Covid-19

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Mar 11, 2006
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Thanks for the correction @Deere Poke @gundysburner and @cableok. I hadn't seen that info. I'm just a bit unsettled right know with the thought of my wife (teacher) and kid (kindergarten) going back to school when we can't even keep NBA players under strict quarantine protocol from getting it...
My wife is an elementary school counselor and my sister is a 5th grade teacher. Honestly, I am not worried about them.

Also,I have two daughters at OSU and one of them will still be living in a sorority house with 80 others. I think there is a decent chance my youngest will get the virus. But I am not concerned. She is in good health.

I absolutely understand being extremely cautious with older populations and of those with other conditions. My dad is 73 and has two forms of cancer and a pacemaker. We visited him in early June and we wore masks around him constantly. I know those that are teachers that have compromised immune systems may need to make other decisions than teach - and that is tough. Hopefully with many school districts offering virtual classes as an alternative that those at risk teachers can run those classes.

I know my wife is very anxious and happy to be going back to school next month. She misses working with youngsters.
 
Mar 11, 2006
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Why are you just focusing on deaths? The long term health defects of even those who are asymptomatic are real concerns. It has already been shown that even those that do not exhibit symptoms can have extended lung capacity issues. Furthermore those that do have a more severe case but do not die can still have long term debilitating issues such as blood clots, severe lung damage, strokes, diabetes, mental symptoms (headaches, confusion, seizures), kidney failure and limb amputations.
If you can find data about that please share. I used deaths because # of deaths, # of cases, # of tests, and positivity rate about the easiest to find reliable data.

I don’t know how many cases resulted in kidney failure or limb amputations or diabetes. I just tried searching for that data, but can’t find. So how many and what age groups?
 
May 4, 2011
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I covered this a few days ago. These labs are less than 1% of overall tests and those labs haven't been reporting negatives the entire time. Their percent positive got worse because their outbreak got worse.
 

osupsycho

MAXIMUM EFFORT!!!
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Apr 20, 2005
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If you can find data about that please share. I used deaths because # of deaths, # of cases, # of tests, and positivity rate about the easiest to find reliable data.

I don’t know how many cases resulted in kidney failure or limb amputations or diabetes. I just tried searching for that data, but can’t find. So how many and what age groups?
Obviously there has not been enough time to really study it yet but there are a LOT of indications already. Here are just a few I found quickly. I have seen unsubstantiated stuff showing that for every death from Covid there are 19 more hospitalizations and 18 of those are experiencing one or more long term major issue. Also since Covid is similar to SARS, especially in the way it affects the body, that is where they are saying a large portion could have long term lung function issues as studies have shown half of SARS patients had this issue.
Here are a few of the other stories about long term effects:

https://news.umiamihealth.org/en/what-are-the-long-term-effects-of-covid-19/

https://www.bannerhealth.com/health...term-effects-could-covid19-have-on-your-lungs

https://www.sltrib.com/news/2020/07/12/what-we-know-about-long/

https://www.healthline.com/health-n...complication-that-can-hit-people-in-their-20s
 

Donnyboy

Lettin' the high times carry the low....
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Oct 31, 2005
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One of these things is not like the others, one of these things just doesn't belong. Can you tell which of these things is not like the others by the time I finish my song?
View attachment 83454

Sudden death R0=0
Impact injuries R0=0

COVID-19 is an apple, these are oranges. Kids can avoid sudden death and impact injuries by, you know, not participating in sports. They cannot choose not to sit next to someone who is contagious, asymptomatic, and doesn't know it.

You've been consistently wrong about everything about this from the beginning. STFU donny, you're out of your element.
I know you are enjoying acting like an expert but you aren’t batting a thousand either there doctor. Oh wait you aren’t a doctor. Millions of kids have been in daycare and school since this started all over the world....childcare facilities never shutdown just schools in America...if it was a spreading this virus on any scale we would absolutely know. I’m not saying sports and virus are the same thing......I’m saying 46 kids die playing sports and we never bat an eye....educating our children is more important than sports...oh by the way thousands of kids are playing summer sports now and kids have been going back and fourth from each other’s houses for months....hell there are wrestling camps and tourneys going...I looked and can’t find a single death of a child attributed to with a school or daycare anywhere. (Not saying It hasn’t happened but I didn’t find it and the way the media is sensationalizing every non senior death if it was killing kids at a daycare Cuomo would be crying on CNN nightly) The CDC is ignoring the data from all the countries in all the graphs above with their school recommendations which are impossible for schools to meet and while precautions are being taken elsewhere no where near the restrictions they are suggesting and they came out with them over a month ago long before the current spike in cases (but after their statement on cats) which still isn’t impacting children on any scale.
 
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Nov 18, 2011
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I covered this a few days ago. These labs are less than 1% of overall tests and those labs haven't been reporting negatives the entire time. Their percent positive got worse because their outbreak got worse.
That’s not accurate or what is being reported. Some are showing the 100% but there are also several showing 70, 80, 90% positive rates including some of the larger medical groups in the state. Those groups have confirmed the state’s numbers are not accurate.
 
May 4, 2011
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That’s not accurate or what is being reported. Some are showing the 100% but there are also several showing 70, 80, 90% positive rates including some of the larger medical groups in the state.
You're welcome to go back through the report and correct my math. I actually went through the full report from a couple days ago and did some totals, though I did it quickly and it's entirely possible I missed a few. I do not have the time nor the motivation to do it a second time.

Taking all of the data into consideration, it also seems really hard to argue that Florida's epidemic hasn't gotten significantly worse, which seems to be the larger point.
 

Rack

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Oct 13, 2004
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Kids are going places already. They also don’t spread the disease as much. I don’t have the link, but NBC News on their Sunday show had an excellent graphic about how little youths transmit the virus.
I don’t know about that man. Most of the people from my church that got it have teen kids that likely gave it to them because of youth events.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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Nov 8, 2004
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Wishing I was in Stillwater
I know you are enjoying acting like an expert but you aren’t batting a thousand either there doctor. Oh wait you aren’t a doctor.
More people call me Doctor every day in the hospital than call you Doctor every day wherever you happen to work, so if that's supposed to be an insult, it falls kinda short.
.if it was a spreading this virus on any scale we would absolutely know.
You just can't let go of your wrongness, can you. The cognitive dissonance for donny of the apocalypse is just too strong. Posted by my friend the epidemiologist two days ago:

COVID-19: Monday July 13th
K-12 schools - reopening, what you need to know and what you need to ask.

Globally we hit 13 million cases over the weekend which means globally we added 1 million cases in 4 days. That is 1 day faster than the last million. The US also set a new record on Friday with 71k new cases in a single day.

Let's talk about K-12 schools reopening. (we will do colleges another day this week). There is a lot we could discuss but who wants to read a novel? Instead I am going to focus on just a few key points, but I am happy to answer any questions you may have or provide resources as needed. I too have children so I understand the angst this situation can cause.

Remember, this is all about recognizing risk and how to mitigate it. So I want to focus on practical things you can do to get the information you need and feel informed to make a decision for your family. I also want to say that there are a lot of unknowns here and this is not going to be a one size fits all situation. Prevention plans must be specific to the school system and even to the individual school. The CDC published a guide for schools to know if it was safe to reopen and then guidance for how to do that.

However, it is just guidance, to guide each school through what to consider and ways to address risks. It has to be tailored to each situation and it is not regulation. That is how these things work.

While there is much that is unknown, we do know that children (under 16) seem to be less likely to develop severe COVID-19 than adults. They also seem to be less likely to spread it. How many children exactly have gotten it we can't know because right now many children are considerably less social than they were before the outbreak (i.e. they are staying home) and many states aren't testing children at all unless they end up hospitalized. So we don't have any idea how many children have gotten it. This means current infection rate numbers for children tell us very little.

We know that less children end up hospitalized which means children tend to have less severe cases. We also know that school is an essential service and not attending school has significant negative outcomes for many children. Some things we have seen include: increased mental health issues, increased child abuse, increased molestation, increased hunger, increased achievement gap, loss of learning, decreased access to counseling, decreased access to social programs, healthy meals etc. The reality of this situation is there are negative consequences either way. We are choosing between two bad options. More than likely, schools will open so what can we do to make sure that is done safely?

Information is vital. I have seen reports from other countries that they reopened without issues. This is true. But there have also been countries that have not - Israel and Australia for example. How well this goes depends on how well each school does it. We also need to remember that teachers and staff are a very big part of this equation and their risk is higher than our students. Three teachers in Arizona just got COVID while meeting at the school to teach online summer classes. One of them died. The other two are still ill, weeks later. So prevention and protection measures need to include protecting teachers and staff.
Identifying the risks is key. Arrival and departures are high risk times (including riding the bus to and from), recess, lunch, library time, changing classes, bathroom breaks, gym, choir, music and athletics are also all high risk activities. Extracurricular activities could be as well depending on the activity. Large, crowded classrooms are a risk. Any prevention plan should include plans for reducing the risk associated with these activities.

We also need to remember that MIS-C is a life threatening disease that is a "side effect" of children being exposed to COVID-19.

Most likely your school is going to open. As a parent, teacher, or staff member you need to know the prevention plan at your school. You want to ask questions to assure they have a quality, well developed plan. Some things to ask/know - 1) did they include a public health professional, epidemiologist or infection prevention specialist in the plan development? 2) Do they have a plan for high risk students, teachers and staff? i.e. what about people who can't be there or don't feel safe doing so? Is there an option for them? 3) Do they have a plan for when someone tests positive? Because most likely someone will. 4) what is the plan to reduce each of the risk areas listed above? 5) does their plan involve more than screening and cleaning? Because that is not enough.

Cont....6) Do they have a plan for what to do if teachers become ill in large numbers? 7) Do they have a testing plan they have coordinated with public health officials and testing centers to get real-time information? 8) what is their communication plan with parents? 9) Did they purchase air filters specifically designed to reduce viral spread? 10) what is their plan B should it not be safe to open or stay open? 11) What PPE will they be providing teachers and staff? Will they be providing any PPE to students? Are they requiring its use? What are they doing about non-compliance? Because the best plan in the world is worthless if people don't follow it.

Ask questions. Lots of questions. Then make the decision that is best for you and your family.

FINAL THOUGHTS: You have to make the decisions that are right for you and your family. Be informed and then make those decisions. Do not feel bad for that. Let others make the decisions that are right for them. Right now we need each other. We need to support and uphold each other. We need to ask questions and seek truth, do not feel bad about that. We are starting another week - if models are correct it is going to be a rough one. Support each other, be kind, reach out and offer each other encouragement. Together we can do this.