Blacks, Voter ID and the Census

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RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#1
From today's WSJ:
Blacks, Voter ID and the Census
By JASON L. RILEY

Black voter turnout surpassed white turnout for the first time on record in 2012, according to a new federal report.

"About two in three eligible blacks (66.2 percent) voted in the 2012 presidential election, higher than the 64.1 percent of non-Hispanic whites who did so," says the Census Bureau in a press release. "Blacks were the only race or ethnic group to show a significant increase between the 2008 and 2012 elections in the likelihood of voting (from 64.7 percent to 66.2 percent)."

Obviously, Barack Obama has something to do with this, but it's worth noting that the trend predates the Obama presidency. "The 2012 increase in voting among blacks continues what has been a long-term trend: since 1996, turnout rates have risen 13 percentage points to the highest levels of any recent presidential election."

It's also worth noting that black voter turnout has been increasing even while states have been implementing supposedly racist voter ID laws. Everyone from Attorney General Eric Holder to the Congressional Black Caucus to civil rights groups and the left-wing yakkers on MSNBC have been claiming for years that voter ID laws harm black turnout and amount to Jim Crow-era poll taxes and literacy tests. But that's not what the Census data show.

The black voting trend is most pronounced in states like Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee. Black turnout also surpassed white turnout by statistically significant margins in Florida, Georgia, Virginia, the Carolina's and Indiana. The voter ID laws in Tennessee, Georgia and Indiana rank among the strictest in the country, yet the black voter rate in those states was higher than the white rate. If voter ID laws keep blacks from voting, where is the evidence?

The Supreme Court may soon decide the constitutionality of Section 5 of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which requires that (mostly Southern) states with a history of denying blacks the franchise have any changes in voting procedures cleared by a federal court or the Justice Department.

We already knew that states covered by Section 5 tend to have higher black voter registration rates than the states not covered. Now the Census reveals that blacks in those covered states are also voting at higher rates than whites. How much more proof do we need that Section 5, which Congress intended to be a temporary measure, has been a success and is no longer necessary?
 
Dec 29, 2008
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#2
The best case for striking the requirement of DoJ oversight is that rule changes that incurred federal objections went from 5.5% when the Act was started to less than 0.1% today. The Supreme Court also ruled recently that districts should have greater capability for applying for exemption from this section. While I certainly don't believe racism is dead in the south, I do believe any attempt to subvert voting rights of minorities today would meet with swift reprisal.

Also what does this have to do with Bengahzi?
 

ksupoke

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#4
The best case for striking the requirement of DoJ oversight is that rule changes that incurred federal objections went from 5.5% when the Act was started to less than 0.1% today. The Supreme Court also ruled recently that districts should have greater capability for applying for exemption from this section. While I certainly don't believe racism is dead in the south, I do believe any attempt to subvert voting rights of minorities today would meet with swift reprisal.

Also what does this have to do with Bengahzi?
What section is the scotus referencing??
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#8
While I certainly don't believe racism is dead in the south
I can tell you for a fact that racism isn't dead in the North, either. The real question with the voting rights act is, is there still a valid reason for treating some areas of the country differently than other areas of the country?
Also what does this have to do with Bengahzi?
Gay, abortion, weed. There, did we get it out of our system?
 
Dec 29, 2008
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#9
I can tell you for a fact that racism isn't dead in the North, either. The real question with the voting rights act is, is there still a valid reason for treating some areas of the country differently than other areas of the country?

Gay, abortion, weed. There, did we get it out of our system?
Talk about no sense of humor. You are a very presumptive person.
 

msq2

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#17
You are perfectly free to fail to see the logic in looking at a law and seeing if it works or if it has outlived its usefulness.

Liberal logic: Program fails, throw more money at it and demonize anyone who questions its utility.
hardly, the program is still useful and serves a purpose.
 

CocoCincinnati

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#19
The evidence that it is still needed is what?

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
It's a federal government program. It's mere existence is proof of it's usefulness, efficiency and importance. The only thing that could ever be wrong with it is if it was underfunded. Or something like that. :rolleyes: