Earthquake?

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Oct 30, 2007
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I live in Cushing and I was driving home when the earthquake hit. I could feel my car shaking and all of the power went out around me. It was a very odd feeling.

We didn't have that much damage personally, a few broken pictures and a new crack in our drywall. Some of our family had broken windows and light fixtures. A block over there was a house that had their entire porch collapse. I haven't seen it yet, but I've heard there is extensive damage to the older buildings downtown. They've had it shut down for hours now.

Hopefully no one got injured. It's definitely an interesting time to live in Oklahoma.
 
Nov 18, 2010
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That's just an old hot spot for earthquakes between Perry and Stillwater trying to act up again. Hopefully, quakes from there will stay under 4.0 as usual, so they won't be too strong in Stillwater. Other old hot spots between Glencoe and Stillwater and from the oil field just to the southeast of Stillwater remain quiet.
Old hotspots? By old, you mean, happened in the last couple years, since fracking became a big thing?
 

StillwaterTownie

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Jun 18, 2010
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Old hotspots? By old, you mean, happened in the last couple years, since fracking became a big thing?
But pay attention to the FACT that the frequency of earthquakes in Oklahoma have been going down hill since last Spring. What a relief it was for the Stillwater area until the Sept. 3rd 5.8 Pawnee earthquake. Sunday's 5.0 Cushing earthquake represents another old hot spot that has come back to life. Expect after shocks from there for the next week or so. It's unfortunate how we're trading less frequent earthquakes for stronger ones. So we have to hope that other old hot spots, now quiet, such as the Langston, Guthrie and Edmond areas don't decide to fire back up stronger than ever before. If it must happen, then I hope it will hold off until the state legislature resumes session in February.

Since the hot spot WSW of Perry seldom settles down, I fear a very huge earthquake will eventually happen there. A major fault line runs through there.

It's interesting how the Praque hot spot has generally remained settled down since 2012.

By the way, fracking has been a big thing since before 2011 when I felt my first earthquake.
 
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StillwaterTownie

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Jun 18, 2010
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Impose Moratorium on Saltwater Disposal in Seismically Active Areas,
Ban Wastewater from Other States, Stillwater Lawmaker Recommends

OKLAHOMA CITY (7 November 2016) – A Payne County legislator called again Monday for a moratorium on all saltwater disposal wells in the multicounty “seismic risk zone” identified by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC).

“Once again I urge the Corporation Commission to impose a moratorium on wastewater injection in disposal wells in Payne, Pawnee, Kay, Noble, Grant, Logan, Oklahoma, and the several other counties that are in the seismically active ‘area of interest’ outlined by the commission,” said Rep. Cory Williams.

The Stillwater Democrat issued his comments in the wake of a magnitude-5.0 earthquake Sunday evening that damaged perhaps four dozen structures in Cushing, site of one of the world’s oil storage hubs where nearby tank farms held 58.5 million barrels of crude oil less than two weeks ago
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Besides the Cushing earthquake, a magnitude-3.7 earthquake was logged Saturday near Pawnee, a 3.1 tremor occurred Sunday afternoon near Perry, and a 2.9 ’quake was reported Monday morning at Nicoma Park. A magnitude-4.3 earthquake was recorded at Luther on Aug. 17, and the state-record magnitude-5.8 temblor occurred at Pawnee on Sept. 3.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently recommended that Oklahoma oil and gas regulators “consider a moratorium” on oilfield waste disposal in those areas of the state that have been rattled by earthquakes, because volume reductions alone haven’t stopped the swarm of earthquakes plaguing the state.

The EPA recommended the OCC consider a moratorium on injection into the Arbuckle Formation “in high seismically active focus areas,” the federal agency wrote Sept. 22 in its annual review of the Corporation Commission’s regulation of wastewater wells.

More than 6.3 billion barrels (265 billion gallons) of oilpatch saltwater have been injected into Oklahoma disposal wells in the last five years, OCC ledgers show.

Even with the price of oil down in the $40/barrel range, nearly a million barrels of oilfield wastewater are being pumped into injection wells in Oklahoma each day, an Oklahoma Oil and Gas Association executive reported during an interim legislative study Oct. 25 at the State Capitol.

“We need to do more than just pray for divine assistance,” said Williams. “The Good Lord has given us His guidance, but the people who run this state apparently aren’t paying attention.”

Numerous scientific studies “have told us that what we’re doing in this state is extremely dangerous,” Williams said. “We are willfully ignoring the evidence. The peer-reviewed research says that high-volume, high-pressure injection is causing these earthquakes.”

During the legislative study at the Capitol last month, Oklahoma State University professor/hydrogeologist Todd Halihan said the evidence that disposal wells are triggering earthquakes in Oklahoma is “clear and convincing,” contrary to what skeptics claim.

Williams also recommended that the Corporation Commission ban the importation of oilfield wastewater from other states. Last year, 2.44 million barrels (102 million gallons) of oilfield wastewater from Texas, Arkansas, Kansas, Colorado and New Mexico were injected into commercial disposal wells in Oklahoma, OCC records reflect.

“We are making Oklahoma a toxic dumping ground and risking our lives and property from induced seismicity,” Williams said.

“And don’t bother telling me that the federal Interstate Commerce Clause prohibits Oklahoma from importing wastewater from other states,” he said. “The government’s own records indicate that wastewater from five other states is being imported into Oklahoma, but nobody is exporting Oklahoma wastewater to any of those other states,” Williams said.

“If we had done this four years ago, as I originally called for, we would not be staring down the barrel of ever-increasing magnitudes of seismicity – two 5.0 or greater earthquakes in 60 days.”
 
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Nov 18, 2010
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By the way, fracking has been a big thing since before 2011 when I felt my first earthquake.
I know you're aware of that there's been a massive increase in fracking in OK in the last few years that directly coincides with these hundreds of earthquakes. I'm assuming you probably work in the industry and I understand you need work for a living. And I understand the world needs energy...but when buildings are starting to FALL DOWN, when communities are being reduced to rubble...we need to stop and take a look at the most likely causes. In this case, that is the explosive underground fracturing and injecting millions of gallons of liquid chemicals into rock formations--that directly coincided with the start of the earthquakes.
To ignore it and just hope that isn't the cause is inviting absolute catastrophe.

Put fracking on hold for a couple years...just give that a try and see if things improve. For science.
 

StillwaterTownie

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Jun 18, 2010
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I know you're aware of that there's been a massive increase in fracking in OK in the last few years that directly coincides with these hundreds of earthquakes. I'm assuming you probably work in the industry and I understand you need work for a living. And I understand the world needs energy...but when buildings are starting to FALL DOWN, when communities are being reduced to rubble...we need to stop and take a look at the most likely causes. In this case, that is the explosive underground fracturing and injecting millions of gallons of liquid chemicals into rock formations--that directly coincided with the start of the earthquakes.
To ignore it and just hope that isn't the cause is inviting absolute catastrophe.

Put fracking on hold for a couple years...just give that a try and see if things improve. For science.
It might be too late to ban fracking and/or injection wells to stop the earthquakes what with all that many millions of water sloshing around underground and leaking into faults. I'm afraid the earthquakes will have to prove they can get strong enough to start killing people in collapsing buildings before the state will do much more to try to stop them, like ban fracking. This is because the policy of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission is to react to the earthquakes as they occur, rather than act to take preventive measures. So what this means is if you want injection wells halted around your town, then first your town is going to have to wake up one morning looking like downtown Cushing or worse.

No, I don't work in the industry.

Meanwhile, this is worrisome: http://www.tulsaworld.com/earthquak...cle_38765045-2646-57f0-9b2b-e1e1ceaa9756.html
 
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