Confederate Flag Craziness

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State

Russian Bot
Mar 15, 2007
13,909
8,005
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TX
#1
It is unbelievable to me that a handful of trolls on Twitter are able to force mega-corporations to stop selling or producing an item just because they find it offensive. They're caving to the leftist strategy to stifle any speech that they don't agree with.

I don't own and don't expect to ever own something bearing the confederate flag, but we cannot write it out of our country's history. And like the US flag, it is a symbol whose meaning differs to many.

I agree with this statement in the article below, though sadly this company reversed its position-

"There are many flags that we sell that somebody could find offensive,” he said. “We sell gay-pride flags. We sell Jewish flags. We sell Arab-country flags. When you’re in the business of selling flags and symbols, I think you have a responsibility to offer everything and not make those value judgments because someone might find something objectionable politically.”

http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/retailers-feel-pressure-on-confederate-flag-merchandise/
 

msq2

Banned
Banned
Aug 27, 2009
13,110
6,001
743
#2
It is unbelievable to me that a handful of trolls on Twitter are able to force mega-corporations to stop selling or producing an item just because they find it offensive. They're caving to the leftist strategy to stifle any speech that they don't agree with.

I don't own and don't expect to ever own something bearing the confederate flag, but we cannot write it out of our country's history. And like the US flag, it is a symbol whose meaning differs to many.

I agree with this statement in the article below, though sadly this company reversed its position-

"There are many flags that we sell that somebody could find offensive,” he said. “We sell gay-pride flags. We sell Jewish flags. We sell Arab-country flags. When you’re in the business of selling flags and symbols, I think you have a responsibility to offer everything and not make those value judgments because someone might find something objectionable politically.”

http://www.seattletimes.com/nation-world/retailers-feel-pressure-on-confederate-flag-merchandise/
How many swastika flags do they sell?
 
Jul 15, 2010
2,283
4,657
1,743
Dallas and Istanbul
#7
The Cultural Cleansing of the Southern States Begins
A full-fledged cultural cleansing of the Southern states is underway as lawmakers debate whether to remove Confederate flags and rename schools and parks named after Confederate war heroes.
There are also discussions in Washington, D.C. about removing Confederate-related statues from the U.S. Capitol — including a statue of Jefferson Davis, the former president of the Confederacy.
“It’s something to think about,” Sen. Harry Reid told reporters.
Republicans, meanwhile, are leading the charge in South Carolina and Mississippi to remove the Confederate flag — called a symbol of hate and racism.
Wal-Mart jumped on the band wagon, too – announcing they will remove all Confederate merchandise from its stores. EBay announced they will no longer sell Confederate flags or any other memorabilia.
Has the Department of Homeland Security classified the Sons and Daughters of the Confederacy as right-wing hate groups, yet?

Meanwhile, there are dozens of reports from around the southeast of lawmakers hoping to rename parks and schools and streets that were originally named in honor of Confederates.

*Tennessee lawmakers are demanding that a bust of Nathan Bedford Forrest be removed from the statehouse;

*Baltimore lawmakers want to rename Robert E. Lee Park;

*Dallas lawmakers are considering demands to rename Stonewall Jackson Elementary School;

*St. Louis lawmakers are debating over the future of a confederate statue in a city park;

*Commissioners in Hillsborough, North Carolina are debating whether to remove the words “Confederate Memorial” from a Confederate memorial.

*The Memphis City Council voted in 2013 to rename three parks – Confederate Park, Jefferson Davis Park and Nathan Bedford Forrest Park.

It won’t be too long before they start renaming cities and towns and counties named after Confederates. And I reckon it’s only a matter of time before they bulldoze the Confederate grave yards and war memorials too.
Maybe we can just pretend the Civil War never happened.
I’m assuming Hollywood will cooperate with the South’s cultural cleansing by eradicating any copies of “Gone with the Wind” and “Forrest Gump.” Forrest was named after the aforementioned Nathan Bedford Forrest.
I do wonder, though, about those good ole boys from Hazzard County. What are Bo and Luke Duke are going to do with the General Lee?
http://radio.foxnews.com/toddstarne...-cleansing-of-the-southern-states-begins.html
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
16,069
16,978
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#8
Slavery existed for 100 years under the United States flag. So did an almost genocidal campaign against the Native Americans. You know what else is associated with the confederate flag besides slavery? The Democrats.

So why isn't the donkey or the stars and stripes under fire to be changed? Because people are selectively offended at what they are told to be offended by. Maybe we should stop giving symbols and words so much power over us and instead focus on REAL problems. But focusing on real problems is precisely what this whole confederate flag fluff is purposely designed to avoid.
 

CTeamPoke

Legendary Cowboy
Jun 18, 2008
44,978
47,503
1,743
Dallas, TX
#9
I think that Benjamin Watson, of the New Orleans Saints, says it best...

It's hard to explain how I feel when I see the rebel flag. The emotional bucket overflows with anger, trepidation, sorrow, a perverted pride and apathy. As hard as I try not to make assumptions about whoever is flying the flag or driving around with it mounted on their truck, my mind can not hold back the painful images of the past generations.... and the current one. The nine racially motivated murders of last week, have written a new chapter in the annals of race violence in this country. And at the center of it all, proudly displayed in images of the killer, the rebel flag.
When I moved to South Carolina in 1996, albeit from the southern state of Virginia, I was somewhat taken aback by the frequency of which I saw the flag. It was on vehicles, displayed on homes, and worn on t-shirts. Like grits and sweet tea, the flag was just part of the culture, an enduring symbol of all things southern. This never changed how I felt about it, but it did teach me to give individuals a certain amount of grace and realize that not everyone who embraced the flag embraced prejudice and supremacy alike.

I can remember visiting a teammate's home for the first time my sophomore year. Frank, a white offensive guard on my high school football team, had quickly become my closest friend, welcoming me, the new guy, when others weren’t so quick to do so. As I walked into his room, I froze, staring uncomfortably at the large Rebel flag, hanging above his bed. I remember the lump in my throat as I briefly attempted to convey in the most non-condemning way, what the flag represented to me and many others like me. Because of the lingering heaviness of the moment, I can’t recall much after that but I do remember how valued I felt, when I returned to Frank’s home some time later and the flag was gone! He didn’t have to, but because he cared about our friendship, because he cared about me, he empathetically removed the offensive banner on my behalf and maybe for the first time heard how painful that symbol could be. That day was a turning point in our relationship and today; Frank continues to be one of my best friends.

It should not take the brutal, senseless killings of innocent black Americans in a church by a young white man, to ensure the removal of the confederate battle flag from the State House grounds where it has flown in proud defiance of the civil rights movement since the 1960’s. If the flag wasn’t problematic before this heinous crime it should not be problematic now, and to hastily remove it in response to this slaughter, although a sympathetic (and economic) gesture, does not address the heart of the matter. In my estimation it is indeed the HEART, that is the matter. Displaying the confederate flag is not inherently wrong. This is not NECESSARILY an issue on which we can take a moral stance. It is not a simple right or wrong dilemma. I understand that for some, the confederate battle flag does not evoke sentiments of racism or supremacy; it is simply a tribute to their heritage, ancestors, and homeland. For others, including the killer, it means much more and for others it is a hiding place for passive racism and group "identity." It is without a doubt, however, a litmus test, exposing our willingness to deny our liberty, our freedom, to fly the flag of our choice, for the sake of offending our countrymen whose SHARED HERITAGE is conversely stained with death, injustice, rape, terror and inferiority.

If we remove the Confederate flag from the State Capitol for any reason other than a change in the hearts of South Carolinians, we may as well leave it be. This is not the time for political statements and worrying about national perception. But if we, like my friend Frank, finally listen to the cries and concerns of those we say we care about, soften our hearts, and choose to lay our liberties aside to assuage the pain of our brothers, the only suitable option would be a unanimous decision to remove the flag from the public grounds at the Palmetto State Capitol. The past and it's people, as acclaimed or afflicted as they may be, should always be remembered. But it is difficult to completely "move forward" if painful, divisive icons continue to stand unchallenged.

Sometimes, tragedies have a way of jolting us, laying the truth about us individually and collectively, stark naked for all to see. The outpouring for Charleston has been nothing short of extraordinary and inspiring. Sometimes it takes one person, one neighborhood, one city, and one state to show the unifying love of Christ to the world. As a canyon is carved by the flow of a river long dried up, may the passion of this week cut deep, leaving a permanent change in hearts and souls long after the emotion has gone.
https://www.facebook.com/BenjaminWatsonOfficial/posts/718321871628280
 
Sep 22, 2011
3,873
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#11
No matter what the flag means to you personally, it is a symbol of treason, spite and racism to everyone who is not a white southerner. It has never been a huge issue to me because the people who flew the confederate battle flag were basically labeling themselves to the world as close minded, spiteful fools, and the world they put themselves in was punishment enough. But I agree that the only place the flag should have on government property is in a museum, or in a reenactment.

That being said, getting rid of a symbol does nothing about the real hate and racism that is alive and well, especially in the south.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
16,069
16,978
1,743
Tulsa, OK
#15
No matter what the flag means to you personally, it is a symbol of treason, spite and racism to everyone who is not a white southerner. It has never been a huge issue to me because the people who flew the confederate battle flag were basically labeling themselves to the world as close minded, spiteful fools, and the world they put themselves in was punishment enough. But I agree that the only place the flag should have on government property is in a museum, or in a reenactment..
The irony.