Dallas Cowboys permitted to protest Anthem...

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Bowers2

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okstate987

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Bowers2

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Not to mention that blacks have on average 1/10 the net worth of whites, 2 to 3 times the incarceration rates for the same crimes as whites, etc.

A lot of people dont want to see what is plainly there.
People want to stop at the police shooting statistics. Yes, more white people are killed by police. Yes, black people are killed at a higher rate based on their proportion of the population. Yes, black people also disproportionately commit more violent crime. But the conversation has to keep going. What do those stats tell us? Generational poverty, the war on drugs, over-policing, etc. are the systemic things that need attention. It's getting better all the time, but we have a looong way to go.
 
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People want to stop at the police shooting statistics. Yes, more white people are killed by police. Yes, black people are killed at a higher rate based on their proportion of the population. Yes, black people also disproportionately commit more violent crime. But the conversation has to keep going. What do those stats tell us? Generational poverty, the war on drugs, over-policing, etc. are the systemic things that need attention. It's getting better all the time, but we have a looong way to go.
You are getting to the issue. Making this an issue about race doesn’t address this correctly and simply creates more division. The issue is people of lower income levels commit more crime.

Policing is heavier in lower income neighborhoods. And police involved shootings skew much higher in those neighborhoods. The variable is not race, but income.
 

Bowers2

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You are getting to the issue. Making this an issue about race doesn’t address this correctly and simply creates more division. The issue is people of lower income levels commit more crime.

Policing is heavier in lower income neighborhoods. And police involved shootings skew much higher in those neighborhoods. The variable is not race, but income.
Absolutely. But which races does that affect more and why?
 

cowboyinexile

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You are getting to the issue. Making this an issue about race doesn’t address this correctly and simply creates more division. The issue is people of lower income levels commit more crime.

Policing is heavier in lower income neighborhoods. And police involved shootings skew much higher in those neighborhoods. The variable is not race, but income.
But why is the income disparity so great? And what can be done now to correct it?

It's a thing where a lot of people aren't wrong, but the issue is clearly deeper than what the surface shows.
 
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But why is the income disparity so great? And what can be done now to correct it?

It's a thing where a lot of people aren't wrong, but the issue is clearly deeper than what the surface shows.
Stop giving people enough free stuff to keep them right at the poverty line. Teach the value of hard work and family.

The hopeless laziness created by dependence on years of entitlement programs has multiplied each generation.

The fact that people think they are helping by supporting these programs makes it even worse.

Get a job before you marry. Marry before you have children and raise your children together. It's that simple.
 

OrangeFan69

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I have been off the board for almost six months now if I recall correctly. Still drop by about once a week to see what is up and until now, have been successful with resisting temptation to get into a mix with someone.

Cannot stand by on this comment.

I cannot say what you are or this would get deleted, and/or me banned, but your comment shows exactly how little you know about veterans. The Air Force was not even a military branch until 1947, two years AFTER WWII ended. Either he was not in the Air Force or he was not in WWII, either way, it is clear you have no idea what you are talking about and I highly question the overall validity of your reply. If he was a pilot, you would know everything about him down to the number of missions, planes he flew, combat theater, etc. Not even knowing that the Air Force was not a branch in WWII yet you claim he was there? Pathetic.

I was accepted to the US Air Force Academy with the recommendation of an Oklahoma State Representative and a Lt. General that was one of the top people in the old SAC. I chose not to go because I wanted to fly A-10s but could not pass the rigorous inertia testing required to fly ground attack aircraft. My father was in the Air Force for 22 years retiring as a Colonel in SAC. My son spent eight years in the Marines as a Combat Logistics Specialist and has recently rolled over to the Air Force where he is currently at Vandenberg AFB in California for MOS training which when he is complete, will be one of the first five classes of the new Space Force. My nephew was a CCT (look them up if you are so inclined) NCO in the Air Force with three tours to Afghanistan and is now a junior-grade officer who is the lead physical fitness trainer for prospective CCT candidates.

Your comment and disposition make me want to puke.

Maybe I will get banned for this, I do not care. Your disdain for what made this country what it is...is palpable.
ok. I'm glad you got that off your chest.

You were right, I misspoke. Aviation was under the Navy. He trained in Raton, New Mexico, led his class in physical fitness, because he was an All American Tennis player at the time. Had an aptitude for plane engine repair and maintenance, played in the Navy band; but made it clear with his officers he wasn't interested at all in shooting a gun. Not Anti-American but not a killer.

Here's a write-up about him:

https://patch.com/california/redondobeach/jeff-abbey-serves-up-winners

I don't NOT respect the military. I think a lot of people get caught up in their own emotions about the military over personal relationships and I absolutely understand that; I just try to keep my opinion objective when it comes to things like that.

I feel the best ways to honor our soldiers is to ensure they have great medical care and an advantage in occupational/educational opportunities when they return stateside and to only send them in to harm's way for national defense, not over economic concerns.
 

llcoolw

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My guess is they will react the exact same way the NBA players reacted: once they realized that is was their paycheck on the line, suddenly the 'boycott' was over and they went back to playing the next day.

I hated the political grandstanding before BLM, and I hate it now. I don't watch sports to be told America sucks, or America is awesome. I watch them because I enjoyed the competition. Hearing the musings of 20-somethings (most pro-athletes) on social constructs of the modern era isn't my idea of a good time and I would suspect most couldn't pass the basic questions on a citizenship test, let alone give a coherent thesis on any economic/political/judicial topic.

So all-in-all I feel hopeful. Maybe this pushes sports back into the niche of our lives it belongs, not the overarching, all-encompassing, all-consuming force it has become. I didn't watch the game yesterday, and I feel fine today. I would encourage anyone who would listen to skip sports for the rest of the year. Take a break; focus on family or hobbies or some form of self-improvement. I'm going to be spending the weekends playing in the park with my nine month old son and fixing up our backyard for pool parties next summer.

Long story short: stop giving a shit about what entitled millionaires think.
FIFY
I have been off the board for almost six months now if I recall correctly. Still drop by about once a week to see what is up and until now, have been successful with resisting temptation to get into a mix with someone.

Cannot stand by on this comment.

I cannot say what you are or this would get deleted, and/or me banned, but your comment shows exactly how little you know about veterans. The Air Force was not even a military branch until 1947, two years AFTER WWII ended. Either he was not in the Air Force or he was not in WWII, either way, it is clear you have no idea what you are talking about and I highly question the overall validity of your reply. If he was a pilot, you would know everything about him down to the number of missions, planes he flew, combat theater, etc. Not even knowing that the Air Force was not a branch in WWII yet you claim he was there? Pathetic.

I was accepted to the US Air Force Academy with the recommendation of an Oklahoma State Representative and a Lt. General that was one of the top people in the old SAC. I chose not to go because I wanted to fly A-10s but could not pass the rigorous inertia testing required to fly ground attack aircraft. My father was in the Air Force for 22 years retiring as a Colonel in SAC. My son spent eight years in the Marines as a Combat Logistics Specialist and has recently rolled over to the Air Force where he is currently at Vandenberg AFB in California for MOS training which when he is complete, will be one of the first five classes of the new Space Force. My nephew was a CCT (look them up if you are so inclined) NCO in the Air Force with three tours to Afghanistan and is now a junior-grade officer who is the lead physical fitness trainer for prospective CCT candidates.

Your comment and disposition make me want to puke.

Maybe I will get banned for this, I do not care. Your disdain for what made this country what it is...is palpable.
Welcome back. @OrangeFan69 had no intention of disdain.
Sorry but you are a lot late. Dad passed in 1970.

Interesting, about the USAAF pilots. I always heard them say Air Force, no army mention.
I could see where the terminology was intermingled depending on the listener.
Forced may have been the wrong word, required would be better which makes it worse.
Again when require something, be it respect or patriotism, you won’t really have it.
Truer words and all. Applies to all forms of requirement: seminars, re-education classes and even judicial law. When you require something, be it respect, racism, social justice, you won’t really have it.
Absolutely. But which races does that affect more and why?
Which glorifies all their ills the most? Which genre implores words that shouldn’t be said, exaggerates shooting each other and congratulates all those leaving a wake of unfathered children while simultaneously egging on the destruction of the only force strong enough to stop the implosion?
 

wrenhal

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You are confusing “forced” with “teaching”. You state that Williams taught his players the national anthem like that is a bad thing. It is not. Teaching history, respect, honor, and appreciation of others is instructing his players on important life lessons. We should want our young people to have educators willing to take the time to teach with love - especially on items that offer unity.

As a longtime coach myself, I challenge myself to see the big picture and remember it shouldn’t be just about the ”x’s and o’s” everyday in practice. I need to see my players as the young men they are now and do my best to make a lasting lifelong positive impression. What Coach Williams did is worthy of respect. He did the coaching community proud.
Forced may have been the wrong word, required would be better which makes it worse.
Again when require something, be it respect or patriotism, you won’t really have it.
Required, but with teaching and encouragement behind that, can easily become respect. Required with NO explanation or background can just breed indifference.

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Birry

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Over 75% of black children grow up in a single or zero parent household. There's SO much instability. Until that improves, a lot of other efforts will continue to fail.

"Hands up, don't shoot." And other slogans miss the real issue by 1,000 miles.
 

llcoolw

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#73
Over 75% of black children grow up in a single or zero parent household. There's SO much instability. Until that improves, a lot of other efforts will continue to fail.

"Hands up, don't shoot." And other slogans miss the real issue by 1,000 miles.
IMO, all of this and more is based in what you pointed out. It’s not about RACE, it’s about love.

Some of us got too much and some of us got none. What passes for white privilege or just plain old privilege, goes back to love for a child, from their parent.

75% seems higher than numbers I thought I remember but it’s still not shocking me either. Of course these kids, regardless of color, grow up and see how others lived.

It is unfair that I got one drug addicted parent that doesn’t even know I’m alive while you got two parents that both work everyday to provide you with every advantage they can. And their parents too, worked and saved and gave everything to their offspring. How can we be equal if you got breast milk and I got tap water? I got schooled by tv and you went to private school. If you knew all along that every meal was taken care of and that you’ll always have a fall back position, it makes room for less worry and more room for wisdom.

Until the nation comes to a general understanding that none of us is more special, more victimized, more important or more deserving than any other person, we won’t move forward. I hate to say it but HRC was right, when she said it takes a village to raise I child.

When growing up, if you acted out, a total stranger was within their rights to tell you that you’re out of line. Now, they could get shot for not minding their own business. I don’t know if because God is out of the classroom, or if it’s because there’s no capital punishment in school anymore or if because there’s too many lawyers but I have no idea how to right this ship. And we are sailing into an iceberg field. At night.
 
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#74
Over 75% of black children grow up in a single or zero parent household. There's SO much instability. Until that improves, a lot of other efforts will continue to fail.

"Hands up, don't shoot." And other slogans miss the real issue by 1,000 miles.
There’s more factors than one could count and e across all communities across the country. It’s been an orchestrated assault on this country for years upon years.
 
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#75
Over 75% of black children grow up in a single or zero parent household. There's SO much instability. Until that improves, a lot of other efforts will continue to fail.

"Hands up, don't shoot." And other slogans miss the real issue by 1,000 miles.
Do you have a source for your percentage? What was the definition of a single parent household?
 

Birry

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Do you have a source for your percentage? What was the definition of a single parent household?
I heard the stat several years ago, and it may have been qualified by an age range or something. Looks like minors living in alternative situations (absent at least one parent) is somewhere just below 65%.
Here's what I could find with a quick search this morning.

https://ifstudies.org/blog/the-majority-of-us-children-still-live-in-two-parent-families

https://afro.com/census-bureau-higher-percentage-black-children-live-single-mothers/

It's one of the biggest factors at play, here, but nobody mentions it when discussing race relations, crime, socioeconomic disparity, etc...because
1. It's not a problem with an instant solution, and that's all the internet mobs seek these days.
2. It's at least partially rooted in the breaking up of families during slavery, and that practice is still the cause of a lot of problems.

Personally, I believe the problem is first solved through education. And until we level the playing field in public ed especially, we won't see a lot of improvement. The idea that within one school district you can have a super wealthy and super poor school is asinine. That needs to change.
 
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wrenhal

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I remember Candace Owens on a BET panel discussing problems in the black community and she brought up fatherless children and was getting booed. Note, all black panel and all black audience. Then one of the other panelists, a rapper I think, told them not to boo her because he agreed and that also, it's bad when they boo one of their own for just pointing out a problem that exists.

He and Candace disagreed on a lot of things, but I applaud the fact that he saw the problem and also tried to allow an honest discussion without the booing.

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