Coronavirus pandemic non-socio-political discussions

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
Assuming that posting from statnews doesn't count as sociopolitical discussion but gives a primer on what I was saying about #1 in my other post.

https://www.statnews.com/2020/08/25/four-scenarios-on-how-we-might-develop-immunity-to-covid-19/
This is a good explanation. I can't see sterilizing immunity, because we haven't developed it with HCoV or any other respiratory virus that I'm aware of. Or, if we have, it was in the pre-microbial age and we're unaware that we eliminated it from the planet with our immunity. I think functional or waning is the best we can hope for.
 
May 4, 2011
1,990
998
743
Charleston, SC
This is a good explanation. I can't see sterilizing immunity, because we haven't developed it with HCoV or any other respiratory virus that I'm aware of. Or, if we have, it was in the pre-microbial age and we're unaware that we eliminated it from the planet with our immunity. I think functional or waning is the best we can hope for.
That's been my understanding all along and now we have our first case with either functional or waning immunity. If that continues, it gives massive hope that a vaccine doesn't have to super effective for us to be on top of this within a year or so.
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
9,773
4,057
743
1. According to the CDC, COVID information that is shared with the public should be written at an 8th-grade level in order to maximize understanding. However, in an article published in JAMA that assessed COVID information they found most of it was written above the 8th grade level with significant amounts being at the 11th-grade level which is above the average reading level.
For any document I write, I always run the flesch kincaid reading level test through MS Word on it. Again - 8th grade is what I target. And most of the documents I write are technical in nature. Kind of sad that is the target, but it is what it is.

EDIT: i never even bother with even a spell check on orangepower. you illiterate bastards wouldn't even know the difference. Probably should switch to emoji-speak for this board.
Woah.... I was reading at a grade 13 level in 3rd grade. Yes. I read into college at the age of 8.
That aside, I make grammar mistakes all the time. Mainly because computers and phones suck when it comes to writing.

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Oct 16, 2003
14,957
5,478
1,743
Katy, TX
A Supercomputer Analyzed Covid-19 — and an Interesting New Theory Has Emerged

https://elemental.medium.com/a-supe...teresting-new-theory-has-emerged-31cb8eba9d63

The end result, the researchers say, is to release a bradykinin storm — a massive, runaway buildup of bradykinin in the body. According to the bradykinin hypothesis, it’s this storm that is ultimately responsible for many of Covid-19’s deadly effects. Jacobson’s team says in their paper that “the pathology of Covid-19 is likely the result of Bradykinin Storms rather than cytokine storms,” which had been previously identified in Covid-19 patients, but that “the two may be intricately linked.” Other papers had previously identified bradykinin storms as a possible cause of Covid-19’s pathologies.
 

SLVRBK

Johnny 8ball's PR Manager
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Oct 16, 2003
14,957
5,478
1,743
Katy, TX
Could someone explain "bradykinin" and "bradykinin storm" at a third grade reading level?
Does this help?

According to the team’s analysis, when the virus tweaks the RAS, it causes the body’s mechanisms for regulating bradykinin to go haywire. Bradykinin receptors are resensitized, and the body also stops effectively breaking down bradykinin. (ACE normally degrades bradykinin, but when the virus downregulates it, it can’t do this as effectively.)

The end result, the researchers say, is to release a bradykinin storm — a massive, runaway buildup of bradykinin in the body. According to the bradykinin hypothesis, it’s this storm that is ultimately responsible for many of Covid-19’s deadly effects. Jacobson’s team says in their paper that “the pathology of Covid-19 is likely the result of Bradykinin Storms rather than cytokine storms,” which had been previously identified in Covid-19 patients, but that “the two may be intricately linked.” Other papers had previously identified bradykinin storms as a possible cause of Covid-19’s pathologies.

As bradykinin builds up in the body, it dramatically increases vascular permeability. In short, it makes your blood vessels leaky. This aligns with recent clinical data, which increasingly views Covid-19 primarily as a vascular disease, rather than a respiratory one. But Covid-19 still has a massive effect on the lungs. As blood vessels start to leak due to a bradykinin storm, the researchers say, the lungs can fill with fluid. Immune cells also leak out into the lungs, Jacobson’s team found, causing inflammation.
 

osupsycho

MAXIMUM EFFORT!!!
A/V Subscriber
Apr 20, 2005
5,030
2,796
1,743
Valhalla
Huh?
https://twitter.com/qiaocollective/status/1276913868376207360?s=21
Reading the article they say it is just one sample and there is a very good chance that it is either a false positive or laboratory error. But of course China is going to jump on this single oddity for their benefit.
 

TheMonkey

Sheriff
A/V Subscriber
Sep 16, 2004
3,585
1,901
1,743
46
DFW
Reading the article they say it is just one sample and there is a very good chance that it is either a false positive or laboratory error. But of course China is going to jump on this single oddity for their benefit.
Yeah, it sounds like it is way too early to draw any conclusions. No peer review. Could be false positive.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
COVID-19 Update: Tuesday, September 8
Long-haulers, Flu, treatment options, South Korea, and Numbers

1. The number of Long haulers, those experiencing symptoms for more than three months, is growing. According to reports out of the UK, over 300k people are reporting significant systems for months. The UK is calling for clinics dedicated to caring for these patients which include both physical and mental healthcare.

2. Could your flu have been COVID? Scientists who are reviewing flu cases from winter 2019 early 2020 say some of the flu cases may have been COVID. But even if they were, with immunity only lasting 4 months, chances are those people are once again susceptible and no longer immune.

3. Two brothers are working with AI to identify drugs that are currently in use but may be useful in stopping cytokine storms. So far, they have identified 6 potential drugs that may work to help fight COVID including vitamin D. Based on their work, clinical trials are underway to see if any of these actually work. Worth noting that we have already been studying vitamin D so that one is not new.

4. South Korea originally heralded as a country that “got it right” is experiencing its second wave and it is proving much worse than the first. They are facing severe shortages of ICU beds and have vowed to double that number in order to meet the current needs. In slightly related news, India’s numbers are progressing at an alarming rate moving them into 2nd place just behind the US.

5. America’s numbers looked good over the holiday weekend which is encouraging. While we have to remember there are lots of reasons the numbers could have looked better the last few days, (reduced workers over the holiday, reduced capacity at the labs, reduced testing due to the holiday, etc.) they still looked good with Monday’s numbers being the lowest we have seen in months. Hopefully, people continued using precautions over the holiday and this trend will continue.

FINAL THOUGHTS: The long weekend was hopefully a time of rest and recovery. A time of renewal in which you gave yourself a little break from social media, politics, and the news. But even if you did, returning to all of it today can feel overwhelming. There is a lot of bad news right now – certainly more than our fair share and it can easily sap your energy and motivation. I want to encourage you to treat yourself kindly. Listen to your body and mind and reduce your productivity expectations. Of course, there are some things you can’t alter, there are tasks that must be done and people who are counting on you. But there are other things that are self-imposed pressure. Those are the ones you can control. Those are the ones you can roll back. Take a look around today and determine where you can reduce those pressures that you yourself create. Remember that you don’t have to fight every fight and correct every ounce of misinformation, at least not today. Turn down the noise. Order delivery for dinner or have sandwiches. Reduce the pressure and expectations. Then continue to focus of the small little things that are going right. The coffee maker worked this morning, the shower water was hot, and I knew right where my shoes were. My car started; I got the kids off to school without incident…. on and on the list goes. Focus on those things. Focus on the wins, keep reminding yourself that there is good out there. Share the good and let the rest go.


1918 image. Interestingly, in 1918 schools in 3 places in the US remained open because they felt in those areas, school was a safer location than the children's homes. But schools had lots of nurses and public health workers at that time and if a child was found to be ill, one of them would escort the child home, evaluate the home and determine if the child should be left there to recover or taken to a hospital.
 

TheMonkey

Sheriff
A/V Subscriber
Sep 16, 2004
3,585
1,901
1,743
46
DFW
Curious if anyone has seen good information on how people with Lyme Disease are reacting to COVID-19. Our 14 has LD and our personal research and discussion with doctors hasn’t been incredibly fruitful.

It’s hard enough to get clear information on either of these diseases. Combining the two makes it even more obscure.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
COVID-19 Update: Wednesday, September 9th
Cytokine storm, flu shots, AstraZeneca, Sturgis Rally, and Fake projects

1. The cytokine storm may not be the issue. A new study in JAMA measured cytokine response in severe COVID patients compared to cytokine response in other diseases, using the same measure, and found that the cytokine concentrations in COVID patients were actually lower than what we see in other significant diseases. The cytokine storm is real and happens, but when compared to other significant diseases that also have cytokine storms, the concentrations are not elevated enough to explain what is happening. As a reminder, cytokine storms are inflammatory responses to illness or injury. Typically, helpful in repair and recovery. COVID impacts so many body systems that the response is more spread throughout the body, but still not in high enough concentrations to be the primary issue – according to the report. Worth noting that there is ongoing research regarding the Bradykinin storm hypothesis in the video making its way around social media.

2. Experts are encouraging people to get their flu shots in October. The flu and COVID can be impossible to distinguish early in the disease cycle, so as we enter flu season the potential for mistakes and stress on the system between those with flu and COVID patients can cause an undue burden. In addition, it is possible to get both viruses at the same time – having one weakens the immune system leaving you more susceptible to other infections. It takes about 2 weeks for the flu vaccine to take effect in your system (it is not instant). There have been some changes to the flu vaccine this year so make sure you discuss those with your provider. One thing in our favor this year is all the precautions we are taking, handwashing, mask-wearing, distancing, etc. are good for the prevention of the flu too.

3. AstraZeneca has paused their phase 3 clinical trials after a participant became ill. There are very few details currently available regarding the nature of the illness, but AstraZeneca said they were investigating the illness to determine if it were related to the vaccine. Events such as this are fairly common during vaccine development and most people are pleased to see that AstraZeneca has responded appropriately. They are currently the frontrunner in the COVID vaccine race. In related news, vaccine developers around the world have taken a vow to put the science and safety first despite the pressure to rush and any possible political influence. This seems to be an example of them doing so.

4. A new analysis of the Sturgis rally has linked 266,796 cases of COVID to the rally in South Dakota that included roughly 460k. State officials are disputing these numbers.

5. Beware of products claiming to prevent, treat, or cure COVID. According to a recent study, researchers found over 6 million tweets and over 200k Instagram posts of fraudulent products promoting or selling COVID-19 cures, preventions, tests, and treatments.

FINAL THOUGHTS: Yesterday I saw a commercial for a TV show (911) and in the commercial, a seasoned Fireman was giving advice to new firemen. He told them, to survive they needed to do three things: 1) spend their time and energy on things they could actually control/impact and none of it on things they couldn’t. 2) focus on one task at a time – whatever they were working on, focus on that, and don’t worry about what else needed to be done or what was next, and I can’t remember the third one. But it was outstanding advice. It is so easy to get overwhelmed by everything that needs to be done or frustrated by all the things that “aren’t right” but the energy spent on things we cannot change or have no control over is wasted energy. At least right now. This TV fireman had really good advice that we can all heed. Today, don’t give any of your energy to things you have no control over or impact on. Zero. Instead, focus all your energy on things you can actually influence. And work on one task at a time, focusing on it instead of being overwhelmed by the full “to do” list or what is next. Take it one thing at a time. Be stingy with your energy and time. Spend them on things that matter, in places where you can make a difference. Don’t cast your pearls to the swine because your time and energy are precious and should be spent in places that will value them and where you can make a difference. It’s ok to say no. In fact, it is an essential skill.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
Curious if anyone has seen good information on how people with Lyme Disease are reacting to COVID-19. Our 14 has LD and our personal research and discussion with doctors hasn’t been incredibly fruitful.

It’s hard enough to get clear information on either of these diseases. Combining the two makes it even more obscure.
I'll ask my friend.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
COVID-19 Update: Thursday, September 10th
University of TN, AstraZeneca trial, Black Friday, Halloween, and Pregnancy

1. More than 2,000 students at the University of Tennessee are under quarantine or isolation due to possible COVID-19 exposure. You may recall that quarantine is for those who have a known exposure and isolation is for those who have tested positive.

2. AstraZeneca has released additional information about the illness one participant experienced that has led to a pause in their phase 3 trials. A participant from Britain has shown symptoms associated with a rare spinal disorder called transverse myelitis. One of the signs of transverse myelitis is spinal inflammation. They are currently researching the situation to see if that is indeed what the person has and if it is connected to the vaccine. The answer to those questions will determine if they can resume the trial or if it will end.

3. Home Depot is cancelling Black Friday this year. With so many businesses struggling amid the pandemic it is possible others will follow suit.

4. People have begun discussing Halloween and if we can safely have it this year or if it will be cancelled – or at least trick-or-treating. Worth noting that in 1918 they cancelled trick-or-treating in various places around the country.

5. One in 10 pregnant women are testing positive for COVID, most are asymptomatic. A study published in the BMJ indicates pregnant women with COVID are at increased risk for pre-term delivery (about 17% of them). However, prior studies have shown limited to no risk of passing COVID to the baby in-utero although precautions should be taken after delivery. Additionally, so far, research has indicated nursing is a safe option – COVID does not seem to pass through the breast milk.

FINAL THOUGHTS: It has been rainy and chilly here for days. The sun is rising later and setting sooner as summer fades into fall. I find myself yearning for hot apple cider, a warm snuggly blanket, and a long nap. I also find my patience and endurance waning. Not all at once, but a slow erosion as the day passes. It is harder to be strong and tongue controlled, or finger controlled as the case may be with social media. Fatigue sets in, compassion fatigue, pandemic fatigue, kindness fatigue – you name it. Mistakes will be made. Forgive yourself and others. Make amends where you need to. Move on. We have no time to carry around guilt and shame and regret so let those things go, the burdens of the day are more than enough without the burdens of yesterday or tomorrow. Focus on today. Focus on doing better right now, in this moment. Let yesterday go.
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
70,030
40,674
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
Curious if anyone has seen good information on how people with Lyme Disease are reacting to COVID-19. Our 14 has LD and our personal research and discussion with doctors hasn’t been incredibly fruitful.

It’s hard enough to get clear information on either of these diseases. Combining the two makes it even more obscure.
She hadn't heard anything. I've done a pubmed search and haven't turned up anything. I would assume, however, that a history of LD puts your daughter in the high risk category.