is there a current communist uprising here in the US?

There is an awful lot of crying wolf about marxism and communism that is going to backfire in the long run. This is every bit as rediculous as the left calling the last 2-3 republican presidents a nazi. There are very very few people that fall into those two boats in the United States currently.
 
Jul 22, 2011
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#28
I suppose, but the libertarian position would be to leave NATO altogether. Besides, Trump may be pushing them to pay more for their own defense, but has actually increased military spending.

She hasn't responded to the bolded part because that question is very silly. Where is there a current communist uprising here in the US?

There is an awful lot of crying wolf about marxism and communism that is going to backfire in the long run. This is every bit as rediculous as the left calling the last 2-3 republican presidents a nazi. There are very very few people that fall into those two boats in the United States currently.
That’s the answer I expected. Thanks
 

Deere Poke

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#30
I mean Obama left marijuana up to the states and tried to close guantanamo, but that didn't make him a libertarian either. He was very very far from it.
Trump leans more Libertarian than many past Presidents is the point I was trying to make. That's probably where your political test found common ground with him.
 

llcoolw

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Deere Poke

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That’s pretty dang close on top two. While mine are the same two, the difference between them point wise is large for me.
I would say I'm a conservative libertarian (Republican Liberty Caucus) and very much a Constitutionalist. I agree with the GOP's lip service on the constitution but not what they actually do in practice. I like my drop off after the GOP and Libertarian candidate they are the two ideologies that most line up with the Constitution.

Anyone that scores high on Constitutional issues is going to score high on GOP and Libertarian and low on the more liberal parties.