KTLA: California Law Would Allow College Athletes to Be Paid

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OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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#1
Personally, I listened to a great two-sided interview about this on NPR this morning. Personally, I think it's a great thing.

Schools should make their money, but if we're talking the likeness of a jersey sale or a video game likeness. It's absurd that the NCAA takes all of that power away from them.

Personally, I think there is too much money in college sports anyway to be keeping up the amateur charade.But if the money is coming in, the athletes - the reason most people watch the game and wear the shirts should be getting a cut.

https://ktla.com/2019/09/09/califor...c7W76X3MoPP8y5eTBycBM07oJg0J6aFuliuF29HYnW4Ns



The California Assembly has passed a bill to let college athletes make money, setting up a confrontation with the NCAA that could jeopardize the athletic futures of programs at USC, UCLA and Stanford.
The bill would let college athletes hire agents and be paid for the use of their name, image or likeness. And it would stop universities and the NCAA from banning athletes who take the money.
The Assembly passed the bill 66-0 on Monday, a few days after the bill got an endorsement from NBA superstar Lebron James, who did not go to college.
Universities oppose the bill, and the NCAA has warned the bill could mean California universities would be ineligible for national championships.
The California Senate must take a final vote on the bill by Friday.
 
Jun 14, 2011
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#3
Serve the state right if all the NCAA member institutions in Cali were declared ineligible for NCAA competition.
I'm on the fence about paying athletes (beyond the scholarships, room & board, food, etc., etc.) as it is a slippry slope where the Texas' and Ohio State's of the world have MASSIVE incomes for paying kids vs. any kind of even medium sized school but how does this "serve the state right"?
 

the truth

Deputy
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Jul 9, 2004
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#4
I'm on the fence about paying athletes (beyond the scholarships, room & board, food, etc., etc.) as it is a slippry slope where the Texas' and Ohio State's of the world have MASSIVE incomes for paying kids vs. any kind of even medium sized school but how does this "serve the state right"?
For jumping into a fray they have no business being in for one, imo.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#5
I'm on the fence about paying athletes (beyond the scholarships, room & board, food, etc., etc.) as it is a slippry slope where the Texas' and Ohio State's of the world have MASSIVE incomes for paying kids vs. any kind of even medium sized school but how does this "serve the state right"?
I'm right there with you.

What you never see truly discussed, beyond "yeah, they should pay them!" is exactly how this would work. Imo, it would affect a small, small number of scholarship athletes, primarily football & men's BB players.

And I share your concerns about the NCAA being able to police this when they already struggled to enforce existing rules.
 

OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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#7
Serve the state right if all the NCAA member institutions in Cali were declared ineligible for NCAA competition.
I believe this will gain traction. And there will be a year or two where schools in California (or other states that sign on) may be declared ineligible for championships; but I also feel it would lead to the influx of the best athletic talent looking to monetize their name recognition.

As a free market guy, I don't see the fairness in limiting the earning power when the schools themselves show no restraint in chasing dollars themselves.

This is coming from a 2000 graduate of the Arthur Andersen School of Accounting. In the same building as the Dynergy Energy trading floor. ;)
 
Oct 30, 2007
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#9
There's a simple solution for all of this. Take the revenue generated specifically off of an individual athlete's likeness, and set it aside in a trust fund. Then disperse the revenue to the athlete upon graduation. Athletes would get the revenue, but they would also preserve their amateur status. The biggest downside to this approach is that blue blood schools like Alabama would be able to generate more revenue for their star athletes. The rich would get richer & the poor would get poorer. Another issue would be gender inequality. Almost all of the revenue would go towards football & MBB stars.
 

OSUMIKE17

Property of The Oklahoman and NewsOk.com
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Apr 11, 2009
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#10
I believe this will gain traction. And there will be a year or two where schools in California (or other states that sign on) may be declared ineligible for championships; but I also feel it would lead to the influx of the best athletic talent looking to monetize their name recognition.

As a free market guy, I don't see the fairness in limiting the earning power when the schools themselves show no restraint in chasing dollars themselves.

This is coming from a 2000 graduate of the Arthur Andersen School of Accounting. In the same building as the Dynergy Energy trading floor. ;)
Here’s the issue. There is no video game likeness or jersey sale when an athlete doesn’t play for a team.

And there’s no way a program is going to sacrifice its season(s) and the money earned from it to have athletes on the team (no matter how talented) that are trying to make money for themselves on the side.

It just isn’t going to happen.
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#11
Athletes already get paid. In addition to a stipend, they get the equivalent of services that would easily cost an average Joe $100K per year.
Tuition
Meals
Books
Medical coverage
Medical services
Physical therapy

Specialized training by top professionals in their field that would be the equivalent of an architecture student going to work with Frank Lloyd Wright, IM Pei and others. Accounting students to be trained by top professionals at Arthur Anderson, etc. Doctors to intern at the Mayo, political science majors to have an office in DC and finance students a seat on the stock market.

Resume service. Yeah, every game, every press clipping is a resume bullet broadcast to millions that would cost the average Joe tens of thousands if not more.

I am tired of the "the schools make money". Yes they do. And then turn right around and spend it on the kids in the form of better coaches, better facilities, better transportation, better exposure. It is not like they are rolling around naked in piles of money (ok, maybe Saban). They invest in the programs that make them appealing to potential athletes and give them everything they need to be successful.....for free.

And, should this farce be implemented, it would be the death of all NCAA sports as football pays the bills. Title IX would collapse. Wrestling, baseball, equestrian, lacrosse, swimming, golf, all of them because without football, they could not afford to operate a program.

As stated above, there would be a distinctly defined class warfare between big donor schools and everyone else.

And I disagree with the premise that people go to see certain players. Yes, every program has a few athletes that may draw some, but by in large, the vast majority of fans go to see their specific team and hope their team is successful. Far more fans hope their team gets to the championship game than hopes Joey Fastlegs gets drafted, never to be heard from again. If the former were true, there would be a complete turnover of fans on 3-4 year intervals as star players come and go. There is not. NCAA fans go to games to see teams, not players.

This is a hackneyed argument and it does not surprise me in the slightest that California is behind the push. There is no greater collection of political morons on this planet than in the Golden State. They invent entire new levels of pandering with every press release, typicallyl without any consideration for impact, applicability or legality. They remind me of the guy who became student council president in the eighth grade because he promised to put Kool-Aid in the drinking fountains. Come to think of it. California legislators, Newsome in particular, have the mentality of eighth-graders.
 

Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
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Jun 24, 2005
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#12
If they feel too exploited they can get a job at a local restaurant, get loans and grants and eat ramen noodles like I did. Nobody is forcing them to play sports.
 
Aug 16, 2012
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#13
If they feel too exploited they can get a job at a local restaurant, get loans and grants and eat ramen noodles like I did. Nobody is forcing them to play sports.
As an architecture student, I had an insane amount of required and expected studio time that no athlete could touch as far as time commitment. Like you, I scrapped by getting kicked out of at least three houses due to missed rent and lived in some pretty sketchy places, three of which have since been torn down. Hate Ramen but at the time, mac and cheese was 10 cents a box. Usually mixed the sauce with water. Worked every semester for anyone who would put up with my schedule including construction for Stan, for Lambert, for Student Services Maintenance and several other smaller outfits as well as worked at Ace Hardware. It cost me at least $100-$200 dollars for materials every month in the architecture program and twice that each semester for drafting/model making gear. All to join an industry that sucks balls as far as salary and stability. I am 56 years old and STILL paying back student loans exactly 30 years later. Have no sympathy for these guys. I made my choices, they make theirs. Nobody forces anyone to do anything.
 

RxCowboy

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#14
So, what about Oregon, Washington, Utah, Colorado, and Arizona where there is no such law? Wouldn't this give the California schools an unfair advantage?

Football and men's basketball can attract endorsements... what about wrestling and baseball? Wouldn't this kill these already hanging on by their fingernails sports?

What about women's sports? They are going to immediately demand equal pay, but not have equal endorsement opportunities, nor do they generate the same revenue.

This is bad. It can't be done. Once again politicians do something that makes them feel good without thinking through the consequences.
 

Jostate

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Jun 24, 2005
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#15
So, what about Oregon, Washington, Utah, Colorado, and Arizona where there is no such law? Wouldn't this give the California schools an unfair advantage?

Football and men's basketball can attract endorsements... what about wrestling and baseball? Wouldn't this kill these already hanging on by their fingernails sports?

What about women's sports? They are going to immediately demand equal pay, but not have equal endorsement opportunities, nor do they generate the same revenue.

This is bad. It can't be done. Once again politicians do something that makes them feel good without thinking through the consequences.
Well meaning, unintended consequences, how often does that happen with legislation?

If 1 state does it all the dominoes will fall. It's a good point that people who push this often forget how many athletes and non revenue sports are supported by the few athletes who are missing out on revenue. Of course those few really only have to be "exploited" for a year or 2, while they develop their skills and attention from scouts, since they can leave early for the pros.
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#17
How about if we just stop exploiting them? Stop using their name or likeness to make money.

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They don't sell jerseys with names. They give away posters with they're faces on them. The only way they use the likeness to make money is on/programs at games, or in ads/promos to get people to come to the games.

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