Baylor Thread (Big 12 Sanctions Added)

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cowboyethics344

Federal Marshal
Apr 2, 2008
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#2
No worries. Briles will probably put the culprits as team captains. His whole recruiting tactic is to tell recruits moms that he will goto church with their son. I guess he will cover up things for them when they do wrong. Sounds like a basketball coach that use to be there
 
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Jostate

CPTNQUIRK called me a greenhorn
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Jun 24, 2005
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#8
Aren't we talking about a Baptist University here?

Uh oh...
 

CTeamPoke

Legendary Cowboy
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Jun 18, 2008
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#9
isn't there some precedent for attempting to hide criminal activity at Baylor, in Waco???
Yep. Their DA got his bachelors from Baylor, his JD from Baylor, and he is a moderator on the Baylor Rival's site.

Baylor athletes get away with a whole lot more than they want us to believe. Actually most athletes at Big 12 schools get away with a lot. TCU, ISU, KSU, and OSU are at a pretty big disadvantage because we don't have a law school.
 

OrangeForever

Member of the SAS
Dec 8, 2007
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#10
Not sure if it applies to private universities
The only way a private institution might be exempt from Title IX is if it receives absolutely no federal funding. So while I'm not 100-percent sure what Baylor's case might be, virtually all universities (both public and private) receive federal funding through federal financial aid programs used by both student athletes and non-student athletes, thus making them subject to Title IX regulations.
 
Apr 7, 2006
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#14
(Legal experts correct me if I'm wrong here) One thing that often gets forgotten is how limited information to the public can be at private institutions, since the Freedom of Information Act does not apply. That means that all the emails, letters, etc. that indict programs (think Penn State/Sandusky incident) aren't open to the public.

While that doesn't hold up to subpoena, it limits the media's ability to expose improprieties. I would venture to guess that programs like Baylor and TCU (along with other more notable programs) benefit greatly from the decreased media access.
 
Nov 16, 2013
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tractor
#15
How do these guys not get hammered? You have the Mulkey thing with Griner or someone, the Bliss Travesty, the former football scandal and now this. This runs right up there with one Joseph Mixon, except they kept the evidence from even seeing the light of day. That Court Room will probably be closed as well.
 
Dec 24, 2007
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Stillwater, OK
#16
Yep. Their DA got his bachelors from Baylor, his JD from Baylor, and he is a moderator on the Baylor Rival's site.

Baylor athletes get away with a whole lot more than they want us to believe. Actually most athletes at Big 12 schools get away with a lot. TCU, ISU, KSU, and OSU are at a pretty big disadvantage because we don't have a law school.
Not necessarily true, we have a large, LARGE volume of students who attend our three law schools in the state. I know many highly respected graduates of OSU that received their JD from ou.
 

OrangeFan69

LA Face with an Okla. booty.
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#20
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While that doesn't hold up to subpoena, it limits the media's ability to expose improprieties. I would venture to guess that programs like Baylor and TCU (along with other more notable programs) benefit greatly from the decreased media access.
I wouldn't call the ability to hide rape a "benefit" but I see where you going.