Dumb/Sometimes LOL Political Pictures

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jakeman

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I don't know how you get around Sanger's racism and eugenics in supporting abortion. Fruit of the poisoned tree. It works pretty much how she wanted it to work.

Because, well, you know, they support that, so it's okay, because racism and eugenics were wide spread and not all that controversial during her life time. So, it's okay.

Now, Thomas Jefferson and the other founding fathers that owned slaves, it's past time for those rotten racist bastards to be stricken from the history books.

That's how they get around it.
 

steross

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Adding a period halfway through a sentence isn't fair. It completely changes the thought from reality to what you want them to have said. Reagan, of course, said "Trust, but verify." But, in these days of complaining about Obama trusting the Iranians, this quote makes Obama appear in line with Reagan.

I got curious and actually took the time and read many of the writings of Sanger. Not excerpts or clips attempting to frame her as perfect(D) or evil(R), but the actual writings. While many of her thoughts would be unethical in the modern day, the idea that she was a eugenicist or for the extermination of a race through abortion (which would be a bizarre voluntary extermination) is patently false. She was an advocate of birth control, not abortion. She wanted abortion to remain illegal and felt that birth control would remove the need.



Much of the controversy stems from a 1939 letter in which Sanger outlined her plan to reach out to black leaders — specifically ministers — to help dispel community suspicions about the family planning clinics she was opening in the South.

“We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members,” she wrote. It was, as the Washington Post called it, an “inartfully written” sentence, but one that, in context, describes the sort of preposterous allegations she feared — not her actual mission. The irony is that it has been used to propagate those very allegations. Cruz’s letter to the director of the National Portrait Gallery, for example, quotes only the first half of the sentence.
 
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wrenhal

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Looks like that quote is only a portion of a sentence attributed to her.
http://time.com/4081760/margaret-sanger-history-eugenics/
You might do a little more research into Sanger's personal philosophy rather than depend on a left leaning sanitizing of her words. She was an unapologetic racist.
Her Erasure of "undesirables" included sick, elderly, and mentally challenged individuals as well. She was very much a subscriber to Nazi ideals in that arena.

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wrenhal

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View attachment 64399
Adding a period halfway through a sentence isn't fair. It completely changes the thought from reality to what you want them to have said. Reagan, of course, said "Trust, but verify." But, in these days of complaining about Obama trusting the Iranians, this quote makes Obama appear in line with Reagan.

I got curious and actually took the time and read many of the writings of Sanger. Not excerpts or clips attempting to frame her as perfect(D) or evil(R), but the actual writings. While many of her thoughts would be unethical in the modern day, the idea that she was a eugenicist or for the extermination of a race through abortion (which would be a bizarre voluntary extermination) is patently false. She was an advocate of birth control, not abortion. She wanted abortion to remain illegal and felt that birth control would remove the need.



Much of the controversy stems from a 1939 letter in which Sanger outlined her plan to reach out to black leaders — specifically ministers — to help dispel community suspicions about the family planning clinics she was opening in the South.

“We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members,” she wrote. It was, as the Washington Post called it, an “inartfully written” sentence, but one that, in context, describes the sort of preposterous allegations she feared — not her actual mission. The irony is that it has been used to propagate those very allegations. Cruz’s letter to the director of the National Portrait Gallery, for example, quotes only the first half of the sentence.
I honestly would love to see where she specifically didn't want abortion to be legal because she was a member of the Eugenics Society and it was not just birth control that she ascribed to.

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bleedinorange

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View attachment 64399
Adding a period halfway through a sentence isn't fair. It completely changes the thought from reality to what you want them to have said. Reagan, of course, said "Trust, but verify." But, in these days of complaining about Obama trusting the Iranians, this quote makes Obama appear in line with Reagan.

I got curious and actually took the time and read many of the writings of Sanger. Not excerpts or clips attempting to frame her as perfect(D) or evil(R), but the actual writings. While many of her thoughts would be unethical in the modern day, the idea that she was a eugenicist or for the extermination of a race through abortion (which would be a bizarre voluntary extermination) is patently false. She was an advocate of birth control, not abortion. She wanted abortion to remain illegal and felt that birth control would remove the need.



Much of the controversy stems from a 1939 letter in which Sanger outlined her plan to reach out to black leaders — specifically ministers — to help dispel community suspicions about the family planning clinics she was opening in the South.

“We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members,” she wrote. It was, as the Washington Post called it, an “inartfully written” sentence, but one that, in context, describes the sort of preposterous allegations she feared — not her actual mission. The irony is that it has been used to propagate those very allegations. Cruz’s letter to the director of the National Portrait Gallery, for example, quotes only the first half of the sentence.
Here’s a passage from, “The Need for Birth Control in America,” which appeared in Birth Control: Facts and Responsibilities, ed. Adolf Meyer, M.D., 1925.

“In his last book, Mr. [H. G.] Wells speaks of the meaningless, aimless lives which cram this world of ours, hordes of people who are born, who live, who die, yet who have done absolutely nothing to advance the race one iota. Their lives are hopeless repetitions. All that they have said has been said before; all that they have done has been done better before. Such human weeds clog up the path, drain up the energies and the resources of this little earth. We must clear the way for a better world; we must cultivate our garden.”