2000 PT / 600 REB / 600 AST Club

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Lab Rat

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Jan 5, 2012
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#1
Russ just became the newest member of the 2000 PT / 600 REB / 600 AST club. It's a pretty exclusive club.
Screen Shot 2017-03-08 at 12.53.00 PM.png


Oh yeah, there are still 18 games left in this season.

The recent losses have hurt his MVP chances, but I'll note that the only season in the above list to be awarded MVP was Oscar's 1963-64 campaign. His Cincinnati Royals finished 55-25, 2nd best in the NBA that season.
 

Lab Rat

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#2
Russ only needs to average 24.9 PPG, 7.2 RPG, and 8.8 APG over the final 18 games to become the first player in NBA history with 2500 points, 800 rebounds, and 800 assists in a single season.
 

teibbor

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#3
Russ only needs to average 24.9 PPG, 7.2 RPG, and 8.8 APG over the final 18 games to become the first player in NBA history with 2500 points, 800 rebounds, and 800 assists in a single season.
but he needs 820/820/820!!
 

Lab Rat

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#5
Kind of lost in his quest for the triple-double, Russ is on pace to join the 30/30 club. This is averaging at least 30 PPG while keeping a Player Efficiency Rating (PER) of 30. Another very exclusive club, but you'll note that the only player on this list who is also on the 2000 PT / 600 REB / 600 AST list is Michael Jordan in 1988-89.
Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 1.07.39 PM.png
 

Lab Rat

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I don't think people fully appreciate how great of a passer Russell has become. His assist rate of 56.8% this season is the third highest ever, only behind two seasons from John Stockton.
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Dec 19, 2012
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#9
He needs to average 9.9 APG, 8.3 RPG, and -68.4 PPG for that.
I saw on 3/20 Westbrook only needs to average 8.2 assist and 7.2 rebounds to average the Triple Double, very doable now.

Royce Young said Russ just needs 6 triples doubles in 11 games to tie Oscar for most ever.

Russ also had the first triple double when being perfect from the field and free throw line last night.

He is doing crazy, amazing things, if he doesn't win MVP- it's a sham.
 

Lab Rat

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I saw on 3/20 Westbrook only needs to average 8.2 assist and 7.2 rebounds to average the Triple Double, very doable now.

Royce Young said Russ just needs 6 triples doubles in 11 games to tie Oscar for most ever.

Russ also had the first triple double when being perfect from the field and free throw line last night.

He is doing crazy, amazing things, if he doesn't win MVP- it's a sham.
I agree with everything you said, but I don't think he'll win the MVP and it won't necessarily be a sham. The MVP is really the "best player on one of the best teams" award, and has been for a very long time. Even Oscar Robertson only finished third in MVP voting after his triple-double season.

Another good example is comparing Steve Nash and Chris Paul. Nash has two MVPs and Chris Paul has none, but CP3 leads Nash in career Win Shares, career Offensive Rating, career PER, career VORP, career steals, assists per game (not yet career assists, but it is probably inevitable). In other words, Chris Paul is better than Nash by every metric except number of MVP awards. This might ultimately be how we perceive Westbrook vs. Steph Curry when their careers are over.
 
Dec 19, 2012
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#11
I agree with everything you said, but I don't think he'll win the MVP and it won't necessarily be a sham. The MVP is really the "best player on one of the best teams" award, and has been for a very long time. Even Oscar Robertson only finished third in MVP voting after his triple-double season.

Another good example is comparing Steve Nash and Chris Paul. Nash has two MVPs and Chris Paul has none, but CP3 leads Nash in career Win Shares, career Offensive Rating, career PER, career VORP, career steals, assists per game (not yet career assists, but it is probably inevitable). In other words, Chris Paul is better than Nash by every metric except number of MVP awards. This might ultimately be how we perceive Westbrook vs. Steph Curry when their careers are over.
True, but I think the Thunder are better than the Rockets after the trade. Hopefully we'll get to see in the playoffs!
 
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#12
To be fair, that was not the only historic statistical anomoly that season. Wilt lead the league in scoring that year with 50.4 PPG. Second place averaged 31.6.

Wilt also led the league in RPG and a few other advanced metrics that they didn't keep back then.

And Wilt didn't win MVP that year either...

Bill Russell won the MVP and ranked:
- 16th in Scoring
- 2nd in Rebounding
- 12th in Assists
- 1st in Defensive Win Shares (not an actual stat back then, but everyone knows he was the best defensive player in the league back then).
- and was the best player on a team cruising to it's 4th straight championship.
 

Philranger

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#14
Russ only needs to average 24.9 PPG, 7.2 RPG, and 8.8 APG over the final 18 games to become the first player in NBA history with 2500 points, 800 rebounds, and 800 assists in a single season.
With 9 games left he only needs to average 22.9 pts, 5.8 RPG, and 6.9 Ast to hit 2500 pts and the triple double average. Should be pretty doable for him.
 

Lab Rat

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#15
Of all the advanced metrics available, the metric called Box Plus/Minus (BPM) probably does the best job in evaluating the total individual contribution of a player on both sides of the ball. So, unlike PER, it accounts for defensive contributions. Unlike Wins Shares, it is not a cumulative-based stat, so it doesn't give inherent advantages to players with the most minutes played.

That said, here is the explanation for the theory behind and derivation of BPM is here: http://www.basketball-reference.com/about/bpm.html
This page was written after the 2013-14 season, and here are some notes from the page to generally explain BPM:

BPM relies on a player's box score information and the team's overall performance to estimate a player's performance relative to league average. BPM is a per-100-possession stat, the same scale as Adjusted Plus/Minus: 0.0 is league average, +5 means the player is 5 points better than an average player over 100 possessions (which is about All-NBA level), -2 is replacement level, and -5 is really bad.

To get a feel for the scale:

  • The greatest seasons of all time by BPM are LeBron James' 2009 and 2010 seasons, and Michael Jordan's 1989 tour-de-force. All of those seasons had BPMs between +12.5 and +13.0.
  • Some players who over their career were about average (+0.0) include Stephen Jackson, Kurt Thomas, Leandro Barbosa, James Donaldson, and Channing Frye.
  • The best player by BPM in 2013/14 was LeBron James, at +8.9, just above MVP Kevin Durant's +8.8. Kevin Love was close behind at +8.3, and Stephen Curry (+7.4) and Chris Paul (+7.4) round out the top five.
  • Some players at or near +0.0 (average) from the 2013-14 NBA season include: Monta Ellis, Martell Webster, Iman Shumpert, Roy Hibbert, Nene Hilario, Ray Allen, Terrence Ross, and J.R. Smith.
  • The worst player who played significant minutes in 2013-14 was Dennis Schroder of Atlanta, with a very poor -8.3 rating. Anthony Bennett, the surprise 2013 draft number 1 pick, followed with a -7.3.

I want to highlight a sentence in the above post that is key to understanding what Russell Westbrook is doing this season. Here it is again, "The greatest seasons of all time by BPM are LeBron James' 2009 and 2010 seasons, and Michael Jordan's 1989 tour-de-force. All of those seasons had BPMs between +12.5 and +13.0."

Through 73 games, Westbrook is currently posting a BPM of +14.8, which is easily the greatest season of all time by BPM. If you want to see for yourself, here's the link:


Frankly, Westbrook's season blows away any season from LeBron or Jordan or anyone else. This doesn't mean that Westbrook is the GOAT, but it does say that his individual performance this season is probably the best ever.* Using the data from the link above, I plotted the DPBM vs.

upload_2017-3-29_15-4-42.png


*BPM can be calculated back to 1974, which is the first year that BPM can be calculated, due to the unavailability of stats like blocks, offensive/defensive rebounds, steals, and turnovers before then.
 
Mar 23, 2013
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#16
Russ and the Thunder winning again tonight on the road after trailing by 21 in the 3rd quarter is very impressive. His 57/13/11 makes you appreciate how consistent he has been, but his effort /energy is what I respect the most.

I have been critical of him in the past for some out of control play at the end of games, but he is playing lights out right now.
 

Philranger

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#17
Russ and the Thunder winning again tonight on the road after trailing by 21 in the 3rd quarter is very impressive. His 57/13/11 makes you appreciate how consistent he has been, but his effort /energy is what I respect the most.

I have been critical of him in the past for some out of control play at the end of games, but he is playing lights out right now.
Yesterday on the pregame they mentioned something interesting about the Thunder's 3 pt. % broken down by quarter.

1st: Last in the league
2nd: 22nd
3rd: Second to last
4th: 4th

That's insane.
 

Lab Rat

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#18
Of all the advanced metrics available, the metric called Box Plus/Minus (BPM) probably does the best job in evaluating the total individual contribution of a player on both sides of the ball. So, unlike PER, it accounts for defensive contributions. Unlike Wins Shares, it is not a cumulative-based stat, so it doesn't give inherent advantages to players with the most minutes played.

That said, here is the explanation for the theory behind and derivation of BPM is here: http://www.basketball-reference.com/about/bpm.html
This page was written after the 2013-14 season, and here are some notes from the page to generally explain BPM:

BPM relies on a player's box score information and the team's overall performance to estimate a player's performance relative to league average. BPM is a per-100-possession stat, the same scale as Adjusted Plus/Minus: 0.0 is league average, +5 means the player is 5 points better than an average player over 100 possessions (which is about All-NBA level), -2 is replacement level, and -5 is really bad.

To get a feel for the scale:

  • The greatest seasons of all time by BPM are LeBron James' 2009 and 2010 seasons, and Michael Jordan's 1989 tour-de-force. All of those seasons had BPMs between +12.5 and +13.0.
  • Some players who over their career were about average (+0.0) include Stephen Jackson, Kurt Thomas, Leandro Barbosa, James Donaldson, and Channing Frye.
  • The best player by BPM in 2013/14 was LeBron James, at +8.9, just above MVP Kevin Durant's +8.8. Kevin Love was close behind at +8.3, and Stephen Curry (+7.4) and Chris Paul (+7.4) round out the top five.
  • Some players at or near +0.0 (average) from the 2013-14 NBA season include: Monta Ellis, Martell Webster, Iman Shumpert, Roy Hibbert, Nene Hilario, Ray Allen, Terrence Ross, and J.R. Smith.
  • The worst player who played significant minutes in 2013-14 was Dennis Schroder of Atlanta, with a very poor -8.3 rating. Anthony Bennett, the surprise 2013 draft number 1 pick, followed with a -7.3.

I want to highlight a sentence in the above post that is key to understanding what Russell Westbrook is doing this season. Here it is again, "The greatest seasons of all time by BPM are LeBron James' 2009 and 2010 seasons, and Michael Jordan's 1989 tour-de-force. All of those seasons had BPMs between +12.5 and +13.0."

Through 73 games, Westbrook is currently posting a BPM of +14.8, which is easily the greatest season of all time by BPM. If you want to see for yourself, here's the link:


Frankly, Westbrook's season blows away any season from LeBron or Jordan or anyone else. This doesn't mean that Westbrook is the GOAT, but it does say that his individual performance this season is probably the best ever.* Using the data from the link above, I plotted the DPBM vs.

View attachment 53678

*BPM can be calculated back to 1974, which is the first year that BPM can be calculated, due to the unavailability of stats like blocks, offensive/defensive rebounds, steals, and turnovers before then.
Updated, as of 4.6.17.

The top BPM Seasons in NBA History. Not only is Westbrook shattering the all time record this year, but he has three of the top 20 seasons ever (2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17).
BPM_4.6.17.png


The BPM of Every NBA MVP since 1973-74
BPM_4.5.17.png