About These Seeds...

  • You are viewing Orangepower as a Guest. To start new threads, reply to posts, or participate in polls or contests - you must register. Registration is free and easy. Click Here to register.
Jul 22, 2011
2,471
2,805
743
#4
Thankfully seems like just part of a larger phishing scam or padding seller accounts. I still wouldn't plant any unknown seeds, though.

From CNN article:

Officials think it could be part of a 'brushing scam'
Officials haven't confirmed for sure whether these packages are an example of "brushing." But it seems to be a likely possibility given that most of the recipients say they didn't order the items, said Katherine Hutt, chief communications officer for the Better Business Bureau.
"When people get a package that they didn't order, that's one of the first things that we suspect," Hutt told CNN.
Brushing is typically carried out by third-party sellers on Amazon, Ebay, Etsy or other e-commerce platforms who are looking to boost sales through positive reviews, explained Hutt. Those platforms typically only accept reviews for fulfilled orders, so the sellers will ship unsolicited items to recipients and use their names to pose as satisfied customers and submit fake, glowing reviews on their behalf.
Those reviews could be for any product, despite what item the recipient actually received. That might be why some of the packages people have received in recent weeks have been labeled as containing jewelry despite containing seeds, Hutt said. It just so happens that seeds are lightweight and likely cheaper to mail.
If you're the target of a brushing scam, that doesn't necessarily mean any of your personal information has been compromised beyond your name and address, Hutt said. And in the case of these packages of seeds, so far there haven't been any reports or evidence indicating that people have been hacked.
 

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
6,894
6,067
1,743
OKC
#5
It's funny that they have to tell you not to plant the seeds. Who receives an unsolicited package of seeds and thinks to go plant them in their yard?
 

wrenhal

Federal Marshal
Aug 11, 2011
10,254
4,312
743
#6
It's funny that they have to tell you not to plant the seeds. Who receives an unsolicited package of seeds and thinks to go plant them in their yard?
Especially with Asian writing in them and customs forms saying they are jewelry.....

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 
Feb 6, 2007
4,506
4,866
1,743
Ardmore, Ok.
#7
If you receive unsolicited seeds, please do not plant them. They very well could be harmful, invasive species. You may drop them off at your County OSU Extension Office and the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture will collect them at a later date.
 

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
6,894
6,067
1,743
OKC
#11
Ky. woman mistakenly planted seeds from China, and this is what happened

A Kentucky woman said she received seeds in June and believed they were from her planting club, so she planted them.
“I didn’t realize it was a thing until I saw it on the news,” Tiffany Lowery said.
The image she shared shows seeds and a package with Chinese postage, similar to what has been shared by news outlets and officials across the country.
She planted them, and a plant sprouted in a pot near her house.
“I planted them not realizing it was a bad thing. I was in a gift giving group on Facebook and thought it was from one of the members.”
Lowery said once she realized the seeds were not to be planted, she contacted the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. According to Lowery, KDA told her to either burn the plant or double bag it and throw it in the trash. She tried to burn the plant, but said it was difficult, so has triple bagged it but has not thrown it in the trash yet.

:facepalm:
 

Boomer.....

Territorial Marshal
Feb 15, 2007
6,894
6,067
1,743
OKC
#16
REALLY PEOPLE?!?

Arkansas Man Plants Unknown Seeds Received In Mail

ARKANSAS - After people across the U.S. recently received strange seeds in the mail, one Arkansas man decided to investigate for himself.

Although officials warned against planting the seeds, Doyle Crenshaw said the curiosity got the best of him.

Crenshaw, who lives near Fort Smith, planted the seeds a couple months ago and said the plant now has a large white fruit and orange flowers, resembling squash.

“Every two weeks I’d come by and put miracle grow on it, they just started growing like crazy,” said Crenshaw.

The department of agriculture is removing the plant from his property to study it.

1596738990634.png