‘Little House’ Has Been Condemned

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RxCowboy

Has no Rx for his orange obsession.
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#1
From the WSJ oped page:

OPINION COMMENTARY
‘Little House’ Has Been Condemned
A library association erases Laura Ingalls Wilder from history.
By Michael Taube
July 4, 2018 12:47 p.m. ET

Laura Ingalls Wilder is persona non grata at the American Library Association. The board of the Association for Library Service to Children, an ALA division, voted 12-0 last month to rename its Laura Ingalls Wilder Award as the Children’s Literature Legacy Award. “Wilder’s legacy, as represented by her body of work, includes expressions of stereotypical attitudes inconsistent with ALSC’s core values of inclusiveness, integrity and respect, and responsiveness,” the association announced in a press release.

Wilder, best known for her 1935 novel “Little House on the Prairie,” published nine books in all about her pioneer family’s settlement in the Midwest and West. Her endearing stories were based on the importance of faith, family and farming. There were moments of great triumph, as well as periods of hardship, tragedy and illness where she and her family relied on their wits and skills to survive.

The ALSC had fretted in February about Wilder’s “complex” legacy and the “anti-Native and anti-Black sentiments” in her work—a claim not without an underpinning in fact. Characters in “Little House on the Prairie” say “the only good Indian is a dead Indian” three times. The book’s original first chapter also included this description of a place: “There were no people. Only Indians lived there.” In later versions, the first sentence was changed to “no settlers.” Wilder’s references to her white settler family’s manifest destiny has also troubled the black community.

Hardly anyone would defend these sentiments today, but people are products of their times. The Wilder Award was established in 1954, and its first recipient was Laura Ingalls Wilder herself. If we judge past luminaries by today’s standards, who’s next to go?

Each year the World Cultural Council bestows the Albert Einstein World Award of Science. Recently released personal diaries revealed that in the 1920s Einstein described Chinese people as “industrious, filthy, obtuse” and resembling a “peculiar herd-like nation . . . often more like automatons than people.”

As for the American Library Association, since 1982 it has teamed with Amnesty International to promote an annual Banned Books Week. An ALSC blog post about it last September called the week a time to “celebrate intellectual freedom.” How does the ALSC square the spirit of Banned Books Week with its scrubbing of Wilder’s name? I tried to reach them, but didn’t receive a response.

Mr. Taube, a Troy Media syndicated columnist and political commentator, was a speechwriter for former Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper.
 

OSU79

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Ignoring the PC stupidity of the above, here's another Little House on the Prairie story:


Just north of Caney, KS and just east of Hwy 75 is a re-creation (?) of Laura Ingalls Wilder's house and the one-room school at which she taught. My MIL, with a couple of her friends along, saw the signs and decided to stop and check it out. Seeing a small house they pulled in the driveway. Unfortunately the door was locked and there didn't seem to be anyone around. While my MIL is walking around and peering into various windows a woman comes out and asks "What the hell are you doing?"

Seems it was the wrong house . . .
 
Jul 7, 2004
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#3
A woman writing about life as it was in the 1800's is now considered not politically correct. Whats next ban all books describing slavery including those written by former slaves?
 

GodsPeace

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A woman writing about life as it was in the 1800's is now considered not politically correct. Whats next ban all books describing slavery including those written by former slaves?
PC culture will cut off its nose to spite its face. Such stupidity. The books are valuable and can be studied on multiple levels for literature. They are great stories, but the highlighted content are insights into the thoughts of people at the time. PC culture wishes to sanitize history, but I wonder how much of Abraham Lincolns written thoughts would have be censored if we did so for sanitizing history. Can't study the Lincoln-Douglas Debates now can we?

You are incapable of coming to grips with/understanding where we've come from as the human race if we are simply going to bleach out the uncomfortable moments.
 
Feb 11, 2007
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#7
From the WSJ oped page:

OPINION COMMENTARY
‘Little House’ Has Been Condemned
A library association erases Laura Ingalls Wilder from history.
By Michael Taube
July 4, 2018 12:47 p.m. ET

Laura Ingalls Wilder is persona non grata at the American Library Association. The board of the Association for Library Service to Children, an ALA division, voted 12-0 last month to rename its Laura Ingalls Wilder Award as the Children’s Literature Legacy Award. “Wilder’s legacy, as represented by her body of work, includes expressions of stereotypical attitudes inconsistent with ALSC’s core values of inclusiveness, integrity and respect, and responsiveness,” the association announced in a press release.

Wilder, best known for her 1935 novel “Little House on the Prairie,” published nine books in all about her pioneer family’s settlement in the Midwest and West. Her endearing stories were based on the importance of faith, family and farming. There were moments of great triumph, as well as periods of hardship, tragedy and illness where she and her family relied on their wits and skills to survive.

The ALSC had fretted in February about Wilder’s “complex” legacy and the “anti-Native and anti-Black sentiments” in her work—a claim not without an underpinning in fact. Characters in “Little House on the Prairie” say “the only good Indian is a dead Indian” three times. The book’s original first chapter also included this description of a place: “There were no people. Only Indians lived there.” In later versions, the first sentence was changed to “no settlers.” Wilder’s references to her white settler family’s manifest destiny has also troubled the black community.

Hardly anyone would defend these sentiments today, but people are products of their times. The Wilder Award was established in 1954, and its first recipient was Laura Ingalls Wilder herself. If we judge past luminaries by today’s standards, who’s next to go?

Each year the World Cultural Council bestows the Albert Einstein World Award of Science. Recently released personal diaries revealed that in the 1920s Einstein described Chinese people as “industrious, filthy, obtuse” and resembling a “peculiar herd-like nation . . . often more like automatons than people.”

As for the American Library Association, since 1982 it has teamed with Amnesty International to promote an annual Banned Books Week. An ALSC blog post about it last September called the week a time to “celebrate intellectual freedom.” How does the ALSC square the spirit of Banned Books Week with its scrubbing of Wilder’s name? I tried to reach them, but didn’t receive a response.

Mr. Taube, a Troy Media syndicated columnist and political commentator, was a speechwriter for former Canadian prime minister Stephen Harper.
 
Nov 26, 2008
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It's strange to me how selective the PC craze is
it's not like there is a hardline where they all go: ok, we'll excuse everything prior to 1800 that's just too far in the past.
It's completely random, some politicians from the 1700s are evil because they had slaves, others arent. Some writers are bad because they dont fit todays standards, some get to have their legacy live on.

Why is Shakespeare fine when he didnt allow women to act? #MeToo
Why do we still look towards Ancient Greek philosophers for wisdom? They dont fit our standards
 

CocoCincinnati

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#10
I want to know when the PC crazies are going to start protesting to have FDR's name removed from any public schools in the country that bear it....after all, how can we honor somebody who interred Japanese Americans.
 

GodsPeace

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Aug 20, 2004
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#12
A woman writing about life as it was in the 1800's is now considered not politically correct. Whats next ban all books describing slavery including those written by former slaves?
No, but I bet they cut the ones that formers slaves weren't really excited about being freed because they literally had nowhere to go. No jobs, no land, no work unless it was back on the same plantations as a sharecropper. There was no 40acres and mule for anyone. There are free downloadable books on kindle that have thoughts on slavery from former slaves. They(some) didn't necessarily prefer slavery, but many were like "so we free now what?"

One of the parts of the Reconstruction that probably needs more attention is the state slaves were put into with freedom. It was a hell of a rough road.