Ammo Reloading

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Fathead

Wrangler
Nov 3, 2009
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#4
I got into it this past year. 7mm mag, .270, 30-30, .223/5.56, 9mm, & .40 are what calibers I have dies for although I haven't done loads for all of them yet. It's kind of fun and it will be good to have whenever the next gun scare comes around. I've spent the last year stocking up on all the components for it.
 

OrangeCrush

Territorial Marshal
Oct 26, 2004
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#6
I am also interested in getting into reloading. Calibers I'm interested in are 9mm, .40, 22-250, and .204

I'm leaning towards a turret press to make it easier to change calibers. Is that a good idea or should I go ahead and jump into the deep end and buy a progressive press?
 

osupsycho

Sheriff
A/V Subscriber
Apr 20, 2005
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#9
I got into it this past year. 7mm mag, .270, 30-30, .223/5.56, 9mm, & .40 are what calibers I have dies for although I haven't done loads for all of them yet. It's kind of fun and it will be good to have whenever the next gun scare comes around. I've spent the last year stocking up on all the components for it.
Did you buy the .223/5.56 die in the last year? I ask because I bought a large amount of reloading equipment off of a family member to get started but did not have a die for .223 as that was the one I figured to reload the most. Those were no where to be found through early summer of last year though so I gave up. If they are out there again I may just pick one up, unbox all that I got and try it out.
 
Feb 6, 2007
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#10
I am also interested in getting into reloading. Calibers I'm interested in are 9mm, .40, 22-250, and .204

I'm leaning towards a turret press to make it easier to change calibers. Is that a good idea or should I go ahead and jump into the deep end and buy a progressive press?
I am beginning to accumulate the necessary items to reload for .204, .223/5.56, 6.8 SPC, .243, .25-06, and .270 at the moment.

I have ordered the Redding T7 Turret press. Very well made and gets excellent reviews. This would allow one to set up dies for 3 calibers and to alternate between them without ever messing with the dies. I plan to order an extra plate (head) and set up another 3 calibers on it. I could then have dies set for 6 calibers and can quickly access all of them simply by changing plates.

http://www.redding-reloading.com/in...view=article&id=49:t-7-turret-reloading-press
 

Fathead

Wrangler
Nov 3, 2009
115
16
68
#11
Did you buy the .223/5.56 die in the last year? I ask because I bought a large amount of reloading equipment off of a family member to get started but did not have a die for .223 as that was the one I figured to reload the most. Those were no where to be found through early summer of last year though so I gave up. If they are out there again I may just pick one up, unbox all that I got and try it out.
Yes, they are out there again.
 
Nov 6, 2013
7
3
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#12
I reload both rifle and pistol cartridges, for rifle I reload .223 Rem, .308 Win, .260 Rem and 7.62x54R. Pistol cartridges I reload are .38 Sp/.357 Mag, .45 ACP, .380 ACP, 9 Makarov.
When I began, I followed a suggestion from a friend to start with a single stage press for a couple of reasons but the main reason is to see if it is something you will really do and enjoy before investing a lot of money in a turret or progressive press.
Although I have only been reloading for about a year and a half, I think the best place to start is with straight walled pistol cartridges (like what I have listed). They are very easy to get started on, relatively inexpensive and you don't have to lube the cases before sizing because they are usually carbide dies.
 

Darth Ryno

Territorial Marshal
Jul 26, 2004
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#13
IMO, the best way to learn to reload is the join a Facebook page in your area that is for Firearms/Ammo/Outdoor Sports. Then ask around for those who reload and try to meet with them, ask if they would teach you the basics. I have a friend who taught me this way and it's the BEST way to learn.

But find a 'Group' on Facebook first.
 

OSU Sig

Federal Marshal
Jan 28, 2005
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#14
If you plan to load for AR platforms, give special consideration to "small base" die sets. Otherwise, you may have reloads that won't function through your semi auto carbines.

I shoot factory ammo through my AR and load the brass for my bolt 223. I do not attempt to load military brass for 2 reasons. One, the brass is thicker and pressures are higher. Two, the military brass has to have a special tool to remove the military primer and prepare for a commercial primer.
 

Darth Ryno

Territorial Marshal
Jul 26, 2004
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#15
If you plan to load for AR platforms, give special consideration to "small base" die sets. Otherwise, you may have reloads that won't function through your semi auto carbines.

I shoot factory ammo through my AR and load the brass for my bolt 223. I do not attempt to load military brass for 2 reasons. One, the brass is thicker and pressures are higher. Two, the military brass has to have a special tool to remove the military primer and prepare for a commercial primer.
Good advice. The only AR platform that you need to reload, IMO, are .300 AAC. They are hard to come by, unless you spend $.80-1.50 a round (for just FMJ). My brother-in-law and I ordered 2,000 .300 AAC brass and 500 A-MAX bullets to be reloaded. He had them all finished already.

Those are the only rounds which is really hard to find. Besides your .338, .417, .458 SOCOM and .50 BMG.

Speaking of, I found a box of .50 BMG at Walmart the other day! I went ahead and bought it with the idea that I can trade them at some point. I doubt I buy a .50 cal anytime soon with the 700 I have.
 

dds115

Free Roverto!!!
Aug 11, 2007
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#16
Should I get a progressive press? My budget will be $500. I like that the Hornady Lock N Load since it comes with 500 bullets. I would rather buy once, cry once. I could see myself loading these quantities per year...

308 - 400
223 - 1000
9mm - 1000
40 - 500
and maybe some 45

Anyone that reloads those calibers, can you estimate your cost to reload each (minus brass).
 

OSU Sig

Federal Marshal
Jan 28, 2005
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#17
Based on what you said above, I would not purchase a progressive loader.
I use the Hornady lock-n-load classic single stage press. Using the bushings, it's easy to change calibers and I want to enjoy my loading experience so have avoided a progressive press. I load for over 40 calibers and see no reason for a progressive press. I enjoy the experience of loading and don't mind taking the time it requires to load with my single stage loader.
 

OSU Sig

Federal Marshal
Jan 28, 2005
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#18
IMO, the best way to learn to reload is the join a Facebook page in your area that is for Firearms/Ammo/Outdoor Sports. Then ask around for those who reload and try to meet with them, ask if they would teach you the basics. I have a friend who taught me this way and it's the BEST way to learn.

But find a 'Group' on Facebook first.
Most bullet and powder manufacturers have youtube videos of loading instruction. I highly recommend you check into them. Also, places like H&H shooting here in OKC have monthly loading classes where their experts will teach you the basics.
 

dds115

Free Roverto!!!
Aug 11, 2007
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#19
Based on what you said above, I would not purchase a progressive loader.
I use the Hornady lock-n-load classic single stage press. Using the bushings, it's easy to change calibers and I want to enjoy my loading experience so have avoided a progressive press. I load for over 40 calibers and see no reason for a progressive press. I enjoy the experience of loading and don't mind taking the time it requires to load with my single stage loader.
What other tools do I need for reloading? Brass tumbler, scale, chronograph... what else in needed and/or helpful.
 

OSU Sig

Federal Marshal
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#20
I would recommend you buy the package deal from Hornady or from RCBS. either press will last longer than you and I put together will.
Chronographs are great for load development and you will want one. I use the PACT Professional and like that it prints my shot strings, but others may well do that, too.

Let me put together a list of, what I believe, are necessary and I'll post it later today.