Lawn Question

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More Cowbell

Territorial Marshal
May 2, 2005
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Highland Village, TX
#21
Question for you guys. I have Bermuda TIF-419 that was sodded 3 years ago. Looks good, but I have never been able to keep it from seeding out. I don't over or under water it, and I don't over or under fertilize it. The pH is spot on. I don't know what could be "stressing it" to provoke the seed heads. I'm tired of it putting it's energy into poking seed heads up instead of getting really dense. Any suggestions?
 
Feb 6, 2007
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Ardmore, Ok.
#22
What is your fertility program? Could be a nitrogen deficiency, or a nitrogen utilization problem that is associated with low phosphorus and/or low potassium indices.
Is it shaded? Bermuda likes full sun.

My suggestion is to do a soil analysis (local Texas Agrilife Extension office), then fertilize accordingly. Short of that, below is a link to an OSU Extension Fact Sheet on lawn management that will provide some generalized fertility practices.

If phosphorus and potassium levels are sufficient, nitrogen should be applied at a rate of 1 unit of Nitrogen (ie., two pounds of 46-0-0 or 10 pounds of 10-20-10) per 1,000 sq. ft. per month.

Phosphorus and potassium should be applied (if needed) about April 15 and Sept. 15 (first and last applications), and straight nitrogen can be applied during the May - Aug. time frame.

http://pods.dasnr.okstate.edu/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-2299/HLA-6420web.pdf
 
Feb 6, 2007
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Ardmore, Ok.
#24
Forgot to mention, if a soil analysis shows phosphorus and/or potassium to be deficient, these nutrients must be added annually until a soil analysis shows them to be sufficient. Whereas nitrogen goes into soil solution rather rapidly, phosphorus and potassium take a long time.
Any time you remove a leaf crop (ie., bagging clippings), you are mining a lot of phosphorus from the soil. Mulch and recycle.
 

More Cowbell

Territorial Marshal
May 2, 2005
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Highland Village, TX
#27
Forgot to mention, if a soil analysis shows phosphorus and/or potassium to be deficient, these nutrients must be added annually until a soil analysis shows them to be sufficient. Whereas nitrogen goes into soil solution rather rapidly, phosphorus and potassium take a long time.
Any time you remove a leaf crop (ie., bagging clippings), you are mining a lot of phosphorus from the soil. Mulch and recycle.
Thanks, I appreciate it. I guess I need to do the soil analysis. I just use regular Scotts Weed & Feed (28-0-3) 2-3 applications during the spring & summer and the winter version (28-2-12) in the fall. So usually 3 total applications. I wouldn't think nitrogen is the problem. Everything is in full sun and I have always used a mulching blade and kept all of the clippings on the lawn.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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Ardmore, Ok.
#28
Thanks, I appreciate it. I guess I need to do the soil analysis. I just use regular Scotts Weed & Feed (28-0-3) 2-3 applications during the spring & summer and the winter version (28-2-12) in the fall. So usually 3 total applications. I wouldn't think nitrogen is the problem. Everything is in full sun and I have always used a mulching blade and kept all of the clippings on the lawn.
You might be nitrogen deficient. Don't know how much fertilizer you are applying, but for the recommended rate of 1 unit (pound) of "actual nitrogen" per 1,000 sq. ft. per month, it would require 18 lbs. (3.6 lbs./month) of a 28% nitrogen fertilizer per 1,000 sq. ft. to provide it over the 5 month growing season. It is recommended that, in Oklahoma, no nitrogen be applied after Sept.1-15, as this late season flush of new, tender growth can make the turf more susceptible to winter kill. The nitrogen encourages the turf to stay in a vegetative mode and may not "harden off" before first freeze.
Additionally, Oklahoma soils are notorious for being phosphorus deficient. If phosphorus is deficient, then the turf cannot utilize all of the applied nitrogen, and your two products are practically devoid of phosphorus.
Best course of action - pull soil samples for analysis (your County OSU Extension Office) and fertilize accordingly.
Second best course of action - follow the management and fertility program outlined in the OSU Extension Fact Sheet that I linked in the post above.
 
Jul 26, 2011
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Morris, Oklahoma
#29
I think I'm going to go with the heartland. Watered mostly in the evening last year. May try and do morning this time. I shall report results.
Read this thread last year but never heard how it turned out and this year I'm in the same boat... I live in west Tulsa right next to TCC and the backyard is very shady, how did the heartland supreme work for you? I put down tall fescue seed but may just buy some sod if it doesn't germinate. Thanks for any help. (FYI, I'm no expert, just learn a few thing from the pops, so Layman's terms if you get scientific, please. haha!)
 

oks10

Territorial Marshal
Sep 9, 2007
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Yukon, OK
#30
My biggest issue is on the sides of my house. They are mostly just bare dirt, the bermuda that was there had no chance... I did use the penningtion all in one shade grass stuff and it actually worked really well, and then I put too much fertilizer down once and burned half of it up. lol. I've been getting O'connors fertilizer and that stuff is amazing. I just did the front yard last year and you can tell that it let the bermuda grow thick enough to choke out the weeds because the backyard is full of them and front barely has any. I'll be fertilizing the back this year too (which will be real fun to keep up with...).
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
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Oct 18, 2006
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Fairfield, CT
#31
I relocated to Houston and I am encountering weeds I have never experienced before. Most of the stuff I have encountered before in OK and North Texas, I have been able to chase off, mainly crabgrass, and the other usual 24D broadleafs.

I have this weird grass popping up with fuzzy "ballz" on it. I don't know if these are burrs or not, but they aren't really what I have experienced as burrs in the past.

Can anyone identify this crap and what will kill it? 24D doesn't seem to do it.

mysteryweed.jpg
 
Feb 6, 2007
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Ardmore, Ok.
#32
I relocated to Houston and I am encountering weeds I have never experienced before. Most of the stuff I have encountered before in OK and North Texas, I have been able to chase off, mainly crabgrass, and the other usual 24D broadleafs.

I have this weird grass popping up with fuzzy "ballz" on it. I don't know if these are burrs or not, but they aren't really what I have experienced as burrs in the past.

Can anyone identify this crap and what will kill it? 24D doesn't seem to do it.

View attachment 47205
Looks like Green Kyllinga.

'Image' (active ingredient imazaquin) or "SedgeHammer' (active ingredient halosulfuron-methyl) will give good control. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS.
 
Aug 11, 2004
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Newkirk, Ok
#33
I relocated to Houston and I am encountering weeds I have never experienced before. Most of the stuff I have encountered before in OK and North Texas, I have been able to chase off, mainly crabgrass, and the other usual 24D broadleafs.

I have this weird grass popping up with fuzzy "ballz" on it. I don't know if these are burrs or not, but they aren't really what I have experienced as burrs in the past.

Can anyone identify this crap and what will kill it? 24D doesn't seem to do it.

View attachment 47205
I think it's sandbur. What you use on it may depend on what kind of grass you have so you should probably do some homework before putting anything on your lawn. Or you can pull it.
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
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Oct 18, 2006
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Fairfield, CT
#34
Looks like Green Kyllinga.

'Image' (active ingredient imazaquin) or "SedgeHammer' (active ingredient halosulfuron-methyl) will give good control. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS.
Bingo. After Google imaging, this is totally it. Thanks for the ID and chemical direction.
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
A/V Subscriber
Oct 18, 2006
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Fairfield, CT
#35
Looks like Green Kyllinga.

'Image' (active ingredient imazaquin) or "SedgeHammer' (active ingredient halosulfuron-methyl) will give good control. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS.
Applied IMAGE just over a week ago and now all green kyllinga is yellowing. Bermuda appears to be unaffected.

Thanks!
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
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Oct 18, 2006
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Fairfield, CT
#36
Two new weeds. May be the same thing. I mistook it for the beginnings of crabgrass and quinclorac (Drive 75) did nothing. I have my suspicions as to what it is, but I want unbiased input. Suggestions as to what it is and how to kill it?

IMG_9911_OP.jpg

IMG_9913_OP.jpg
 
Feb 6, 2007
4,384
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Ardmore, Ok.
#37
Two new weeds. May be the same thing. I mistook it for the beginnings of crabgrass and quinclorac (Drive 75) did nothing. I have my suspicions as to what it is, but I want unbiased input. Suggestions as to what it is and how to kill it?

View attachment 48102
View attachment 48103
I still suspect that it is crabgrass. There are several varieties of crabgrass, and quinchlorac is an old formulation that is marginal for control. Try MSMA. Even if it is not crabgrass, MSMA will take out most of the grassy weeds. Follow label directions for two applications 10-14 days apart. Will make the bermuda sick (some yellowing) but, at label rates, will not kill it.
 
Last edited:
Feb 6, 2007
4,384
4,810
1,743
Ardmore, Ok.
#38
Next year, try a pre-emergent application (probably mid-January in your location) and a second one ~6 weeks later (first of March). That should prevent most of these problems. Some post-emergent spot treatments might be needed, but it should take care of most of the annual grassy and broadleaf weeds. Any number of pre-emergent possibilities on bermuda:
  • Pendulum
  • Surflan
  • Simazine
  • Barricade
  • etc.
 

sc5mu93

WeaselMonkey
A/V Subscriber
Oct 18, 2006
8,481
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Fairfield, CT
#39
Next year, try a pre-emergent application (probably mid-January in your location) and a second one ~6 weeks later (first of March). That should prevent most of these problems. Some post-emergent spot treatments might be needed, but it should take care of most of the annual grassy and broadleaf weeds. Any number of pre-emergent possibilities on bermuda:
  • Pendulum
  • Surflan
  • Simazine
  • Barricade
  • etc.
I've been in this house a year, so I am just now really getting into my pre-emergent schedule. I will have to go check my notes, but I am pretty sure I used pendulum first week in Feb, so I may have been late (and last week in October). Even still, my posts here are by FAR minor compared to what my yard used to be. The bermuda is taking over, and I have some trouble spots that mainly I just can't identify.

The house used to be a rental, and the bermudagrass was the minority of the yard.

As to the recent photos, my suspicion is that the pictured weeds are St Augustine grass before the runners have taken off. One of my neighbors doesn't care, and his yard is a mixture of everything including St Augustine grass. If St Augustine, what can I use to kill it?
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
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Oct 31, 2005
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#40
I've been in this house a year, so I am just now really getting into my pre-emergent schedule. I will have to go check my notes, but I am pretty sure I used pendulum first week in Feb, so I may have been late (and last week in October). Even still, my posts here are by FAR minor compared to what my yard used to be. The bermuda is taking over, and I have some trouble spots that mainly I just can't identify.

The house used to be a rental, and the bermudagrass was the minority of the yard.

As to the recent photos, my suspicion is that the pictured weeds are St Augustine grass before the runners have taken off. One of my neighbors doesn't care, and his yard is a mixture of everything including St Augustine grass. If St Augustine, what can I use to kill it?
You can spot kill anything with round up if it's just a few. Pretty much any herbicide you can get easily and broadcast or spray that will kill one won't kill the other......it may be a pain in the ass but if it's just a few runners pull them or spray them with round up. The bermuda is gonna win that fight and take over in the long run.