George Floyd's autopsy report.. no physical evidence suggesting that Mr. Floyd died of asphyxiation

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Jostate

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#61
This is the part where the prosecution will fall apart, they have to prove that chauvin meant to kill floyd, that this wasn't a tragic accident. That chauvin didn’t freeze up and leave his knee in the wrong spot for too long. When you say someone gave him a death sentence, you imply that they intended to kill him, which i think is very difficult to prove.
This reminds me a little bit of the OJ Simpson trial. I was saying from the start that he would not be convicted. Everyone else kept talking about the evidence, but I knew facts had little to do with what was taking place. I bet someone at work he would not be found guilty, then someone else wanted to bet me, then more. I got to be enough that I was starting to worry how I would come up with the money if they did find him guilty.

You guys can discuss the facts of the case if you want, but that will be won or lost in the jury selection, just like the OJ trial. My money is on a conviction of whatever the highest degree is they are asking for. There is way too much emotion involved to get caught up in the facts.
 

TheMonkey

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#65
I can’t believe that we are demonizing, defunding and convicting law enforcement officers based on mob demands before all the facts are available...Sheesh
Well you see, there's this thing called due process.
Even conservatives are saying this should have never happened because it is an example of police brutality. Kneeling nine minutes on a guy’s neck as he cries out, “ I can’t breathe!” and bystanders beg you to get off him. The court of public opinion isn’t beholden to due process. That is why I get frustrated with , “Innocent until proven guilty.” That is a legal principle, which should be adhered to in regards to our justice system. On that matter, we’ll see what the judge and jury decide, which is where due process will mete out justice.

What law enforcement are we convicting before facts come out? I’m not for defunding or demonizing police. I know some admirable folks in the force. This is not an example of one of those.
 

OrangeFan69

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#66
I can’t believe that we are demonizing, defunding and convicting law enforcement officers based on mob demands before all the facts are available...Sheesh
I think police budgets are overfunded often at the mercy of social services, I think expecting police officers to be social workers is asinine. I also believe that when police officers don't live in the jurisdictions the patrol, they develop an Us vs. Them mentality. In addition, their salaries are often become a net negative outflow of of cash.

Communities need law enforcement, but with no threat of competition, the existing authority can become complacent to local oversight.
 

bleedinorange

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#69
If the police exacerbated his condition then they were contributory in his death. So, again I ask, what did he do to deserve a death sentence. It isn't a silly question just because you don't want to answer it.
BS. He created and exacerbated his "death sentence" condition with his fatal (i assume you understand the definition of that word fatal) overdose and subsequent struggles to resist arrest. It's a silly question for reasons already mentioned and your unwillingness to place blame for his condition (dead) on the real cause. Floyd's condition was the result of his socially/illegally irresponsible activities as was his death. Give it up. Facts are funny things, especially when you have none. And you've offered nothing but opinion and a question you yourself can't answer factually.
 

CocoCincinnati

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#71
When obvious is obvious, we can move on to what should be done about it instead of debating if it really happened.
You think it's obvious that Chauvin intended to commit murder and that the three other officers intended to help him commit murder? And that Floyd's health leading up to the incident plays absolutely no part in that determination?
 

TheMonkey

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#72
You think it's obvious that Chauvin intended to commit murder and that the three other officers intended to help him commit murder? And that Floyd's health leading up to the incident plays absolutely no part in that determination?
I never said murder. Obvious excessive force, police brutality. Manslaughter at least.
 

Rack

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#73
Not to excuse this use of excessive force as it was obviously over the top, but Floyd's record likely put the cops on high alert when they were called to arrest him for passing counterfeit bills.

"George Floyd’s Criminal Past
  • George Floyd moved to Minneapolis in 2014 after being released from prison in Houston, Texas following an arrest for aggravated robbery
  • On May 25, 2020, Floyd was arrested for passing a counterfeit $20 bill at a grocery store in Minneapolis
  • He was under the influence of fentanyl and methamphetamine at the time of arrest
  • Floyd has more than a decade-old criminal history at the time of the arrest and went to jail for at least 5 times
  • George Floyd was the ringleader of a violent home invasion
  • He plead guilty to entering a woman’s home, pointing a gun at her stomach and searching the home for drugs and money, according to court records
  • Floyd was sentenced to 10 months in state jail for possession of cocaine in a December 2005 arrest
  • He had previously been sentenced to eight months for the same offense, stemming from an October 2002 arrest
  • Floyd was arrested in 2002 for criminal trespassing and served 30 days in jail
  • He had another stint for a theft in August 1998"
Why anyone uses this guy as an example to look up too is beyond me. Certainly police brutality is a thing, but this guys record surely didn't help the police as they descended on the scene. Sadly Mr. Floyd died in the incident but his previous and current actions certainly contributed to his death. Just as mine would in that same situation with that same wrap sheet. Video is going to be even more of a problem when AI can now make most video appear that someone did something just by having enough footage of them elsewhere and adding the actions creating false narratives for those you want to excite, motivate, and ultimately control. Just as this incident was used and caused death and mayhem far greater than the death of this one man worldwide.

The incident and reaction both are sad evidence of unrest in America. I would hope we all want to get rid of unrest in America both by making police abide by the law and punishing criminality. A balance needs to be struck, one which provides the most safety to all Americans regardless of race or creed.
 

CocoCincinnati

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#74
I never said murder. Obvious excessive force, police brutality. Manslaughter at least.
I agree manslaughter would be more appropriate, but that's not what is being charged in the case. So there is plenty to debate. I don't want to see police brutality and I don't want to see mob justice. It is possible to hold both views simultaneously.
 

Darth Ryno

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#75
When obvious is obvious, we can move on to what should be done about it instead of debating if it really happened.
Seems you'd make a great juror. LOL

Do you work for CNN or on Bernie or Biden's campaign? In charge of their Twitter accounts?

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Kamala Harris

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Jacob Blake should not be fighting for his life right now. As @JoeBiden said, there must be an immediate investigation and the officers involved should be held accountable. Jacob, our nation is praying for you and your entire family.
 
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#76
I never said murder. Obvious excessive force, police brutality. Manslaughter at least.
Then what are you arguing about, just about everyone feels chauvin deserves jailtime, but negligent homocide is about the best you could prove, unless there is some proof out there I am missing. Murder 2 is the current charge and there is ni way they win that case
 
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#77
Then what are you arguing about, just about everyone feels chauvin deserves jailtime, but negligent homocide is about the best you could prove, unless there is some proof out there I am missing. Murder 2 is the current charge and there is ni way they win that case
Very tough to prove Chauvin was responsible beyond on a reasonable doubt based on what we know at this point. If there was trauma to the back of the neck then it would be more clear. But I can put someone on the ground and have my knee hovering or barely touching them and it’s not going to inflict one iota of pain much less be lethal. But the optics of it wouldn’t be good if that person died. But optics shouldn’t matter even though the MSM acts like that’s all that counts. At first I was very hard on Chauvin but as we learn more and more, more doubt is being introduced. I’m a little taken aback by those that say this was clearly police brutality or clearly manslaughter. There’s a lot we still don’t know and when that comes out at trial it could shift things one way or another (or things may stay right where they are). Chauvin deserves his day in court IMO.
 

RxCowboy

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#78
BS. He created and exacerbated his "death sentence" condition with his fatal (i assume you understand the definition of that word fatal) overdose and subsequent struggles to resist arrest. It's a silly question for reasons already mentioned and your unwillingness to place blame for his condition (dead) on the real cause. Floyd's condition was the result of his socially/illegally irresponsible activities as was his death. Give it up. Facts are funny things, especially when you have none. And you've offered nothing but opinion and a question you yourself can't answer factually.
What opinion have I offered? Please, be specific.

"blame for his condition (dead)"

And there you have it.
 

RxCowboy

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#79
This is the part where the prosecution will fall apart, they have to prove that chauvin meant to kill floyd, that this wasn't a tragic accident. That chauvin didn’t freeze up and leave his knee in the wrong spot for too long. When you say someone gave him a death sentence, you imply that they intended to kill him, which i think is very difficult to prove.
"Death sentence" is a counter to "he deserved to die" and not necessarily "he deserved to be killed."
 

Jostate

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#80
I never said murder. Obvious excessive force, police brutality. Manslaughter at least.
I don't think anyone believes the cop acted appropriately, but there's a big gap between excessive force and first degree murder. That's the room for debate I guess.

These things go through a life cycle. First we see a guy injured or die at the hands of the cops, which few are comfortable with, so there is an emotional reaction and the Monday morning quarterbacking. Then there's the inevitable back lash when people get tired of the exaggerated story and we discover the victim wasn't the sweet little baby his mom has been on the news talking about.
Protests turn into a chance for some idiots to use it as an excuse to either get free stuff or an outlet for their unrelated anger to loot and destroy.

When the dust settles we can hope for justice but by then the public has long since made up their mind. I just wouldn't want to be on a high profile jury.