Dallas Cowboys permitted to protest Anthem...

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.
Jan 14, 2006
1,332
738
1,743
#43
I'm afraid for the future of sports. Ratings for last night's game were down 10% despite an exciting match-up including the champs and the games most exciting player.

Couple this with the huge decrease in ratings for NBA, much less revenue from fans in the stands and pay cuts are coming for all major sports. It will be interesting to see how these players, owners and leagues react when viability is on the line.
 

OP150

John 15:13
Aug 30, 2008
3,930
4,130
1,743
D2L
#44
I'm afraid for the future of sports. Ratings for last night's game were down 10% despite an exciting match-up including the champs and the games most exciting player.

Couple this with the huge decrease in ratings for NBA, much less revenue from fans in the stands and pay cuts are coming for all major sports. It will be interesting to see how these players, owners and leagues react when viability is on the line.
What scares me is that the percentage wasn’t greater.
 
Aug 16, 2012
2,453
1,194
743
57
#45
Yes, my Grandfather served in the air force in WW2.
I have been off the board for almost six months now if I recall correctly. Still drop by about once a week to see what is up and until now, have been successful with resisting temptation to get into a mix with someone.

Cannot stand by on this comment.

I cannot say what you are or this would get deleted, and/or me banned, but your comment shows exactly how little you know about veterans. The Air Force was not even a military branch until 1947, two years AFTER WWII ended. Either he was not in the Air Force or he was not in WWII, either way, it is clear you have no idea what you are talking about and I highly question the overall validity of your reply. If he was a pilot, you would know everything about him down to the number of missions, planes he flew, combat theater, etc. Not even knowing that the Air Force was not a branch in WWII yet you claim he was there? Pathetic.

I was accepted to the US Air Force Academy with the recommendation of an Oklahoma State Representative and a Lt. General that was one of the top people in the old SAC. I chose not to go because I wanted to fly A-10s but could not pass the rigorous inertia testing required to fly ground attack aircraft. My father was in the Air Force for 22 years retiring as a Colonel in SAC. My son spent eight years in the Marines as a Combat Logistics Specialist and has recently rolled over to the Air Force where he is currently at Vandenberg AFB in California for MOS training which when he is complete, will be one of the first five classes of the new Space Force. My nephew was a CCT (look them up if you are so inclined) NCO in the Air Force with three tours to Afghanistan and is now a junior-grade officer who is the lead physical fitness trainer for prospective CCT candidates.

Your comment and disposition make me want to puke.

Maybe I will get banned for this, I do not care. Your disdain for what made this country what it is...is palpable.
 

jobob85

Alcoholistic Sage
A/V Subscriber
Mar 11, 2009
22,998
27,330
1,743
#46
I have been off the board for almost six months now if I recall correctly. Still drop by about once a week to see what is up and until now, have been successful with resisting temptation to get into a mix with someone.

Cannot stand by on this comment.

I cannot say what you are or this would get deleted, and/or me banned, but your comment shows exactly how little you know about veterans. The Air Force was not even a military branch until 1947, two years AFTER WWII ended. Either he was not in the Air Force or he was not in WWII, either way, it is clear you have no idea what you are talking about and I highly question the overall validity of your reply. If he was a pilot, you would know everything about him down to the number of missions, planes he flew, combat theater, etc. Not even knowing that the Air Force was not a branch in WWII yet you claim he was there? Pathetic.

I was accepted to the US Air Force Academy with the recommendation of an Oklahoma State Representative and a Lt. General that was one of the top people in the old SAC. I chose not to go because I wanted to fly A-10s but could not pass the rigorous inertia testing required to fly ground attack aircraft. My father was in the Air Force for 22 years retiring as a Colonel in SAC. My son spent eight years in the Marines as a Combat Logistics Specialist and has recently rolled over to the Air Force where he is currently at Vandenberg AFB in California for MOS training which when he is complete, will be one of the first five classes of the new Space Force. My nephew was a CCT (look them up if you are so inclined) NCO in the Air Force with three tours to Afghanistan and is now a junior-grade officer who is the lead physical fitness trainer for prospective CCT candidates.

Your comment and disposition make me want to puke.

Maybe I will get banned for this, I do not care. Your disdain for what made this country what it is...is palpable.
Did you know anyone who flew for the USAAF in WWII? My dad was a B17 pilot in 1944-45 and always said he was in the Air Force.
 
Aug 16, 2012
2,453
1,194
743
57
#47
Did you know anyone who flew for the USAAF in WWII? My dad was a B17 pilot in 1944-45 and always said he was in the Air Force.
USAAF is the Army, not the Air Force, there is a distinct difference as the USAAF was part and parcel part of the Army. Yes, I have known exactly eight that I have actually sat down with, had lengthy conversations and left feeling I know them. Have spoken with probably 3-4 dozen more that I have met but the conversations were much more casual. They all said they flew as part of the Army, Army Air Force or Army Air Corps. I have never heard of a WWII pilot say they were in the Air Force. You flew for the Army, Navy or Marines.

None more so than a gentleman named Warren Flickinger. Even though he was retired, his name was on the door at the first architecture firm I worked at in Denver in 1990. He still had an office and came in every day. He piloted B-26 Marauders in the Mediterranean and Europe. In fact, he was deaf in his left ear because of his service. According to him, it would get so hot in the cockpit, they had no choice but to open the little side window during flight. Since the prop was less than two feet from the fuselage, right outside the cockpit windows, the concussion eventually took his hearing. Anyway, we probably spoke daily about his service and he would bring in memorabilia and hundreds of photos he took himself during the war to show me.

As a B-17 pilot, I would love to buy your dad a beer and chat him up. Next time you see him, tell him a random guy on OP appreciates his sacrifice and service to our country, and I am sorry that there are some who do not see what they did for us.
 

jobob85

Alcoholistic Sage
A/V Subscriber
Mar 11, 2009
22,998
27,330
1,743
#48
USAAF is the Army, not the Air Force, there is a distinct difference as the USAAF was part and parcel part of the Army. Yes, I have known exactly eight that I have actually sat down with, had lengthy conversations and left feeling I know them. Have spoken with probably 3-4 dozen more that I have met but the conversations were much more casual. They all said they flew as part of the Army, Army Air Force or Army Air Corps. I have never heard of a WWII pilot say they were in the Air Force. You flew for the Army, Navy or Marines.

None more so than a gentleman named Warren Flickinger. Even though he was retired, his name was on the door at the first architecture firm I worked at in Denver in 1990. He still had an office and came in every day. He piloted B-26 Marauders in the Mediterranean and Europe. In fact, he was deaf in his left ear because of his service. According to him, it would get so hot in the cockpit, they had no choice but to open the little side window during flight. Since the prop was less than two feet from the fuselage, right outside the cockpit windows, the concussion eventually took his hearing. Anyway, we probably spoke daily about his service and he would bring in memorabilia and hundreds of photos he took himself during the war to show me.

As a B-17 pilot, I would love to buy your dad a beer and chat him up. Next time you see him, tell him a random guy on OP appreciates his sacrifice and service to our country, and I am sorry that there are some who do not see what they did for us.
Sorry but you are a lot late. Dad passed in 1970.

Interesting, about the USAAF pilots. I always heard them say Air Force, no army mention.
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,221
4,118
743
#50
Buzz Williams teaches his team what it means to stand for the national anthem.
This was in 2015-2016.

https://youtu.be/4Qz58jMhDDA



Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Jul 23, 2018
34
20
58
105
USA
#54
Protesting injustice out of citizens is a patriotic act.
What injustice? Looks to me like Buzz is leading and educating. He is not requiring patriotism, which comes from the heart and the mind. He is explaining why we show reverence to the flag and that his players will show the proper decorum while wearing the uniform. These players are constantly bombarded by the corrupt media/entertainment/leftist culture, and this is likely one of the few moments they'll have the opportunity to learn something different.
 
Mar 11, 2006
3,079
1,945
1,743
#55
Mandatory patriotism is not patriotism.
That is what you got from that video?

What I took away from that video was a coach that was going beyond coaching basketball. A coach taking the time to teach about honor, respect, unity, and appreciation. A coach caring for his players and providing depth to understanding the commitment some citizens made so that they could play basketball. A coach offering life lessons and showing that heroes are just like them and come in all sizes, races, and genders.

RESPECT!
 

snuffy

Calf fries are the original sack lunch.
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Feb 28, 2007
35,332
30,227
1,743
Oklahoma
#56
That is what you got from that video?

What I took away from that video was a coach that was going beyond coaching basketball. A coach taking the time to teach about honor, respect, unity, and appreciation. A coach caring for his players and providing depth to understanding the commitment some citizens made so that they could play basketball. A coach offering life lessons and showing that heroes are just like them and come in all sizes, races, and genders.

RESPECT!
Before the 2014-15 season, Williams’s first in Blacksburg, he printed out lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner” and read them aloud with his team until every player could recite them.

Forced respect is no more respect than forced patriotism is patriotism.
The most patriotic and respectful things citizen can do is point the flaws and injustice in their country so they can be addressed. Like the guy in Boston did a long time ago.
 
Mar 11, 2006
3,079
1,945
1,743
#57
Before the 2014-15 season, Williams’s first in Blacksburg, he printed out lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner” and read them aloud with his team until every player could recite them.

Forced respect is no more respect than forced patriotism is patriotism.
The most patriotic and respectful things citizen can do is point the flaws and injustice in their country so they can be addressed. Like the guy in Boston did a long time ago.
You are confusing “forced” with “teaching”. You state that Williams taught his players the national anthem like that is a bad thing. It is not. Teaching history, respect, honor, and appreciation of others is instructing his players on important life lessons. We should want our young people to have educators willing to take the time to teach with love - especially on items that offer unity.

As a longtime coach myself, I challenge myself to see the big picture and remember it shouldn’t be just about the ”x’s and o’s” everyday in practice. I need to see my players as the young men they are now and do my best to make a lasting lifelong positive impression. What Coach Williams did is worthy of respect. He did the coaching community proud.
 

snuffy

Calf fries are the original sack lunch.
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Feb 28, 2007
35,332
30,227
1,743
Oklahoma
#58
You are confusing “forced” with “teaching”. You state that Williams taught his players the national anthem like that is a bad thing. It is not. Teaching history, respect, honor, and appreciation of others is instructing his players on important life lessons. We should want our young people to have educators willing to take the time to teach with love - especially on items that offer unity.

As a longtime coach myself, I challenge myself to see the big picture and remember it shouldn’t be just about the ”x’s and o’s” everyday in practice. I need to see my players as the young men they are now and do my best to make a lasting lifelong positive impression. What Coach Williams did is worthy of respect. He did the coaching community proud.
Forced may have been the wrong word, required would be better which makes it worse.
Again when require something, be it respect or patriotism, you won’t really have it.
 

OP150

John 15:13
Aug 30, 2008
3,930
4,130
1,743
D2L
#59
Forced respect is no more respect than forced patriotism is patriotism.
The most patriotic and respectful things citizen can do is point the flaws and injustice in their country so they can be addressed. Like the guy in Boston did a long time ago.
But what injustice??? No one can point to specific injustices or even a legitimate area of “systematic racism”. While an extremely simplified example, it’s no different than saying the earth is flat. Just cause it’s repeated over and over and over by those who refuse to look at data and facts doesn’t make it true.

The data says I’m more than 18 times more likely to be shot and killed by a black suspect than he is to be killed by police. That same citizen cannot say that when you look at his odds of being killed by another black male. So maybe we aren’t putting the focus on the correct “injustice”.

We’ve had black citizens in every level of government and corporate structure. Not to mention the athletes who make unrealistic salaries playing games for the masses.

That is not a sign of systematic racism. That’s a sign that welfare has simply conditioned people to sit around instead of working hard to reach their goals. Proof: “working hard” is now considered racist so it’s a no no to even bring up as the idea is a threat to the agenda.
 

Bowers2

Stackin' Joe's Cups
A/V Subscriber
Jul 31, 2006
8,351
5,901
1,743
Edmond
#60