Covid-19

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wrenhal

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https://twitter.com/NPR/status/1291090213306081281


So lets say i had 3 weeks vacation to burn in NY. How will they know if I had arrived 14 days ago unless they keep a record of when I landed or got there in my car? Won't this be hard for the city officials to prove that I didn't already quarantine?
And what if you are just going through the city to get to say.. Connecticut? Or going the other way to New Jersey?

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wrenhal

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Who had Major Hurricane Season on their 2020 Bingo Card?

https://twitter.com/USATODAY/status/1291098147029168136

Last time I saw a prediction like that it turned out to be a dud. They were blaming global war... I mean climate change..

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wrenhal

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After having done fully remote and everywhere in between i've found, for me anyways, that 2-3 days in office is best. You still feel connected to your coworkers, bosses etc but you have the freedom to work remote to avoid commutes, dress casually etc.
There's a guy in our OKC office that lives in Stroud, and started from home (back in 2014) 4 days a week and coming to the office once or as needed. Works really well for him, and I'm going to seek a similar setup in the next year. Probably the least efficient thing for the company, though, since I'm taking up floor/desk space that they're renting even though I'm not present most of the time.

What I'm hoping for is that it just *allows* certain people to work from home, but doesn't encourage it. Say you have a lady that gets pregnant and wants to work from home until the child is in school or even just wants to stay home for the first two years or something. It could allow that to work a lot better now that we've beta tested this on a massive scale and found out that it can work in a lot of cases.

My prediction is that it doesn't have massive immediate implications, but it removes barriers to working from home for certain positions or employees, and may even be used on temporary basis depending on the situation.
One thing that can be done is a cooperative space situation. Say you have 10 work from home people that don't work together normally. You can have 2 dedicated "remote" desks and there can be a schedule to determine who comes in on which day. That way everyone can have a day in the office but you don't need 10 desks.

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May 31, 2007
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It looks like it was a false positive.

We're 7 months or so into this and testing procedures are still suspect. That's really awesome.
Couldn’t the 2nd test be a false negative? Does anyone know traditionally with these or other types of tests which side the errors are likely to come from? I’m pretty sure that my doc told me for flu you see more false negatives than false positives. But your main point stands that these tests are not that reliable.
 

cowboyinexile

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Couldn’t the 2nd test be a false negative? Does anyone know traditionally with these or other types of tests which side the errors are likely to come from? I’m pretty sure that my doc told me for flu you see more false negatives than false positives. But your main point stands that these tests are not that reliable.
First test was antigen and 2nd was PCR. The 2nd test is more reliable.

Personally I think false negatives are worse. You get a false positive but are asymptomatic that sucks for your false sense of security about getting it but after you quarantine you aren't hurting anyone. You get a false negative and are relived because you think you have a common cold but being out in public afterwards you could accidentally infect others.

I guess the important thing is to continue to take precautions no matter what. Wear a mask, social distance, and wash your hands.
 
May 31, 2007
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First test was antigen and 2nd was PCR. The 2nd test is more reliable.

Personally I think false negatives are worse. You get a false positive but are asymptomatic that sucks for your false sense of security about getting it but after you quarantine you aren't hurting anyone. You get a false negative and are relived because you think you have a common cold but being out in public afterwards you could accidentally infect others.

I guess the important thing is to continue to take precautions no matter what. Wear a mask, social distance, and wash your hands.
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks.
 

wrenhal

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Funny how when it comes to mask mandates everyone is ready to dump the in the harbor in the name of personal freedom, but the same all the sudden become big government statists when a new, life saving med comes on the market, which might help get us past the need for masks.

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I'm just not a fan of the Socialism in the Front, Capitalism in the back weird Tax Payer Mullet they got going on with this
Yeah, our healthcare system needs a lot of reform. It is not a capitalistic model anymore and wasn't before Obamacare either.

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RxCowboy

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Tax payers have already paid them TONS of money to test it and help make it. Why do they get to gouge us after we paid ALOT to make it.
Tax payers paid for Research and Development. Tax payers got Research and Development. That's the deal. The Research and Development is over. There was always a possibility that no one would ever benefit from the Research and Development. Now we've found a benefit which means we have to buy the drug. That's the way the system works.

Incidentally, Gideon has taken about $70M in grants and put about $1B in their own money into remdesivir. So, what do you think a fair ROI should be for them? Nothing? Government take it all from them?

But for big government statists it's never enough. They want the land they just moved the tribe onto, so they break the treaty and move the tribe again. Or kill them. And then that next tiny plot of land they find a reason to want it too.

Congrats! You're Andrew Johnson!
 

Rack

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Discussed? Yes.
Determined? We’re about to find out.
Wouldn't we already know? It's not like these kids have been hiding under a rock for six months. Certainly schools and grouping are going to increase, but kids have been all over the place just like Adults. I saw a ton of families traveling in Colorado last week. I mean a ton, far more than normal due to lack of international travel.
 
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Tax payers paid for Research and Development. Tax payers got Research and Development. That's the deal. The Research and Development is over. There was always a possibility that no one would ever benefit from the Research and Development. Now we've found a benefit which means we have to buy the drug. That's the way the system works.

Incidentally, Gideon has taken about $70M in grants and put about $1B in their own money into remdesivir. So, what do you think a fair ROI should be for them? Nothing? Government take it all from them?

But for big government statists it's never enough. They want the land they just moved the tribe onto, so they break the treaty and move the tribe again. Or kill them. And then that next tiny plot of land they find a reason to want it too.

Congrats! You're Andrew Johnson!
I think you and I come at this from different perspectives, but I think there's a lot more that goes into R&D than people realize. In a publicly traded company that makes this a challenge because shareholders don't want you to break just even. I often think people wanting strict price controls don't see the costs associated with the R&D and that pricing isn't just about recouping the costs of this drug, but the other drugs that failed along the way and future drugs that are being developed, since future drug R&D depends on both capital raised in financial markets and the pricing of the drug.

Where I differ is that taking public money for R&D, especially if you're borrowing NIH's clinical trials expertise (think Moderna), that should give you an higher obligation to public good in the US. That obligation could come in the form of price controls or profit sharing programs that allow the government to buy the drug or other something similar.
 
Oct 30, 2007
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From what I've seen, the average cost of bringing a new drug to market is right around $1 billion, and 9 out of every 10 new drugs fail. Companies have to make a great deal of money from successful drugs just to break even.

Gilead's CEO said they would typically charge $12K for a drug like this. So they're sacrificing a lot of revenue by pricing it at $3K. That's great for the general population, but not for their company & shareholders.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Funny how when it comes to mask mandates everyone is ready to dump the in the harbor in the name of personal freedom, but the same all the sudden become big government statists when a new, life saving med comes on the market, which might help get us past the need for masks.

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I'm just not a fan of the Socialism in the Front, Capitalism in the back weird Tax Payer Mullet they got going on with this
Funding research and development is a common good. It isn't socialism. The RNA virus research that the NIH funded has improved treatment outside of the use of remdesivir.

The NIH funded research and development. The NIH got the research and development. Now you want to claim entitlement to benefits that weren't included in the funding. It's like the government breaking yet another treaty and moving the tribe to yet another, smaller plot of land. So Gilead found oil on their reservation and you want the government to move the cavalry in and take it.

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