Assange arrested in London...here we go

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StillwaterTownie

Federal Marshal
Jun 18, 2010
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#6
I don't really know how I feel about this.
How the ACLU feels about it:

“Any prosecution by the United States of Mr. Assange for Wikileaks’ publishing operations would be unprecedented and unconstitutional, and would open the door to criminal investigations of other news organizations. Moreover, prosecuting a foreign publisher for violating U.S. secrecy laws would set an especially dangerous precedent for U.S. journalists, who routinely violate foreign secrecy laws to deliver information vital to the public's interest." by Ben Wizner, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#8
Sounds like he pissed off the Ecuadorians quite a bit.

According to stuff coming out now he got into with the guards, tampered with security measures & alledgedly hacked the embassy's network.
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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#9
He's no friend of this country. Yes he may have exposed the Democrats for the liars and cheaters that they are but he would happily do the same to the Republicans. All of this is just my opinion.

I did see one funny headline earlier: Trump mum on Assange arrest. Yes that's the media of today.. it's news that Trump made absolutely no comment on this story whatsoever.. God only knows how they spun it, because I sure as hell didn't click the link.
 

wrenhal

Territorial Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
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#11
I don't really know how I feel about this.
How the ACLU feels about it:

“Any prosecution by the United States of Mr. Assange for Wikileaks’ publishing operations would be unprecedented and unconstitutional, and would open the door to criminal investigations of other news organizations. Moreover, prosecuting a foreign publisher for violating U.S. secrecy laws would set an especially dangerous precedent for U.S. journalists, who routinely violate foreign secrecy laws to deliver information vital to the public's interest." by Ben Wizner, director of the American Civil Liberties Union’s Speech, Privacy, and Technology Project
WikiLeaks is not a news organization. And to call Assange a journalist?

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#13
very news organization in the free world should be terrified of an Assange prosecution under U.S. law.
In the case of Assange and WikiLeaks, the situation is reminiscent of the famous Pentagon Papers case of 1971. The Pentagon Papers, like the material Assange and WikiLeaks put into circulation, were classified. In both cases, the material revealed misconduct, mismanagement and even criminality by government officials. Federal officials want to make any case against Assange and WikiLeaks about the publication of classified material. The case should be about whether the government can use the classification system to conceal its own criminal conduct from the press and the public and to misuse the judicial process to silence those who exposed its misdeeds.
In the Pentagon Papers case, the Bill of Rights won. Whether it will win in any Assange prosecution remains to be seen.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opin...aks-charged-dubious-crimes-talker/3434423002/
 
Sep 29, 2011
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#14
very news organization in the free world should be terrified of an Assange prosecution under U.S. law.
In the case of Assange and WikiLeaks, the situation is reminiscent of the famous Pentagon Papers case of 1971. The Pentagon Papers, like the material Assange and WikiLeaks put into circulation, were classified. In both cases, the material revealed misconduct, mismanagement and even criminality by government officials. Federal officials want to make any case against Assange and WikiLeaks about the publication of classified material. The case should be about whether the government can use the classification system to conceal its own criminal conduct from the press and the public and to misuse the judicial process to silence those who exposed its misdeeds.
In the Pentagon Papers case, the Bill of Rights won. Whether it will win in any Assange prosecution remains to be seen.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opin...aks-charged-dubious-crimes-talker/3434423002/
Careful now. If Assange was key to cracking the password used to hack (by Manning who refuses to talk) into classified info, his defense as a member of the media is irrelevant.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#15
https://www.vox.com/2019/4/12/18307626/julian-assange-wikileaks-ecuador-cat-poop

Assange was the worst houseguest. Seriously, the worst.
The first rule of being a houseguest: Don’t be rude and gross. The second rule, especially if you’re a notorious global hacker, is don’t spy on your hosts.

Assange broke both of them, even as Ecuador spent $1 million a year to protect him.

Over the years, the WikiLeaks chief clearly grew too complacent with his surroundings. He would skateboard at night, play music extremely loudly, and even walk around in his underwear, according to NBC News. It’s reminiscent of Home Alone, except that it wasn’t his home, he wasn’t alone, and he was the (alleged) criminal.

But his behavior was also downright rude — and more than a little gross. He barely maintained his own personal hygiene, leading the smell from his room to infest the rest of the embassy. He refused to clean up or even feed his cat. And he almost came to blows with the mission’s security staff. As if that wasn’t enough, he acted out and on at least one occasion smeared his feces on the wall.

The embassy tried to rein him in. In March 2018, for example, Ecuador took away his internet in a kind of geopolitical timeout for grown-ups. Assange eventually regained internet access, but only for his personal computer and phone.

All of that, though, didn’t tip the scales. What did, experts say, is that he may have targeted Moreno.

In February 2019, an anonymous website leaked photographs of Moreno’s family and documents that show he and his brother may have profited from offshore accounts in Panama. Assange and WikiLeaks deny having anything to do with that website, but Moreno did all but accuse the embassy denizen of being behind the site. Moreno also denies any wrongdoing.

And so, with Moreno’s government furious at him, it was likely that Assange’s time as Ecuador’s guest would soon come to an end.

“When you’re given shelter, cared for and provided food, you don’t denounce the owner of the house,” Moreno said on Thursday.
 
Nov 6, 2010
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#16
Careful now. If Assange was key to cracking the password used to hack (by Manning who refuses to talk) into classified info, his defense as a member of the media is irrelevant.
Yes, this is my understanding. He is not being prosecuted or charged for publishing anything. The alleged crime was the conspiracy surrounding the attaining of his info.
 
Jul 25, 2018
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#18
https://www.yahoo.com/gma/assange-fears-being-beaten-us-prison-called-trump-230200949.html

"Perhaps most surprising to many who saw his leaks of embarrassing Democratic party emails during the 2016 campaign -- which Special Counsel Robert Mueller has alleged were hacked by Russian spies in an effort to hurt rival Hillary Clinton's chances -- Assange was often sharply critical of Trump in casual conversation with a handful of visitors.

(MORE: After praising WikiLeaks on campaign trail, Trump now says 'I know nothing' about it)

Langan says Assange described longtime Trump friend and political adviser Roger Stone and Donald Trump Jr. as intellectually incapable of a conspiracy, much less one that included WikiLeaks or him, and he rejoiced when Special Counsel Robert Mueller recently closed his investigation without indicting him for conspiring with Russian military intelligence to tilt the U.S. election.

"'Those bunch of clowns' -- that was the exact quote -- 'those bunch of clowns couldn't conspire and organize this kind of thing'," Langan recalled Assange telling him. "He certainly did not hold [President Trump] in high regard. He was quite dismissive."

"Asked about a controversial November, 2018 report in the Guardian newspaper that Assange had met with Trump 2016 campaign manager Paul Manafort -- since convicted on financial crimes related to lobbying in Virginia and in Washington -- he was adamant it never happened. "He said, 'That's [bull]. Never met him.' So he strongly denied that," Langan said.
 
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