Baylor Thread (Big 12 Sanctions Added)

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.
Mar 27, 2012
4,078
4,945
743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
Their plan of keeping tight lipped and not coming clean initially has backfired on them so badly. It would have been over with and any sanctions well under way to putting everything behind them if they would have just come forth with the findings in the beginning. Their ploy has just kept them in the spotlight so much longer, killing the program, as it deserves.
 
Nov 16, 2013
2,354
1,801
243
32
tractor
not only has this blown up in their face, it has managed to bring other things to light. Burn that place down, salt the earth and burn it again. They are a literal cesspool.
 

snuffy

Free Harambe!
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Feb 28, 2007
30,892
28,749
1,743
Oklahoma
Book on Baylor scandal, 'Violated,' a clear reminder why Art Briles should not coach again
Dan Wolken, USA TODAY SportsPublished 4:19 p.m. ET Aug. 20, 2017 | Updated 5:10 p.m. ET Aug. 20, 2017


Now that the lawsuits are starting to get settled, Art Briles is making noise about coaching again. His attorney, Mark Lanier, even told the Waco Tribune-Herald last week that schools have reached out to the former Baylor coach and practically predicted he’d be back on the sidelines in 2018.

So it’s a good time for another reminder of why that shouldn’t happen — not now, not ever.

And as it happens, that reminder arrives Tuesday in the form of Violated, a new book co-authored by ESPN reporters Paula Lavigne and Mark Schlabach that offers the most comprehensive account to date of the Baylor sexual assault scandal that brought down Briles, school president and chancellor Ken Starr and athletics director Ian McCaw among others.

Briles, in many ways, isn’t even the book's main character. As the reporting by Lavigne and Schlabach makes clear, the problems at Baylor were too big and complex to be pinned on one villain, one football team or even one department.

RELATED: Baylor confirms an NCAA investigation is ongoing

ART BRILES: Former coach denies there was a cover-up

COURT: Baylor reaches a settlement with rape accuser

But the role Briles played in aiding and abetting the rotten culture at Baylor — and his lack of answers for how to fix it — should be disqualifying for him to ever work in college athletics again. Though he did not agree to be interviewed for the book, there are more than a dozen pages worth of specific, damning details about how Briles took on players with sketchy histories, actively intervened on their behalf at times to keep them out of trouble and insulated himself at other times from knowledge that might have led Baylor on a different disciplinary course.

Though the book does not provide a smoking gun on Briles’ culpability in covering up sexual assaults, it cites numerous text and e-mail exchanges in which he clearly attempts to keep potential disciplinary problems in-house before they became public.

“I really think it was a window into how he was operating the program and how he was trying to skirt players getting into the drug program and the administration finding out about incidents and even trying to keep things away from the police,” Schlabach told USA TODAY Sports. “It was really eye-opening into how internal his discipline really was.”

AAC | C-USA | MAC | MWC | Sun Belt

INDEPENDENTS: Expect Notre Dame to bounce back in 2017

Even today, there’s widespread dissatisfaction with the process. Some parties within the Baylor community are convinced Briles was made into a scapegoat and want to know specifically why he was fired. Others, including the Big 12 and government agencies in Texas, have pushed for more transparency about what was discovered and how bad it was. And perhaps most of all, there are still victims looking for justice.

But there’s no doubt the book gives voice to all of those elements and explains, through regents who spoke on and off the record, why Baylor did what it did. Though elements of the story are still changing, this is a definitive, comprehensive narrative of the scandal as it stands now and into the future as the school implements sweeping changes in hopes of correcting past mistakes.

“They have put in place the infrastructure to do that, they have added more counselors, more training, they’ve replaced personnel,” said Lavigne, who pointed out that they were not granted an interview with new President Linda Livingstone but were encouraged by the investment of new athletics director Mack Rhoades and football coach Matt Rhule.

“I think time will tell whether or not the cultural change that they have promised to strive for will actually happen.”

As for Briles, though, it’s hard to see a path for his redemption in this. While his public apologies are noted and surely heartfelt, any potential employer that reads Violated will come away with the impression of a coach whose program invited dangerous characters onto campus with little or no vetting, didn’t have a drug testing program and allowed a culture of invincibility to grow with regard to conduct.

Just as troubling is that when it came time for the Board of Regents to meet with Briles before deciding his fate, Lavigne and Schlabach describe a scene in which he apologized for the problems but left the impression he had no plan for how to fix them. Why would it be any different now?

If there’s anything coaches should take from the Baylor scandal it’s that the days of handling discipline the way Briles did — sweeping it under the rug, keeping things internal, not having a system of reporting to superiors — need to be over.

“It was definitely eye-opening because I think there were people in the room that didn’t want to fire Art Briles, but they also felt like they had to have somebody in charge who could fix the problems and it was pretty clear the guy was nothing but a football coach,” Schlabach said. “It just felt like it was the end of the game where he made a bad play call and said, ‘It won’t happen again.’ I don’t think he really understood the gravity of the problems and really just wouldn’t admit to what had happened under his watch.”

Violated is a heavy read, but it’s important work by Lavigne and Schlabach, who were at the forefront of reporting the story as it unfolded in real time. Though in many ways it feels from the outside like Baylor is on a better trajectory and much of the world has moved on from the scandal, the book reminds us why it can’t be forgotten. And why Briles shouldn’t be on a sideline anytime soon.
 

snuffy

Free Harambe!
Staff
A/V Subscriber
Feb 28, 2007
30,892
28,749
1,743
Oklahoma
New Title IX lawsuit against Baylor alleges failures after implementation of new policies

By PHILLIP ERICKSEN pericksen@wacotrib.com 6 hrs ago (0)

Buy Now

Baylor University now faces five active Title IX lawsuits after a woman alleged the school did not properly respond to her report of sexual assault in April 2017.

Staff photo — Rod Aydelotte

The first day of classes in the 2017-2018 academic school year at Baylor University on Monday came with another Title IX lawsuit filed against the school.

In the eighth such lawsuit filed against Baylor and the fifth active case, “Jane Doe 11” alleges she was assaulted by a fellow student in April 2017 and says she faced questions from university officials that tilted blame away from the perpetrator.

Lawyers representing the plaintiff, Chad Dunn and Jim Dunnam, note their client’s allegations come after Baylor’s “media tour patting itself on the back for ‘complete’ and ‘full’ implementation” of 105 recommendations meant to improve the university’s response to sexual violence in the wake of a scandal that cost the president, head football coach, athletics director their jobs.

"I think that, unfortunately, it's an example of how things still have not changed," Dunnam said. "Hopefully, they will."

Dunn and Dunnam also represent 10 former students who allege their assaults between 2004 and 2016 were not adequately handled.

“Baylor University takes any allegation of sexual violence within our campus community seriously,” a Monday university statement said. “We are in the process of reviewing the claims outlined in the lawsuit and will decline to comment further.”

Doe 11 enrolled at Baylor in 2014 as a sophomore with need-based and academic-based scholarships, the lawsuit alleges. After the night of the assault, Doe 11 underwent a sexual assault nurse examination at a hospital, according to the suit, and Waco police, Baylor police and Baylor’s Title IX office were notified.

Her experience with Title IX officials “directly contradicted any assurance that meaningful change had occurred … despite the University’s repeated boasting of full implementation of the recommendations,” the lawsuit alleges.

She alleges she was asked what type of clothes she wore and how easily removable they were, and whether or not she drank alcohol. The university attempted to have her say the alleged assailant may have believed there was consent, according to the suit.

The assailant allegedly told investigators that, aside from kissing, no sexual activity occurred. Doe 11 said she drank two beers and one mixed drink that evening but was not initially affected by it.

However, according to the suit, she experienced dizziness, blurred vision and unconsciousness during the assault. University investigators acknowledged she awoke with blood on her clothes but found that force was not used by the alleged perpetrator, the lawsuit says, and the university also found that the alleged perpetrator asked another woman if she would have group sex with him.

Baylor found that the alleged assailant did not commit an assault, though the same investigators determined he lied about the degree of sexual activity, the suit states.

The Title IX office uses the "preponderance of the evidence" standard to identify Title IX violations, per federal guidelines.

Baylor found that "'a sober reasonable person' would not have believed the plaintiff was incapable of consenting due to incapacitation," according to the lawsuit.

The Title IX office did not respond to her questions about an appeal and did not extend the deadline, the suit alleges.

She alleges she was misinformed by the Title IX office and by Baylor police regarding no-contact and protective orders — at one point being told such orders were “just a piece of paper” and not enforceable.

Police also did not assist Doe 11 after hearing from the alleged assailant, who, according to the suit, asked her for “compassion.”

Doe 11 received “incompletes” in her courses and her financial aid was adversely impacted, according to the suit. She then contacted the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights, which is already investigatingBaylor’s Title IX practices.

Citing a May deposition from then-interim President David Garland, in which Garland claimed he was unaware of details behind the scandal, Dunnam said "it should come as no surprise that changes they claim to have made would not have been adequately implemented."

Baylor police investigated the report, but no charges were filed.

Baylor has reached out-of-court settlements with at least three other alleged victims of sexual assault and another two by former students who filed suits.
 
Feb 15, 2017
250
235
43
63
Texas
The fall couldn't have happened quicker or deeper to suit me.

Question - have we lost any recruiting battle with Baylor this year ? Any on-going ?

I just can't believe that we would lose a recruit to them right now.
 
Oct 7, 2015
976
790
143
St. Elmo, CO
Actually most athletes at Big 12 schools get away with a lot. TCU, ISU, KSU, and OSU are at a pretty big disadvantage because we don't have a law school.
OSU, as well as all of those schools mentioned, have easy access to all of the attorneys they need.
Having a law school (or not having a law school) is neither and advantage nor disadvantage with a schools athletes getting away with anything.
 

CTeamPoke

Legendary Cowboy
A/V Subscriber
Jun 18, 2008
41,613
45,279
1,743
Dallas, TX
OSU, as well as all of those schools mentioned, have easy access to all of the attorneys they need.
Having a law school (or not having a law school) is neither and advantage nor disadvantage with a schools athletes getting away with anything.
It's not about the attorneys is about the judges and prosecutors...
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Nov 16, 2013
2,354
1,801
243
32
tractor
After reading the victim shaming today I have to ask how the craven SBC, and the Baptist General Convention of each state has not disavowed this group and called sin what it is, SIN. I know someone is going to say Baylor is not SBC. Do some research, Baylor gets Cooperative Fund money. Damn cowards
 

RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
A/V Subscriber
Nov 8, 2004
63,461
46,721
1,743
Wishing I was in Stillwater
After reading the victim shaming today I have to ask how the craven SBC, and the Baptist General Convention of each state has not disavowed this group and called sin what it is, SIN. I know someone is going to say Baylor is not SBC. Do some research, Baylor gets Cooperative Fund money. Damn cowards
Baylor gets federal money, too. Damn cowards!
 
Jan 15, 2017
15
25
63
31
Enid
I can’t post links yet because of my post count apparently but josh Gordon just admitted that a Baylor coach helped him pass drug tests so he could play, obviously this is low on the priority list for Baylor screw ups but it’s another addition to the list nonetheless
 
Oct 11, 2016
371
253
93
47
Boulder, CO
I can’t post links yet because of my post count apparently but josh Gordon just admitted that a Baylor coach helped him pass drug tests so he could play, obviously this is low on the priority list for Baylor screw ups but it’s another addition to the list nonetheless
Saw that same article & sadly, my response was basically "no kidding?"

You have to wonder just how many tests he failed for Briles to suspend him.