Covid-19

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
21,520
9,540
1,743
Earth
My question is for @Rack and @Rack alone. I've been binging Money Heist all day so I'm not sure if he responded or not. I should let it go though, I know his answer even if he won't admit it, and honestly I don't have the attention span to troll beyond a few hours. He can talk a good game about wanting to save lives when it's convenient but if it comes down to it he's going to put his personal interests above the greater good. Most everyone here that has questioned how far we are going with this has been reasonable about it and that's a healthy discussion. He's being a dipshit and you know it.

Personally it's about length of time. Would I take a 60 day furlough to save lives, yeah. I'm ok right now so if I have to take a short term financial hit because of this it's something I'm willing to do. If its long term-never getting my job back and starting a new career at Taco Bell, well that's a lot harder to answer. I would be fine but I don't want my kids to see their childhoods turned upside down even more due to this.

To your question if there was a $1K fine for anyone going 10 mph over the speed limit I'd be fine with it. But I don't speed to begin with so it's an easy question for me. I don't find it to be an acceptable risk. I have a 10 minute drive to work and that 30 seconds I might gain driving like I'm in Daytona isn't worth an accident or ticket. If I'm traveling it's as much about the drive as the destination so no reason to rush it. Interstate I'll do maybe 3-5 miles over just because but if I knew I'd risk a ticket like I mentioned I wouldn't.
My Oklahoma State fan friend...Certainly, I would give all I have for just one life if it was up to me...but, thankfully, it's not. We are born into a broken world that requires we pay an ultimate price of our lives due to our selfish brokenness...Our hope, today above all days, is that the one who conquered death in our stead can be trusted with our very lives. This debate about the virus and lives saved or not is about a temporary situation...about our short lives and how we should live them, and if this is the right way to "save lives" or not...Are each or our own deaths the end or not? This, is really the big question here...And, only you can answer that one for yourself. The answer is the difference between living in fear or not... it changes EVERYTHING...not just this debate.

Ultimately, we do all we can for others and attempt to save all the lives we can...and then we debate if it's enough or not enough or the wrong tact or the right one...Bottom line, we all want to save lives some just have a different opinion on when those lives end, how protective we should or should not be, how long this should or shouldn't go on and what qualities of life we want to pass on to those we love.

May our Easter be filled with the mystery of Christ and a once and for all determination of where we place our trust.
 
Last edited:

ksupoke

We don't need no, thot kuntrol
A/V Subscriber
Feb 16, 2011
12,487
16,662
743
dark sarcasm in the classroom
My Oklahoma State fan friend...Certainly, I would give all I have for just one life if it was up to me...but, thankfully, it's not. We are born into a broken world that requires we pay an ultimate price of our lives due to our selfish brokenness...Our hope, today above all days, is that the one who conquered death in our stead can be trusted with our very lives. This debate about the virus and lives saved or not is about a temporary situation...about our short lives and how we should live them, and if this is the right way to "save lives" or not...Are each or our own deaths the end or not? This, is really the big question here...And, only you can answerer that one for yourself. The answer is the difference between living in fear or not... it changes EVERYTHING...not just this debate.

Ultimately, we do all we can for others and attempt to save all the lives we can...and then we debate if it's enough or not enough or the wrong tact or the right one...Bottom line, we all want to save lives some just have a different opinion on when those lives end, how protective we should or should not be, how long this should or shouldn't go on and what qualities of life we want to pass on to those we love.

May our Easter be filled with the mystery of Christ and a once and for all determination of where we place our trust.
God gave you but one thing but everything you have is owed to him, through the blood of Christ he gave you grace and his grace is sufficient.
Everything else is a series of decisions we each make, whether it’s a reply on a message board, taking a job, or some other life event. Every one of those decisions is about following the teachings of Christ or not and we will all fail repeatedly in not following the teachings of Christ but regardless his grace and his promise of everlasting life remains.

To all of you, I wish you not just a blessed Easter but a life of grace.
 
Last edited:

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
6,813
6,032
1,743
OKC
The most forward looking indicator is the daily new cases curve. It started to flatten about a week ago. The U.S. had a high of 34,196 new cases reported on the Apr. 3rd, and we haven't topped that number since. Hopefully we'll start to see the curve drop over the next few weeks. Things could still get worse if other major metropolitan areas start to blow up like NYC, but at least we're starting to see some signs of a light at the end of the tunnel.

View attachment 79483
Wouldn’t the main reason for this be the available testing? The cases were high before, but the states didn’t have the available tests to stay on top of it. Now that there are available tests everywhere, the data shows the cases are not as scary as once feared.
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,027
3,483
1,743
Wouldn’t the main reason for this be the available testing? The cases were high before, but the states didn’t have the available tests to stay on top of it. Now that there are available tests everywhere, the data shows the cases are not as scary as once feared.
I'm not really sure off hand. It was Mar. 24th when Dr. Birx said that we had done more testing over the past 8 days than South Korea had done in the past 8 weeks. So I think our testing levels have been adequate for the past few weeks. You still hear stories of people that were denied the test due to the fact that they don't fall into a high risk category though. So who knows. We should get a better understanding of how many people have had the virus once the antibody tests start coming online.
 
Dec 18, 2019
143
57
28
40
Central Oklahoma
I'm not really sure off hand. It was Mar. 24th when Dr. Birx said that we had done more testing over the past 8 days than South Korea had done in the past 8 weeks. So I think our testing levels have been adequate for the past few weeks. You still hear stories of people that were denied the test due to the fact that they don't fall into a high risk category though. So who knows. We should get a better understanding of how many people have had the virus once the antibody tests start coming online.
If the entire country is tested what would be the true mortality rate? Half, third or less than it is today?
 
Oct 30, 2007
4,027
3,483
1,743
If the entire country is tested what would be the true mortality rate? Half, third or less than it is today?
I've seen estimates that 50-80% of cases go undiagnosed. I wouldn't be surprised if the real percentage is even higher than that. It will be really interesting to see what we find out from the antibody testing. My guess is that the real mortality rate is much lower than what's been documented to date.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
75,484
52,529
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
Wouldn’t the main reason for this be the available testing? The cases were high before, but the states didn’t have the available tests to stay on top of it. Now that there are available tests everywhere, the data shows the cases are not as scary as once feared.
It isn't necessarily that the states didn't have the tests, though that is true, it is that the early tests took 1-2 weeks to get back, so the data lagged badly.
 
Jan 14, 2006
1,108
654
1,743
If the entire country is tested what would be the true mortality rate? Half, third or less than it is today?
That also depends on what we're classifying as a "COVID death". Dr. Birx also stated that anyone who died who tested positive or was suspected as positive is counted. Even if other factors contributed.

I'm not saying this is the wrong way to track it but, other countries may or may not track that way so comparisons are not necessarily equal.
 
Mar 11, 2006
2,369
1,702
1,743
In stories that are hard to explain: The City of Santa Cruz ticketed and fined 7 individuals $1k each for driving to Santa Cruz and violating shelter-in-place rules.
Oddly, according to its local sanctuary city laws, Santa Cruz “does not inquire about immigration status”. However, in this case Santa Cruz police specifically had to inquire about where the ticketed person lived.
Basically, SC police will check the residence of a legal citizen to insure they didn’t drive to Santa Cruz, but not status of an illegal immigrant who are in Santa Cruz.
 
Feb 11, 2007
4,408
1,983
1,743
Oklahoma City
I've seen estimates that 50-80% of cases go undiagnosed. I wouldn't be surprised if the real percentage is even higher than that. It will be really interesting to see what we find out from the antibody testing. My guess is that the real mortality rate is much lower than what's been documented to date.
My suspicion is that this virus is highly communicable and when this is over and we are able to test for antibodies in those who survive and we will find many that many if not most people will have had and have recovered from the infection. The percentage who die will probably be higher than the regular flu but not
by much.
 
Jan 14, 2006
1,108
654
1,743
New cases and deaths are going to be down for the second day in a row.

I'm hoping we see plans for reopening the country this week. (Not saying we'll reopen this week, just that we should see the plans).
 
Sep 29, 2011
1,446
326
713
60
Breckenridge, CO
I've seen estimates that 50-80% of cases go undiagnosed. I wouldn't be surprised if the real percentage is even higher than that. It will be really interesting to see what we find out from the antibody testing. My guess is that the real mortality rate is much lower than what's been documented to date.
My suspicion is that this virus is highly communicable and when this is over and we are able to test for antibodies in those who survive and we will find many that many if not most people will have had and have recovered from the infection. The percentage who die will probably be higher than the regular flu but not
by much.
In the US, there are 558k reported cases with 22k reported deaths. If reported cases represent 20% of symptomatic victims, and symptomatic victims represent 50% of actual victims, the mortality rate is less than 0.5%.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk