Covid-19

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Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
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Nope. Death rate of known cases will increase.


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I would HOPE that with more test being done on more people the death rate would drop not increase. Why do you say it will increase as we test more of the population that is mildly ill or already recovered and unknown? I believe Oklahoma just received the ability to do 15K test? I would think that would lower the death rate as numbers tested increase, death rates, logically, should go down...No? and why not?
 
Mar 11, 2006
2,340
1,693
1,743
Nope. Death rate of known cases will increase.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Of course, the numerator will increase. No one is arguing that. But the known cases will increase. And as many experts have said there may be hundred of thousands that have it that have not been tested.
Death rate below 1% does not only appear plausible, but probable.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
32,680
16,343
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
Fake news.

No plan is expected to be pulled off the shelf and used as-is. Plans are based on a set of facts and assumptions that are required for planning, and when an actual crisis unfolds those facts and assumptions are updated and the plan is adapted to current circumstances. The 2018 PanCAP was updated and reissued for Covid-19 on March 13th. If we waited until we knew all the facts before we began planning the crisis would be over before the plan was developed.
the assumptions are actually written into the plan. I suggest you go read it. I did

This is the plan adopted in 2018 by FEMA

There are other plans by the HHS and CDC which haven't been updated in some time as well. But again all based on Influenza pandemic
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/planning-preparedness/national-strategy-planning.html


https://www.fema.gov/pdf/about/org/ncp/pandemic_influenza.pdf

Pandemic Planning Assumptions The Assumptions section should address the overarching planning assumptions that were used in developing the organization’s Pandemic Influenza Continuity of Operations plan such as those provided in the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Implementation Plan. It should also identify any specific planning assumptions identified by the organization’s State and/or local jurisdiction. A. National Strategy for Influenza Implementation Assumptions (Sample text) • Susceptibility to the pandemic influenza virus will be universal. • Efficient and sustained person-to-person transmission signals an imminent pandemic. • The clinical disease attack rate will likely be 30 percent or higher in the overall population during the pandemic. Illness rates will be highest among school-aged children (about 40 percent) and decline with age. Among working adults, an average of 20 percent will become ill during a community outbreak. Some persons will become infected but not develop clinically significant symptoms. Asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic individuals can transmit infection and develop immunity to subsequent infection. • Of those who become ill with influenza, 50 percent will seek outpatient medical care. With the availability of effective antiviral drugs for treatment, this proportion may be higher in the next pandemic. • The number of hospitalizations and deaths will depend on the virulence of the pandemic virus. Estimates differ about 10-fold between more and less severe scenarios. Two scenarios are presented based on extrapolation of past pandemic experience (Table 1). Planning should include the more severe scenario. Risk groups for severe and fatal infection cannot be predicted with certainty but are likely to include infants, the elderly, pregnant women, and persons with chronic medical conditions. • Rates of absenteeism will depend on the severity of the pandemic. In a severe pandemic, absenteeism attributable to illness, the need to care for ill family members, and fear of infection may reach 40 percent during the peak weeks of a community outbreak, with lower rates of absenteeism during the weeks before and after the peak. Certain public health measures (closing organizations, quarantining household contacts of infected individuals, “snow days”) are likely to increase rates of absenteeism. • The typical incubation period (interval between infection and onset of symptoms) for influenza is approximately two days. • Persons who become ill may shed virus and can transmit infection for up to one day before the onset of symptoms. Viral shedding and the risk of transmission will be greatest during the first two days of illness. Children usually shed the greatest amount of virus and therefore are likely to post the greatest risk for transmission. Pandemic Influenza Continuity Template 5 • On average, infected persons will transmit infection to approximately two other people. • A pandemic outbreak in any given community will last about six to eight weeks for each wave of the pandemic. • Multiple waves (periods during which community outbreaks occur across the country) of illness could occur with each wave lasting two-three months. Historically, the largest waves have occurred in the fall and winter, but the seasonality of a pandemic cannot be predicted with certainty. • The stages of the pandemic should occur sequentially, though, they may overlap or occur so rapidly as to appear to be occurring simultaneously or being skipped.
 

State

Russian Bot
Mar 15, 2007
13,959
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TX
Honestly didn't pay attention to the last column.

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K. You see now that it's sorted by (ranked by) the far-right column, from lowest to highest? The lower the percentage (at the top of the spreadsheet) is better- lower percentage of deaths per cases per 1M pop. 10% of cases in Italy result in deaths. Only .2% of cases in Suadi Arabia. We're at 1.5%.
 
Jul 11, 2007
608
36
1,578
Nope. Death rate of known cases will increase.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I would HOPE that with more test being done on more people the death rate would drop not increase. Why do you say it will increase as we test more of the population that is mildly ill or already recovered and unknown? I believe Oklahoma just received the ability to do 15K test? I would think that would lower the death rate as numbers tested increase, death rates, logically, should go down...No? and why not?
Deaths will run behind the number of reported cases by at least a week. You don’t die the day you get symptoms. Additionally, as healthcare resources are consumed, deaths increase. It’s happened in multiple other countries. Doctors talking about universal DNRs.


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Feb 7, 2007
900
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Denver
I would HOPE that with more test being done on more people the death rate would drop not increase. Why do you say it will increase as we test more of the population that is mildly ill or already recovered and unknown? I believe Oklahoma just received the ability to do 15K test? I would think that would lower the death rate as numbers tested increase, death rates, logically, should go down...No? and why not?
Are getting testing confused with some kind of treatment or cure?

Edit: I get what you are saying now.
 
Last edited:

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
32,680
16,343
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
Fake news.

No plan is expected to be pulled off the shelf and used as-is. Plans are based on a set of facts and assumptions that are required for planning, and when an actual crisis unfolds those facts and assumptions are updated and the plan is adapted to current circumstances. The 2018 PanCAP was updated and reissued for Covid-19 on March 13th. If we waited until we knew all the facts before we began planning the crisis would be over before the plan was developed.
and PanCAP has nothing to do with the US and stands for the Pan Caribbean Partnership against HIV/AIDS
Now they may have pulled their HIV/AIDS pandemic response protocols and updated them to include COVID-19 but not one US agency has done so yet

Her are the member nations
  1. Anguilla
  2. Antigua and Barbuda
    National Strategic Plan for Health – Antigua and Barbuda
  3. Aruba
  4. The Bahamas
    National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan – 2016 – 2021
  5. Barbados
    Policy Document – Barbados
  6. Belize
    Belize National HIV and TB Strategic Plan 2016 – 2020
  7. Bermuda
  8. Bonaire
  9. British Virgin Islands
    National Strategic Plan On HIV/AIDS and Other STIs For The British Virgin Islands 2015– 2019
  10. Cayman Islands
  11. Commonwealth of Dominica
  12. Cuba
  13. Curacao, N.A.
  14. Dominican Republic
  15. Grenada
    Grenada National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan 2012-2016
  16. Guadeloupe
  17. Guyana
    HIVision 2020 – Guyana
  18. Haiti
  19. Jamaica
    Jamaica National Integrated Strategic Plan for Sexual and Reproductive Health and HIV – 2014 – 2019
  20. Montserrat
  21. Saint Lucia
  22. Saint Martin
  23. Sint Eustatius
  24. Sint Maarten
  25. St Vincent and the Grenadines
  26. St. Kitts and Nevis
  27. Suriname
  28. Trinidad and Tobago
    Republic of Trinidad and Tobago National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan 2013 – 2018
  29. Turks and Caicos Islands
 

osupsycho

MAXIMUM EFFORT!!!
A/V Subscriber
Apr 20, 2005
4,939
2,792
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Valhalla
India is worse off than I thought. They did not give the people any chance to get what they needed to survive locked down for 3 weeks. Not sure how they think this will work.

https://www.theatlantic.com/interna...dia-coronavirus-covid19-narendra-modi/608896/

"The restrictions themselves are onerous: Indians should not be leaving their homes, all businesses were ordered to close, and no transport—via plane, train, or bus—would be allowed. The prime minister called for social distancing, urged his compatriots to avoid spreading rumors, and pledged financial support to strengthen the health-care system. Yet the announcement of the lockdown was remarkable not just for its scope, but for its timing. Modi made his speech at 8:00 p.m. on March 24, saying the restrictions would come into force just after midnight and be in place for three weeks. By the time he spoke, shops had closed for the day, catching off guard people who had been repeatedly told not to panic-buy. The next morning, nothing was open in Goa, the state where I live. Elsewhere, such as in Britain, France, and Italy, grocery stores and pharmacies have remained open to provide essential services, but here, they are closed. While most wealthy and middle-class Indians will make it through these three weeks unscathed, able to hunker down, work from home, and access some modicum of entertainment, the country’s poor and its huge number of transient migrant workers (there are no official figures, but the most often cited number is 100 million) will struggle to survive."

In fact it is already failing...

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/27/india/coronavirus-covid-19-india-2703-intl-hnk/index.html

"Thousands of migrant workers are attempting to leave India's major cities after a government lockdown designed to prevent a local epidemic of novel coronavirus left them without jobs or pay.
The potential mass migration may undermine attempts by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's government to prevent the localized spread of the coronavirus, with some workers even attempting to make the journey on foot, due to widespread closures of public transport."
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
21,401
9,511
1,743
Earth
Are getting testing confused with some kind of treatment or cure?
No, just wondering IF more numbers of confirmed cases will, at some point, overwhelm numbers of deaths...Like we would ALL hope it does. A healthcare official I know in Tulsa told me they were originally thinking that they wanted many many more test to calm down the public due to the increase of cases showing that it's less deadly. I figured that would NOT calm down the public as they wouldn't see it...only as an increase in cases and also the 'lag' as mentioned by FHOSU above. I'm just commenting based on that conversation I had two weeks ago.
 

State

Russian Bot
Mar 15, 2007
13,959
8,168
1,743
TX
the assumptions are actually written into the plan. I suggest you go read it. I did

This is the plan adopted in 2018 by FEMA

There are other plans by the HHS and CDC which haven't been updated in some time as well. But again all based on Influenza pandemic
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/pandemic-resources/planning-preparedness/national-strategy-planning.html


https://www.fema.gov/pdf/about/org/ncp/pandemic_influenza.pdf

Pandemic Planning Assumptions The Assumptions section should address the overarching planning assumptions that were used in developing the organization’s Pandemic Influenza Continuity of Operations plan such as those provided in the National Strategy for Pandemic Influenza Implementation Plan. It should also identify any specific planning assumptions identified by the organization’s State and/or local jurisdiction. A. National Strategy for Influenza Implementation Assumptions (Sample text) • Susceptibility to the pandemic influenza virus will be universal. • Efficient and sustained person-to-person transmission signals an imminent pandemic. • The clinical disease attack rate will likely be 30 percent or higher in the overall population during the pandemic. Illness rates will be highest among school-aged children (about 40 percent) and decline with age. Among working adults, an average of 20 percent will become ill during a community outbreak. Some persons will become infected but not develop clinically significant symptoms. Asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic individuals can transmit infection and develop immunity to subsequent infection. • Of those who become ill with influenza, 50 percent will seek outpatient medical care. With the availability of effective antiviral drugs for treatment, this proportion may be higher in the next pandemic. • The number of hospitalizations and deaths will depend on the virulence of the pandemic virus. Estimates differ about 10-fold between more and less severe scenarios. Two scenarios are presented based on extrapolation of past pandemic experience (Table 1). Planning should include the more severe scenario. Risk groups for severe and fatal infection cannot be predicted with certainty but are likely to include infants, the elderly, pregnant women, and persons with chronic medical conditions. • Rates of absenteeism will depend on the severity of the pandemic. In a severe pandemic, absenteeism attributable to illness, the need to care for ill family members, and fear of infection may reach 40 percent during the peak weeks of a community outbreak, with lower rates of absenteeism during the weeks before and after the peak. Certain public health measures (closing organizations, quarantining household contacts of infected individuals, “snow days”) are likely to increase rates of absenteeism. • The typical incubation period (interval between infection and onset of symptoms) for influenza is approximately two days. • Persons who become ill may shed virus and can transmit infection for up to one day before the onset of symptoms. Viral shedding and the risk of transmission will be greatest during the first two days of illness. Children usually shed the greatest amount of virus and therefore are likely to post the greatest risk for transmission. Pandemic Influenza Continuity Template 5 • On average, infected persons will transmit infection to approximately two other people. • A pandemic outbreak in any given community will last about six to eight weeks for each wave of the pandemic. • Multiple waves (periods during which community outbreaks occur across the country) of illness could occur with each wave lasting two-three months. Historically, the largest waves have occurred in the fall and winter, but the seasonality of a pandemic cannot be predicted with certainty. • The stages of the pandemic should occur sequentially, though, they may overlap or occur so rapidly as to appear to be occurring simultaneously or being skipped.
No shit, that's what I said. When planning there's no way to know all the facts, so you use assumptions "presumed to be true" and "essential for planning to continue", until an actual crisis develops and then you update the plan. Congratulations, you're reading a two year old plan and not the current plan that's been updated for Covid-19. I'd link it to you but it's UNCLASSIFIED OFFICIAL USE ONLY II NOT FOR PUBLIC DISTRIBUTION OR RELEASE
 
Nov 26, 2006
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What would you of had Stitt do differently? And if you have some thoughts, what would those actions have done to have any different result?
Thanks for asking!

First, to make sure we are on the same page. Here is my original post about Stitt a few days ago...

Interesting statements. I know he is playing to his base, but it still seems to be a bit of political roulette. If things go south in OK and you see a dramatic increase in new cases and he has to eat his words or people start to question why he didn't issue restrictions to help save lives or health care workers, there could be an easily avoided backlash.

And don't get me wrong, I don't mean he should have issued restrictions. I just mean he could have easily been a little more political and said something like, "at this time, with the information available to us at the state level, I see no need to issue restrictions on local businesses... yadda yadda yadda". However, now he has locked himself in on a very strong stance and could look pretty foolish depending on how this thing plays out.
It kind of answers your question in terms of what I thought at the time Stitt could have done differently to cover himself politically in the case he had to backtrack due to an uptick in deaths and cases.

As for thoughts on measures, I think response time was critically lacking here. I mean, Stitt was even more bullish than Trump on ignoring the seriousness and highly contagious nature of the virus and what it could potentially do to the local health care systems. Especially those in rural communities where supplies are already severely lacking. And again, while numbers at the time in OK didn't seem to be so startling that mandatory restrictions needed to be issued, just as a precaution, working back channels to locate and transport basic medical gear to protect his health care workers in the case of a medical catastrophe would have been something I think a responsible leader would have done. Especially when other ares of the US were already experiencing these issues. Instead Stitt was almost gleefully going against the social distancing advice of experts and posted a picture on instagram of his family eating in a packed restaurant. A picture he later deleted.

This will be hard to tell, but I do think had he come out with a stronger message to cut down on community spread the numbers of new cases and deaths would be lessened. By how much, who is to say. However, as many doctors and experts have tried to explain, I am a believer that the numbers we are seeing today are at least two weeks behind the infection rate. Or in other words, those people that have been exposed in the last week to the virus will not be accounted for until symptoms present themselves and they are tested in April. So if those numbers rise at a rate similar to other Mid-Western/Southern, i.e. Louisiana, I think it is fair for Stitt to should some of that blame, especially if you start to see their care hampered by lack of equipment and healthy personnel.

But the article is really more about Bristow and the efforts of the community leaders around the state. I will post it since there is a paywall.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
32,680
16,343
1,743
Stupid about AGW!!
No, just wondering IF more numbers of cases will overwhelm numbers of deaths at some point...Like we would hope it does. A healthcare official I know in Tulsa told me they were originally thinking that they wanted many many more test to calm down the public due to the increase of cases showing that it's less deadly. I figured that would NOT calm down the public as they wouldn't see it...only an increase in cases and also the 'lag' as mentioned by FHOSU above. I'm just commenting based on that conversation I had two weeks ago.
As more cases have been reported world wide Currently 576,859 the death rate has increased from 3.4% to 4.6% globally.
That is not favorable seeing as it took 67 days to get the first 100K confirmed positive and just 3 days to go from 400K to 500K
 

State

Russian Bot
Mar 15, 2007
13,959
8,168
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TX
and PanCAP has nothing to do with the US and stands for the Pan Caribbean Partnership against HIV/AIDS
Now they may have pulled their HIV/AIDS pandemic response protocols and updated them to include COVID-19 but not one US agency has done so yet

Her are the member nations
  1. Anguilla
  2. Antigua and Barbuda
    National Strategic Plan for Health – Antigua and Barbuda
  3. Aruba
  4. The Bahamas
    National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan – 2016 – 2021
  5. Barbados
    Policy Document – Barbados
  6. Belize
    Belize National HIV and TB Strategic Plan 2016 – 2020
  7. Bermuda
  8. Bonaire
  9. British Virgin Islands
    National Strategic Plan On HIV/AIDS and Other STIs For The British Virgin Islands 2015– 2019
  10. Cayman Islands
  11. Commonwealth of Dominica
  12. Cuba
  13. Curacao, N.A.
  14. Dominican Republic
  15. Grenada
    Grenada National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan 2012-2016
  16. Guadeloupe
  17. Guyana
    HIVision 2020 – Guyana
  18. Haiti
  19. Jamaica
    Jamaica National Integrated Strategic Plan for Sexual and Reproductive Health and HIV – 2014 – 2019
  20. Montserrat
  21. Saint Lucia
  22. Saint Martin
  23. Sint Eustatius
  24. Sint Maarten
  25. St Vincent and the Grenadines
  26. St. Kitts and Nevis
  27. Suriname
  28. Trinidad and Tobago
    Republic of Trinidad and Tobago National HIV and AIDS Strategic Plan 2013 – 2018
  29. Turks and Caicos Islands
Oh FFS, take your Google and fork off. PanCAP is short for Pandemic Crisis Action Plan. If you could find the plan you'd see that.
 
Nov 26, 2006
855
198
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For those that wanted to read the Washington Post article about Bristow's attempt to prepare for the virus outbreak, but hit a paywall...

Here is the link FWIW...

https://www.washingtonpost.com/nati...c727f6-6dde-11ea-a3ec-70d7479d83f0_story.html

Small town battled coronavirus on its own, as outbreak spread in a red state
Kathy Reed prepares food for pickup at Bristow Social Services in Bristow, Okla. (Nick Oxford/for The Washington Post)
By
Annie Gowen and
Juliet Eilperin
March 27, 2020 at 6:00 a.m. PDT
BRISTOW, Okla. — Epidemiologist Mark Brandenburg saw the threat months ago: The data coming out of China signaled that this could be "the pandemic we had feared for a long time."
The chief medical officer of a small hospital in this town of 4,200 people, Brandenburg didn't wait for orders from the federal government or direction from the statehouse. By mid-February, he had launched a citizens' response team to prepare the community for the novel coronavirus's arrival. Local leaders organized a phone chain. Teams of teenagers and college students were formed to deliver groceries to seniors.
Long before schools around the country started closing their doors, the Bristow school system readied a program to feed kids if it shut down — a must in a city with a 25 percent poverty rate.

Meanwhile, Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt (R) was resisting health officials' recommendations to close schools and restaurants and was allowing medical centers to continue elective procedures, even as other hospitals reported shortages of masks and protective equipment. Then, on March 14, he attracted national attention for tweeting a photo with his family at a "packed" Oklahoma City restaurant — which he later deleted.
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Along with Bristow, some of the larger communities in the state started going at it alone, hoping that local preparations would blunt the impact on their residents if the virus swarmed Oklahoma. The mayors of Tulsa and Norman each ordered limits on public gatherings and began shuttering businesses nearly two weeks ago, for example.
"There was no guidance on how small towns should prepare well in advance," said Brandenburg, a veteran of the Hurricane Katrina disaster and the Oklahoma City bombing. "And my experience allowed me to know this and get in early and get our town up and running."
Patricia Flood, who has COPD and other health issues, peeks out of her front door in Bristow. (Nick Oxford/for The Washington Post)
Stitt made a dramatic shift Tuesday after his scientific advisers forecast a steep increase in Oklahoma's cases, which have more than doubled in 48 hours to 248. He ordered elective procedures to cease, bars and restaurants to temporarily close in counties with established coronavirus cases, and told elderly and vulnerable Oklahomans to stay home for five weeks.
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Sign up for our Coronavirus Updates newsletter to track the outbreak. All stories linked in the newsletter are free to access.
"We need all Oklahomans to take this really, really seriously," the governor said at a virtual news conference. "If we take no actions at all, the cases will outstrip our capacity and our health-care system."
In a statement Thursday to The Washington Post, Stitt's communications director, Baylee Lakey, said that Oklahoma's exposure to the coronavirus in early March "was slower than what was being seen around the nation. As the environment evolved in Oklahoma and data on covid-19 indicated Oklahoma had its first untraceable case, Governor Stitt took quick action and declared a State of Emergency that followed CDC guidance."
A member of Stitt's cabinet tested positive for covid-19 on Wednesday after he experienced a prolonged fever, the governor's office said.

Across the country, many towns and cities have pursued their own shutdown orders and emergency responses, sometimes out of frustration with the slow response of conservative governors, as the national debate over how to handle the epidemic — more closures vs. reopening the economy — takes an increasingly partisan tinge.
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What counts as an essential business in 10 U.S. cities?
Stitt's turnaround demonstrates the quandary that many loyalists to President Trump and red-state governors will face in the days ahead as the coronavirus spreads through the United States — the sobering messages from health experts on the ground pose a stark contrast to the president's vow to reopen the country and fill all the churches by Easter Sunday.
Some opponents say that Stitt's actions are already too little, too late and that the patchwork approach across the state is not going to stem the spread.
Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt and Tulsa Mayor G.T. Bynum announce March 6 that Tulsa County has its first coronavirus case. A Tulsa man in his 50s who recently traveled to Italy was the first Oklahoma resident to test positive, Stitt said. (Stephen Pingry/AP)
Oklahoma's State Department of Health reported Friday that eight Oklahomans have died of covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. It also has reported 14 cases and one death in Creek County, where Bristow is located.

The department is setting up four satellite testing stations in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Kay and Pittsburg counties.
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"We've got to be more proactive," said Breea Clark, the Democratic mayor of Norman, the state's third-largest city. She was one of the first mayors to issue her own state of emergency and advocates a nationwide shelter-in-place order. "The idea that Oklahomans might be more immune to this than people in other parts of the country . . . it's mind-boggling."
Chris Jordan, an emergency room nurse working at Integris Baptist Medical Center in Oklahoma City, said the state's slow response and the hospital's "complete lack" of personal protective equipment has endangered health-care providers.

"We're being given daily rations, essentially, and being told, 'This is the best we can do at the moment, and please try to be responsible and ration appropriately,' " said Jordan, who posted a photo of their limited supply of face masks on Facebook.
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Coronavirus deniers and hoaxers exist, despite dire warnings
But in this largely rural state, many residents have questioned whether they are as vulnerable as those living in coastal cities such as New York City, Seattle and San Francisco. Stitt received multiple texts and calls from supporters urging him to keep businesses open at a time when two of Oklahoma's biggest industries — oil and aerospace — are sagging because of the virus outbreak.
Hobby Lobby, the Oklahoma City-based arts and crafts retail company, still had many of its stores open for business Wednesday. In a letter to employees last week, its owner David Green wrote, "While we do not know for certain what the future holds, or how long this disruption will last, we can all rest in knowing that God is in control."

Jeanine Bookout, the owner of Bookout's Family Restaurant in Bristow, tried to keep her dining room open before the state's most recent orders, requiring patrons who came in for pulled pork and fried catfish spaced out at booths. She can only scrape by for about a month under these circumstances, she said.
"I'm on the razor's edge as it is," she said, even before business fell 80 percent during the epidemic.
A restaurant in Bristow remains open on Tuesday despite the coronavirus pandemic. (Nick Oxford/for The Washington Post)
She said she favored allowing businesses to stay open in Creek County.
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"I think it's got to be opened up again," she said. "A lot of people are going to go bankrupt and lose everything they have."
Stitt, a businessman who headed a mortgage company before taking office in January 2019, has been criticized by some community leaders for not closing the schools. As officials for Tulsa's public school system were preparing to shut down the week of March 9, Stitt announced they should stay open.

Even when the governor endorsed a temporary school shutdown on a March 16 conference call, he expressed skepticism about the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's guidance at the time that individuals should not gather in groups of 50 or more. Two people described the conversation on the condition of anonymity in order to speak frankly.
By the time of that call, the husband of a teacher at Tulsa's Thomas Edison Preparatory High School had already fallen ill. Supervisors instructed the school's custodians to wear gloves and thoroughly clean surfaces with their usual disinfectant. The teacher's husband died on March 18: The following day, staff supervisors sent the school's custodians home and instructed them to start a 14-day quarantine.
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"A lot of custodians feel like they're the low end, that they're expendable," said a member of the custodial staff, who spoke on the condition of anonymity out of fear of retaliation.

The Tulsa health department has said there is no risk of exposure to the school's students or staff, and none of the custodial staff has gotten tested for covid-19.
In a recent email to the school's families, schools superintendent Deborah Gist wrote, "The reality we have right now is that there is a shortage of the supplies needed to be able to test. So, while you should ask your doctor or call the hotline yourself, I can tell you from personal experience and from the experience of even those who are sick that you are not likely to get tested right now."
Main Street is seen in Bristow on Tuesday. (Nick Oxford/for The Washington Post)
Scarce and delayed tests for ordinary people have plagued the state all month, though it received 10,000 through private companies on Wednesday. State health officials' decision to test the visiting Utah Jazz basketball team and the state Senate's move to get private tests for its members have sparked an outcry.
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The state health department reported Friday that it had completed about 1,500 tests, 322 of which were positive. At the governor's nightly briefing Monday, according to an aide, state scientists warned him the numbers were starting to spike.
NBA players, celebrities go to the front of the line for covid-19 tests
At Tuesday's news conference, Stitt and his staff said they were ramping up testing by working with the state's two biggest universities and private labs.
"I think we are in very good shape as we move forward," said Elizabeth Pollard, the state's deputy secretary of science and innovation who has worked as a medical lab testing executive.
Public health decisions carry added weight in Oklahoma, which ranks at or near the top state in the country for such illnesses as heart disease, cancer and chronic lung disease. It has a large at-risk population of residents with underlying conditions who may be at risk of serious complications if they contract the coronavirus. From 40 to 45 percent of all Oklahomans — about 1.2 million people — are at risk, according to an analysis from the Kaiser Family Foundation.
In Bristow on Tuesday, workers from the local school district packed around 300 brown bag meals to distribute at different points across the community, where 61 percent of school age children are eligible for free and reduced lunch, a key indicator of poverty. Employees loaded brown bags with carrots, ham and cheese sandwiches, cereal and coolers with milk.
One of those who stopped by a local church parking lot to pick up lunches was Carla Fullbright, 43, a dialysis nurse with four children, including Jeremiah, a 7-year-old with a chronic lung condition. A dedicated nurse who considers her work a calling — she sleeps at the clinic before a heavy snowfall — she worked through the AIDS crisis and treated hepatitis C without fear — until covid-19. Now, she's "scared to death" she'll transmit the disease to her son.
Carla Fullbright, a dialysis nurse with four children, sits outside of her home in Bristow. (Nick Oxford/for The Washington Post)
She and her husband, Leonard, a produce manager at a local grocery store, are considered essential employees, so are continuing to work.
"I wish it hadn't happened, I wish it would go back to normal. I think life will never be back to the way it was," Fullbright said. "There may be good things that come from it — like being at home with your family. But I still think a lot of people are not taking it seriously."
At the local food pantry, workers had set up curbside delivery to protect both recipients of groceries and those packing them, according to Toni Godwin, the executive director of Bristow Social Services, and were asking recipients not to get out of their cars.
"Stay in your vehicle," she asked Vicky Jones, 55, of Bristow, a caregiver to her husband Benny, who is suffering from advanced throat cancer.
Godwin asked Benny how he was feeling, then said, "I'll pray for you."
"Thank you," Vicky Jones said. "I'd give y'all a hug …"
"Can't do that," said Godwin, waving her arms in the air. "Air hugs — that's all we can do."
Elsewhere in town Tuesday, volunteers handed out pizzas in some of the low-slung affordable apartments that dot the city.
One recipient, Patricia Flood, 70, who is disabled, said she had been suffering from a low-grade fever and a dry cough for several days, but that her physician said she would not get a test because she hadn't been around anybody who tested positive for covid-19 yet. She begged the volunteers to bring her Lysol and hand sanitizer, which she said were sold out everywhere.
Still, she said she was trying not to worry.
"I have faith," she said. "Right now, we all better have faith."
Eilperin reported from Washington. Julie Tate contributed to this report.
 

Binman4OSU

Legendary Cowboy
Aug 31, 2007
32,680
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Stupid about AGW!!
@State
Seems they are executing the plan as written as they can but the damn virus is moving and infecting so quickly it is hitting triggers of the plan faster than they can implement the measures.

I would hate to have any of those peoples jobs in this event
 
May 21, 2007
526
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Tulsa, OK
At the local food pantry, workers had set up curbside delivery to protect both recipients of groceries and those packing them, according to Toni Godwin, the executive director of Bristow Social Services, and were asking recipients not to get out of their cars.
Guys, I know Toni Godwin and BSS personally and the humongous service she and BSS are to their community.

They have an uphill battle under normal circumstances and these are not normal circumstances.

Any help you can give services like these, in your community, without putting yourself in harms way, you should.
 

Rack

Legendary Cowboy
Oct 13, 2004
21,401
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Earth
As more cases have been reported world wide Currently 576,859 the death rate has increased from 3.4% to 4.6% globally.
That is not favorable seeing as it took 67 days to get the first 100K confirmed positive and just 3 days to go from 400K to 500K
Is it possible that is a function of only testing those with sever symptoms and not testing those who have a mild form or recover?