Al Franken resigns, well sort of

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Lab Rat

Hold on while I make a chart
Jan 5, 2012
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#2
I think Congress needs to establish some general rules or guidelines for how to handle accusations of sexual harassment/assault and what to do if/when a member voluntary resigns. That said, I don’t think that a seat should be left vacant for any significant time, as that punishes the constituents by depriving them of representation. This is currently the situation in the districts of John Conyers, Trent Franks, and Tim Murphy, which is a tremendous disservice to those constituents.

IMO, the disgraced representative should be allowed to stay to vote until s/he is replaced, but should be stripped of committee responsibilities and should not be allowed to sponsor legislation or speak from the floor.
 

Cimarron

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Jun 28, 2007
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#3
I think Congress needs to establish some general rules or guidelines for how to handle accusations of sexual harassment/assault and what to do if/when a member voluntary resigns. That said, I don’t think that a seat should be left vacant for any significant time, as that punishes the constituents by depriving them of representation. This is currently the situation in the districts of John Conyers, Trent Franks, and Tim Murphy, which is a tremendous disservice to those constituents.

IMO, the disgraced representative should be allowed to stay to vote until s/he is replaced, but should be stripped of committee responsibilities and should not be allowed to sponsor legislation or speak from the floor.
They already have a policy for sexual harassment, and it's cost the American taxpayer millions of dollars I understand in hush money.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201...settle-sexual-harassment-cases-in-secret.html

Additionally, if you are concerned about constituents being represented then why limit a member of congress to less power or influence than others? "should be stripped of committee responsibilities and should not be allowed to sponsor legislation or speak from the floor"

Franken was simply sacrificed by the Democrats (without actually giving up the seat it now appears) for political purposes.

There is already a system in place to handle resignations, it's in the 17th amendment to the US Constitution.

Basically what it appears Franken is saying is that "Yes, I'm resigning. When I'm good and ready."
 
Jun 20, 2012
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#4
They already have a policy for sexual harassment, and it's cost the American taxpayer millions of dollars I understand in hush money.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/201...settle-sexual-harassment-cases-in-secret.html

Additionally, if you are concerned about constituents being represented then why limit a member of congress to less power or influence than others? "should be stripped of committee responsibilities and should not be allowed to sponsor legislation or speak from the floor"

Franken was simply sacrificed by the Democrats (without actually giving up the seat it now appears) for political purposes.

There is already a system in place to handle resignations, it's in the 17th amendment to the US Constitution.

Basically what it appears Franken is saying is that "Yes, I'm resigning. When I'm good and ready."
You're using Fox News as a source on sexual harassment hush money? That's rich.
 

Cimarron

It's not dying I'm talking about, it's living.
Jun 28, 2007
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#6

Cimarron

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#10
I find it disturbing you defend Donald Trump.
From someone who obviously doesn't understand some of the simplest things concerning the constitution of the United States, why would I care what you think.
 
Sep 6, 2012
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Edmond
#11
https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...-report/ar-BBGWVKu?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartanntp


At least four senators, including two Democrats, have reportedly said that Sen. Al Franken
Alan (Al) Stuart FrankenDemocrats turn on Al FrankenSchumer called, met with Franken and told him to resignOvernight Finance: Trump says shutdown 'could happen' | Ryan, conservatives inch closer to spending deal | Senate approves motion to go to tax conference | Ryan promises 'entitlement reform' in 2018MORE (D-Minn.) should reconsider his resignation.

Sen. Joe Manchin
Joseph (Joe) ManchinTrump rips Dems a day ahead of key White House meetingSenate panel moves forward with bill to roll back Dodd-FrankWealthy outsiders threaten to shake up GOP Senate primariesMORE
(D-W.Va.) told Politico that the deluge of Democrats calling for Franken to resign was “the most hypocritical thing” he has “ever seen done to a human being.”

“What they did to Al was atrocious, the Democrats,” Manchin added. “The most hypocritical thing I’ve ever seen done to a human being — and then have enough guts to sit on the floor, watch him give his speech and go over and hug him? That’s hypocrisy at the highest level I’ve ever seen in my life. Made me sick.”
 

CocoCincinnati

Federal Marshal
Feb 7, 2007
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#13
It seems obvious that the timing of Franken's announced resignation happened solely to try and force Moore to do the same or at the very least paint the Dems in a positive light on the subject to try and get every advantage in what was a very tight race in Alabama.

I thought I had read where Minnesota's governor had already picked the Lt Governor for the spot, but hasn't made it official yet. The Dems are apparently wanting to have the best candidate possible to win the special election in 2018. I certainly understand that, but if they should settle on a man, and considering the Lt Gov is a woman and by all accounts very capable, I wonder if the media will question them about why they didn't stick with her, especially considering WHY Franken resigned.
 

RxCowboy

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#14
From WSJ:

#AlToo?
After winning an Alabama Senate seat, some Democrats are treating Franken as a victim.



U.S. Senator Al Franken (D., Minn.) announces his intention to resign from the Senate in a floor speech on December 7. PHOTO: SENATE TV/REUTERS
By
James Freeman
Dec. 18, 2017 2:32 p.m. ET
356 COMMENTS


That was quick. Less than a week after Democrats used allegations of sexual misconduct to flip a Republican-held Senate seat in Alabama, some party leaders are having second thoughts about pressuring Minnesota’s Al Franken to announce his resignation.

With Democrat Doug Jones having defeated Republican Roy Moore, Democrats have less immediate need to portray themselves as morally superior to Republicans. Now Politico reports:

At least four senators are urging Al Franken to reconsider resigning, including two who issued statements calling for the resignation two weeks ago and said they now feel remorse over what they feel was a rush to judgment.

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.), who urged Franken not to step down to begin with — at least not before he went through an Ethics Committee investigation — said the Minnesota senator was railroaded by fellow Democrats.​

“Could Al Franken un-resign? Sure,” says a headline in the Washington Post. In fact it seems that he never resigned in the first place, despite various allegations of groping. A Post column called “The Fix” observes:

Franken originally said he would cooperate with the Senate Ethics Committee’s investigation, and in his resignation speech he said he was confident he would be vindicated.

But a resignation speech isn’t the same thing as a resignation. A senator’s resignation is not official until they submit a letter to their state’s governor announcing the resignation and the effective date.

Franken’s office did not immediately respond to requests from The Fix about whether he has submitted that letter. But it is not likely that he has, given that Franken still does not have a date when he will resign. Once he sends in a letter with a resignation date, his resignation will be hard to stop.​

Politico also notes that Mr. Franken’s speech was oddly unspecific yet agrees it’s unlikely that he will turn his December 7 address into a completely empty gesture:

Franken’s unusual timeline — in his departure announcement he said he’d go “in the coming weeks,” without setting a date — has fed the fleeting hopes that there’s still time to reverse course. However, Tina Smith, Minnesota’s Democratic lieutenant governor, was named last week as his appointed successor.

People familiar with Franken’s plans said he has not changed his mind and intends to formally resign in early January.​

It was already clear that Mr. Franken’s December 7 gesture was largely, if not completely, empty. A Journal editorial summed up the Minnesotan’s remarks: “Mr. Franken thinks some of his eight accusers are mistaken and the others may be lying. His only admission is that he is a great advocate for women.” The Journal elaborated:

The truth is that Mr. Franken is being run out of town by fellow Democrats in large part for their own political purposes. They want him banished so they can claim to have cleaned their own stables so they can attack Republicans who support Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore and Donald Trump. Mr. Franken is political ballast who had to go.

We’d even have a little sympathy for him had he not chosen the disingenuous exit of claiming innocence but resigning anyway.​

Politico notes that some senators felt they were rushed to condemn Mr. Franken without careful consideration, but also notes:

The feeling is not pervasive throughout the conference. Aides to several Democratic senators who called for Franken to step down, despite their conflicted feelings about doing so, said they remain comfortable with the move.

That includes Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand. The New York Democrat helped lead the charge against Franken the day that POLITICO published the account of a former Democratic congressional aide who said the former comedian tried to forcibly kiss her after the taping of a radio show in 2006.

Gillibrand has said that sending a clear message of zero tolerance is important, and that she was worried that the Ethics Committee process was being used as a shield.“

She has said, ‘He was entitled to a process, but he was not entitled to my silence,’” said one person who has spoken to Gillibrand about the decision.​

It appears that the only ones entitled to Ms. Gillibrand’s silence were Bill and Hillary Clinton, who enjoyed Ms. Gillibrand’s enthusiastic support for more than a decade while they were politically useful. To stay, it seems that Mr. Franken will need to show how he too can be useful to the New York senator.